Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Ferry Firm Challenges Marine Dept in High Court

20th January 2011
Ferry Firm Challenges Marine Dept in High Court
An Aran Islands ferry company is currently battling the Department of the Marine in the High Court over charges for the use of Rossaveal Harbour, the Galway Advertiser reports.
Island Ferries Teoranta claims that harbour fees have risen eight-fold since 2003, saying they are "unreasonable, discriminatory and unrelated to the cost of running the harbour".
The company, run by Paddy O'Brien and family, said it received a bill of more than €200,000 in mid-2005, compared to annual bills of around €23,000 in previous years, and claims that one of its vessels was wrongfully detained when it refused to pay.
Irish Ferries has also accused the Government of breaking EU competition law over its monopoly on the provision of harbour facilities.
The High Court hearings continue.

An Aran Islands ferry company is currently battling the Department of the Marine in the High Court over charges for the use of Rossaveal Harbour, the Galway Advertiser reports.

Island Ferries Teoranta claims that harbour fees have risen eight-fold since 2003, saying they are "unreasonable, discriminatory and unrelated to the cost of running the harbour".

The company, run by Paddy O'Brien and family, said it received a bill of more than €200,000 in mid-2005, compared to annual bills of around €23,000 in previous years, and claims that one of its vessels was wrongfully detained when it refused to pay.

Irish Ferries has also accused the Government of breaking EU competition law over its monopoly on the provision of harbour facilities.

The High Court hearings continue.

Published in Irish Harbours
MacDara Conroy

About The Author

MacDara Conroy

Email The Author

MacDara Conroy is a contributor covering all things on the water, from boating and wildlife to science and business

We've got a favour to ask

More people are reading Afloat.ie than ever thanks to the power of the internet but we're in stormy seas because advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. Unlike many news sites, we haven’t put up a paywall because we want to keep our marine journalism open.

Afloat.ie is Ireland's only full–time marine journalism team and it takes time, money and hard work to produce our content.

So you can see why we need to ask for your help.

If everyone chipped in, we can enhance our coverage and our future would be more secure. You can help us through a small donation. Thank you.

Direct Donation to Afloat button