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14th July 2009

Cobh (Cove) Sailing Club

In the early years of the nineteenth-century, yachting in Cork harbour was the exclusive privilege of the Royal Cork Yacht Club, which raced the yachts of the former J Class: Valkeirie, White Heather, Britannia, Kaisarine, Shamrock, etc. All raced in Cobh and many of the visiting yachts picked up their crews from the natives of the town. The need for a smaller type of yacht being felt, it was decided by some to build a class peculiar to local requirements and conditions.

The class was designed by Fife (FYFE) of Scotland and was known as 'Cork Harbour One Design'. Those boats where built in Carraigaloe (eight in number), Passage West (three) and one was built in Baltimore in west Cork. The emergence of this class brought about the idea for a club for those whose social rating and financial resources could not measure up to the Royal Cork Yacht Club membership and/or class racing. Almost everyone in Cobh owned or could come by some sort of boat, which could sail. Fishing yawls and Hookers were common. In 1904, some stalwarts formed a club and sporadic racing was held. This club was simply known as 'The Sailing Club' as distinct from RCYC

The names of the following: Harry Hoare, Rubin Robinson, Tom Dick Carmody, Jack Aherne, Alex Telford, Tom Farnell, Jack Victury, took to the sea. But the outbreak of World War I (1914–1918) finished or nearly finished racing by the J Class in Cobh and only the one design were left to carry on. Some time in early 1919 the above mentioned men, now joined by Jack Pluck, Bill Horgan, Atwell Allen (Jnr) – all sailing nondescript types of boats – founded Cove Sailing Club. The name Cove came from the old name of the town: 'Cove of Cork' which in turn was called Queenstown after the visit of Queen Victoria in the year 1849. Other members in those early years included Walter Steptoe, Will Cull and Thomas Farrell.

In the 1930s the East Beach Corinthians Sailing Club was formed by Frank O'Regan, Jim Denar, etc., and catered for those small boys who could rise to a new boat, with a window blind or a 'Players please' shop window cover for a sail as well as the more affluent who had sails.

Some of the CSC members: notably Tom 'Dick' Carmody took a keen interest in the kids; and a character called Smith used to hold regattas for them. Those where the days, when every person in Cobh had the same ambition to sail his own boat, and it didn't matter what sort of boat it was.

The East Beach Corinthians Sailing Club went from strength to strength and in the late 1940s, a number of lads built the T class (a do-it-yourself job about 12 feet LOWL). Those who where fortunate enough to own one of these boats felt they were now a cut above the ones who only had punts. The outbreak of World War II (1939–1945) again depleted the members of ESBC. To save it from complete collapse ESBC was incorporated into Cove Sailing Club in 1948.

(The above information and image courtesy of Cobh Sailing Club) 

 
Cobh Sailing Club, PO Box 12, Cobh, Co. Cork. Email: [email protected]

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Published in Clubs

History

The Club was formed in 1899 by an amalgamation of the Ulster Sailing Club with the Cultra Yacht Club, and was initially called the North of Ireland Yacht Club. It retained that title until 2 September 1902 when His Majesty King Edward VII was graciously pleased to command that the Club be henceforth known as 'The Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club.'

The Club has attractive seafront premises in Cultra. The buildings have been extended and adapted over the years to provide the facilities required for all the Clubs activities. In the first half of the 20th Century the Club encouraged lawn tennis, croquet and other social activities, and even ran timed automobile trials for the more adventurous spirits. However sailing has obviously always been the main activity of the club. The good holding ground for the swinging moorings in front of the clubhouse is complimented by the clubs boatyard and slipway.

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Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club and Optimist dinghies preparing to launch for an Ulster Championship race. Photo: Thomas Anderson

In 1902 several club members got together and commissioned the Fairy Class racing dayboat design. This Class has been sailed locally since then and although some of the boats migrated to Lough Erne the Class is still strongly supported at Cultra.  Some of the boats have been substantially rebuilt in recent years. Club members have always been ready to accept new designs and in the 1930s the then new Dragon Class was adopted.

There was no club sailing during World War II but it was RNIYC members in the Dragon Class who represented Britain in the 1947 Olympic Games at Torbay. The 1970s saw the arrival of the Squib Class. The popularity of these boats has fluctuated over the years but, with thirty five boats, the Clubs fleet is now one of the largest in the British Isles.

Club racing for the Fairy, Squib and Mirror Classes and for other dinghies takes place on three occasions every week during the sailing season. Many Club members own cruising boats. Nowadays they keep them in local marinas or in Strangford Lough. Racing for the Cruisers used to include passage races organised jointly with the Clyde Cruising Club; however, these races are generally no longer popular and most cruiser racing currently is of the inshore variety. Nevertheless some of the Clubs boats can regularly been seen competing at Cork Week and in the Scottish series. Many of the Club's cruisers voyage far afield to foreign destinations whilst most enjoy the pleasure of taking their families to ports in N. Ireland and the nearby Scottish west coast and Isles.

The future of RNIYC lies in the hands of the extremely active and enthusiastic cadets who now number over one hundred.

clip_image002_005.jpg The Club is fortunate in its location. It lies between the two centres of greatest population density in Northern Ireland and good transport links from both abroad and locally make it easy for visiting competitors to reach the excellent sailing area. The Club has in recent years hosted the Edinburgh Cup, the Squib Nationals, Mirror Irish Nationals as well as other prestigious events. The racing is always keen while functions ashore are supported with suitable entertainment and excellent club catering to suit all tastes. The Club is constantly striving to improve facilities both on and off the water.

(Details and images courtesy of the Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club) 

 

Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club, 7 Seafront Road, Cultra, Co Down BT18 0BB, N. Ireland. Office: 028 9042 8041   Bar: 028 9042 2257   Caterer:   028 9042 4352   Email: [email protected]

 

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Published in Clubs
14th July 2009

Lough Neagh Sailing Club

Lough Neagh Sailing Club is situated at the southern end of the largest inland waterway in the British Isles. The racing area is superb and also offers an exciting – but safe – cruising ground with access to the open sea via the Lower Bann.

Founded in 1877, the club had 30 members by 1888, each paying 10/s. per annum.

We are now based in Kinnego Marina at the south end of Kinnego Bay. This is the largest and most modern marina on the Lough and we are well provided with excellent support services from Craigavon Borough Council and chandlery, boat sales and repair services provided by CarrickCraft.

We’re just one minute off Junction 10 (Lurgan) on the M1 Motorway. Follow the directions to Oxford Island and then turn off into Kinnego Marina. Lough Neagh Sailing Club is situated to the left of the main Harbourmasters office.

Lough Neagh Sailing Club, Kinnego Marina, Oxford Island, Craigavon, Co. Armagh

 
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Published in Clubs
14th July 2009

Royal Irish Yacht Club

“Some things in life extend beyond ordinary experience – the Royal Irish Yacht Club is such a place, once enjoyed it can only be equalled by return.”

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The painting of the Royal Irish Yacht Club (above) is an extract from a larger painting of the club from the marina by one of the RIYC members, Desmond McCarthy.

For the latest RIYC news click HERE

Part of Club life is availing of the magnificent Clubhouse facilities where you can meet new people and develop lasting friendships. The Club hosts a wide variety of social events throughout the calendar year making it easy to keep in touch with fellow yachtsmen and women. As well as the regular scheduled events the Club caters for parties to celebrate the holidays, informal events, educational seminars, theme dinners, and all occasions. All this and more is brought to you by our highly qualified and professional catering team.

We are extremely proud of our catering department that facilitates all types of gatherings, both formal and casual, and always to the highest quality and standard. We have a number of venues within the Club each of which provide a different ambience to match your particular needs.

The Dining Room – This elegant room is steeped in club tradition. The décor creates an atmosphere of elegance and is the perfect venue for fine dining. Our menu offers a blend of the finest international cuisine using the freshest local produce. This is complemented by a fine selection of fine wines and unobtrusive friendly service. We know our kitchen will help you discover many culinary treasures.

The Upper Bar – A great meeting place for members. Relax with a glass of wine beside the fire and enjoy good conversation and the intimate surroundings. Our bar staff is committed to good service

The Drawing Room – A comfortable lounge tastefully decorated. Use it to relax and read the daily papers and journals. Bring a friend for tea/drinks. In winter the fires are ablaze creating that special warm atmosphere. This room is also used for cocktail receptions and private parties. We also provide daily a Traditional Afternoon Tea.

The Library – Recently restored has a wealth of sailing knowledge on its shelves. This Room is frequently used for meetings, seminars, business meetings, briefings, launches and small conferences. Reap the highest level of achievement in a traditionally peaceful and undisturbed working enviroment. It is the perfect private dining venue, for parties from 10 to 40, or cocktail receptions.

The Wet Bar – The venue for ‘many occasions’, The Wet Bar, since its refurbishment, has become the flagship for our function department as well for our Casual Dining programme. It is a multi-faceted room and can host a multitude of different functions. It is ideal for banquets, birthday celebrations, dinner/dances, weddings etc can also can be converted into a bistro for theme events and culinary journeys. It has a maximum seating capacity of 140. The centre of the room is dominated by a hi tech bar which sets the tone for intimate yet informal dining experiences. Our catering department will supply you with a comprehensive list of our extensive range of menus. We tailor make every function to suit your needs.

Weddings – The Dining Room at the Royal Irish is an ideal venue for your wedding reception. Beautifully decorated with old world charm, Waterford crystal chandeliers and exquisite views of Dublin Bay create the perfect setting. We cater for up to 90 guests. Superlative cuisine and unparalled service are the order of the day with waiter service all evening.

The Deck – the Club’s ‘al fresco’ venue. Relax and enjoy Irelands balmy days overlooking the Bay and the yacht basin. It is ever popular on Sunny evenings watching the sun set and enjoying the ambience of our wonderful club.

Sailing Suppers and Barbeques – During the sailing season we serve sailing suppers in the Wet Bar on Thursday and Saturday Evenings. Great food, great vibes after a great sail. In Good weather we serve BBQs on the deck for the yachtsmen returning from their evening sail.

(All details and image courtesy of the Royal Irish Yacht Club) 

 

Royal Irish Yacht Club, Harbour Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01 280 9452, fax: 01 284 2470, emai: [email protected]

 
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Published in Clubs

The club was born in 1965, but was conceived long before then in the Crofton Hotel (where the BIM offices now stand). It was there that a number of owners who were not members of any club and who kept their boats haphazardly in the Inner Harbour or in the Coal Harbour used to meet.

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Above: Frosbite series, 2009

It was at the suggestion of Joe Briscoe, our founder commodore, that the formation of a proper club was considered and with a subscription of £1 each he raised a fund of £30. With this and the help of a dedicated band the task was tackled.

Meetings with official bodies, plans and more plans, articles of association, planning permissions – horrendous problems were tackled and solved. The then harbour master, Commander Thompson suggested the present site while members gave their services free of charge. Amongst there were architect Brian Doran, heating engineer Cecil Buggy, civil engineer Jim Hegarty and many, many others who donated their skills.

Big money was then needed so, to supplement grants and loans, a water carnival was run which attracted 25,000 people to Dun Laoghaire and yielded £2,000 – undreamed of success. It was repeated the following year.

The club was finally built and has since undergone a number of modifications including the building of the slip and the dinghy park. We owe a great debt of gratitutude to our founder members whose names are honourably inscribed on a board over the stairway.

The Club was named to indicate that it catered for all types of craft and for all types of people - the only common denominator being that they get their enjoyment from boating.

So if your leisure pleasure is serious sailing or just ‘messing about in boats’ and if you are looking for friendly companionship which will last a lifetime - welcome aboard!

(Above information and image courtesy of the Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club)

 
Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club, West Pier, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01 280 1371

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Published in Clubs

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The Royal Cork Yacht Club  

History

Some time in the early 1600s, the idea of sailing for private pleasure started to take root in the Netherlands. Later that century, during the Cromwellian years, King Charles II of England was in exile in the Netherlands and while there he became aware of this new and exciting pastime. In 1660 after his restoration to the English crown and return from exile, Charles was presented with a yacht called Mary by the Dutch, which he sailed enthusiastically on the Thames. Soon several of his courtiers followed his example and we feel pretty certain that one of them was Murrough O’Brien, the 6th Lord Inchiquin (Murrough of the Burnings). We know that not only had he attended the court of King Charles from 1660 to 1662, but also that he had been created the 1st Earl of Inchiquin by Charles in 1664. We also know that private sailing started to become popular in Cork Harbour shortly after his return, quite possibly because of his direct encouragement. In any case, by 1720, interest in the sport had progressed so much that his great-grandson, the 26 year old William O’Brien, the 9th Lord Inchiquin, and five of his friends got together to formalise their activities and in so doing established ‘The Water Club of the Harbour of Cork'. This club is known today as the Royal Cork Yacht Club and it is the oldest yacht club in the world.

They based themselves in a castle on Hawlbowline Island, the lease of which Lord Inchiquin held. From that castle they regulated their sailing, membership and dining affairs according to a set of rules known to us today as ‘The Old Rules’.

In the early years the majority of club sailing activity took the form of sailing in various formations, copying the manoeuvres of the navies of the day. They communicated with each other by means of flying different flags and firing cannons. Each display and sequence of flags or guns meant something and every yacht owner carried a common signal book on board, which allowed them to communicate with each other. Paintings from 1738 in the possession of the club show club yachts carrying out such manoeuvres.

Shortly before 1806 the club moved to the nearby town of Cove as the British Admiralty decided that they had a greater need for Hawlbowline Island than we had. The American Revolution and then later on the French Revolution, would have been significant factors in the Royal Navy’s decision to build up their presence in the safe and strategic harbour of Cork. Kinsale had been the main naval centre on this coast up until this time but that harbour had begun to silt badly causing problems for warships which in addition had become bigger with deeper draughts.

By 1806 the Water Club of the Harbour of Cork had started to refer to itself as the Cork Harbour Water Club. During the 1820s, following the fashion of the few other clubs that had emerged by then, it changed its name to include the word ‘Yacht’ and dropped the word ‘Water’ and became known as the Cork Harbour Yacht Club. Later on that decade it dropped ‘Harbour’ and became the Cork Yacht Club. In 1831 King William IV granted the club the privilege of using the prefix ‘Royal’ and it became known as the Royal Cork Yacht Club.

The Club had been using various premises in Cove as clubhouses but eventually, in 1854, it moved into a magnificent new building which it had built on land given to it by the then Admiral, J.H. Smith Barry. The building, which stands directly onto the waterfront, was to become not only a major yachting centre but also an essential meeting place for Cork society.

By mid century membership was keenly sought after and club records show that many candidates were disappointed. One who was fortunate to be admitted was Prince Ferdinand Maximilian of Austria, later to be Emperor of Mexico. Prince Ferdinand was a brother of Emperor Franz Joseph and was the founder of the Imperial Austrian Navy. A special meeting of the General Committee was convened on 30th November 1858 to consider if Prince Ferdinand should be allowed to go forward for ballot for membership. It was felt by many of the members that ‘the admission of Foreigners’ into the club might cause the Lords of the Admiralty to withdraw some of our privileges. After the matter was discussed for some time he was allowed to go forward and was in due course electedand admitted.

One of the very first sporting heroes, Sir Thomas Lipton, who challenged for the America’s Cup sailing his famous series of yachts called Shamrock, was admitted to the club in 1900.

By the 1960s changing economic and social patterns made Cobh less and less attractive as a base for the club. In 1966 the Royal Cork and the Royal Munster Yacht Clubs agreed to merge and the Royal Cork moved to its present premises in Crosshaven assuming the title ‘The Royal Cork Yacht Club, incorporating the Royal Munster Yacht Club’.

In the 1970s and 80s the very pinnacle of sailing competition was the Admirals Cup which was an international competition based on teams of three boats. The Royal Cork was the pivotal point for the very competitive Irish teams of those years, the right designer, builders, sail maker, crews, and owners with vision all came together at the same time and gave nations with greater resources cause for reflective thought.

The Royal Cork Yacht Club today encompasses a wide variety of sailing activities from young kids in their Optimist and Mirror dinghies sailing right through the winter months to the not-so-young kids racing National 18s and 1720s during the remaining nine months. There is also enthusiastic sailing in 470s, Int. 14s, Lasers, Laser IIs and other dinghies. The larger keelboats race on various courses set in and around the Cork Harbour area for club competitions. They also take part in events such as the Round Ireland Race, Cowes Week and the Fastnet Race.

In many far off waters, right across the globe, overseas club members proudly sail under the Royal Cork burgee. The club has a significant number of cruising members, many of whom are content to sail our magnificent south and west coasts. Others head north for the Scottish islands and Scandinavia. Some go south to France, Spain, Portugal and the Mediterranean. The more adventurous have crossed the Atlantic, explored little known places in the Pacific and Indian Oceans while others have circumnavigated the globe.

Looking forward into the 21st century, the Royal Cork goes from strength to strength, total membership is around 1500, our facilities are unparalleled in Ireland and continue to expand, major World, European and Irish Championships are hosted in the club regularly. Cork Week, which is held every two years, is regarded as Europe’s best fun regatta bar none and attracts contestants from all over the world. Recently the Royal Cork was proud to host the ISAF Nations Cup. The activities of the club are regarded as a major tourism asset for the Cork area and significantly contribute to the economy of Crosshaven. The Royal Cork may be almost 300 years old but it is still vibrant, progressive and innovative – just as it was in 1720.

(Details and image courtesy of the Royal Cork Yacht Club and Bob Bateman) 

 

Buy the RCYC History Book here

 

Royal Cork Yacht Club, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. Tel: +353 21 483 1023, fax: +353 21 483 1586, email: [email protected]

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Published in Clubs
14th July 2009

Wicklow Sailing Club

Wicklow Sailing Club

Founded in 1950, the club currently has over three hundred members, racing in several classes including cruisers, Wayfarers, 420s, Lasers, Toppers and Mirrors. Racing for cruisers during the summer season is every Wednesday and Sunday, while racing for dinghies is held every Saturday afternoon. Our cruising sailors usually head to Porthmadog in July and we often take in other trips along the Irish coast. We provide Junior Training during the month of July and/or August for ten years old and up.

Wicklow Sailing Club is an ISA accredited training centre for junior training levels 1 to 5 and also powerboat training. 

Our sailing visitors are always welcome to use the Clubhouse and it’s facilities. We have a very friendly reputation on Ireland’s East Coast and love to hear tales of sailing derring do. The bar is open every night in the summer (Jun/Jul/Aug) and Thursday to Sunday in the winter. Adequate berthing is available on the quayside (East pier) or only by prior arrangement on swing moorings. Wicklow is a busy commercial port, with often one or more large ships berthed in the river and an active whelk fishing fleet, so berthing space can be a problem.

Our clubhouse is located on the South Quay of Wicklow harbour, adjacent to the RNLI station.

We are twinned with Madoc Yacht Club, our Welsh neighbours in Porthmadog, North Wales. Now our Town Councils are also twinned which was formalised in September 2006.

History

In the year of 1950, a small band of enthusiasts under the guiding arm of the late Joseph T. O'Byrne (fondly remembered by all as J.T.), gathered in the Bridge Hotel (birthplace of Capt. Robert Halpin, master of the ‘Great Eastern’ steamship that laid the first TransAtlantic cable in the late 1860s) to put the wheels in motion to start a new club in Wicklow, dedicated to Yachting, and in 1951, Wicklow Sailing Club was born.

The first boats acquired for the fledgling Club had an interesting history. The boat decided on by the new members was the Cadet, a 12’ wooden dinghy, and the first five of these came to the Club from an unlikely source. A former Army Captain, who had killed his wife’s lover in a fit of jealous rage, was detained in Dundrum Lunatic Asylum for the Criminally Insane, and was contracted by those founding members to build a number of these boats. Along with the unfortunate Captain’s consignment (collected from Dundrum by Harry Jordan, a founding member, former Commodore and WSC’s only continuous member over the 50 years), some club members also built a number of other dinghies, like the Kearney brothers GP14, and a racing fleet was born.

The next major step was the requirement for a club/store house and through the efforts of these new members running hops, dances and other fundraising events, sufficient funds were raised to secure a site on the South Quay adjacent to the RNLI station. The first sod was turned in 1953, and a basic building erected. Through several subsequent transformations, this humble shed has now become the fine modern comfortable Clubhouse and Bar that exists today for our members to enjoy.

In the 50s, the Club expanded rapidly and more dinghies were required to keep pace with the demand. They acquired Herons, IDRA 14s, and the members through another cooperative effort built several Graduate dinghies, one of which still survives today in the ownership of Stan Kiddle, our former Honorary Subscriptions Secretary. It was this spirit of all hands on deck that has surely laid the solid foundation that has made Wicklow Sailing Club the vital force that it has now become in Irish sailing. During the 60s and 70s, mini fleets of 420s and Mirrors regularly graced the waters off Wicklow Bay, a learning ground for many sailors who are now well known all around our coasts. Over the intervening years, many regional and national dinghy events have been successfully run from the slipway in front of the Clubhouse and in the early 70s, J.T. oversaw the building of the boatpark, adjacent to the slip.  This Boatpark was upgraded in 2006 with the laying of a concrete floor and is now a wonderful facility for our mainly junior dinghy fleet.

Eventually a number of cruisers augmented J.T.’s ubiquitous ‘Wamba’ to add a new dimension to the sailing options available. Boats such as the wooden Polish folkboat bought by Peter Gale, called ‘En-route’, and subsequently his ‘Felice’ on which he was to die in the Isle of Man. Wicklow had had a long history of Cruiser racing going back into the previous century, when the British custodians of the day would run regattas (in conjunction with the Town Regatta Festival, which is Ireland’s oldest continuously-run festival) for their military and noble folk and some of their grand trophies have survived to the present day. In more modern times, several regattas and rallies using Wicklow as their hub, attracted sailors from up and down our coast as well as from across the pond in Wales and England. The early 70s had firmly established Wicklow as a fun place to go for a Bank Holiday weekend of good sailing and craic. In 1979, a Round Ireland Rally was proposed (with a number of stopovers enroute) and due to its success, a more ambitious idea was born.

A race, starting from and finishing in Wicklow, leaving Ireland and all its islands to starboard was proposed, and under the stewardship of the late Michael Jones, the 1980 Round Ireland was born. Subsequently, under the sponsorship of Cork Dry Gin, this supreme offshore test of boat and man has become a major International event on the biennial sailing calendar. BMW came on board as title sponsors in 2004 and the race continues to grow in stature. The current co-ordinator, Dennis Noonan, is very encouraged by the positive feedback received, both from sailors at home and abroad. This event is obviously the jewel in the crown of Wicklow Sailing Club and despite the onerous demands it puts on the shoulders of all the members every two years, it will continue to be hosted from Wicklow harbour for the foreseeable future. During 2008, WSC hosted two major dinghy events (incl. Fireball Nationals) as well as the BMW Round Ireland.

Wicklow Sailing Club is proud of its role in bringing many visitors to Wicklow harbour throughout the sailing season, who add colour and variety with their boats and also contribute in no small way to the tourism spend within the local community. This has been greatly enhanced by our very strong relationship with several Clubs and individuals across the Irish Sea, to the extent that we are formally twinned with Madoc Yacht Club, who are based in the beautiful town of Portmadoc, which nestles under an impressive backdrop of Snowdonia and we are particularly chuffed that this connection was instrumental in the official twinning of the respective Town Councils in 2006.

Our founding members (of whom a few still survive) would be proud to see the thriving Club that exists today, 50 years later, and now that a new Millenium has dawned, the mantle has passed to the current membership to take the next brave steps to further improve and enlarge both our facilities and numbers. One member, Harry Jordan, has continued this connection unbroken right down to the present day, even though he spends most the year in Bundoran, Co Donegal nowadays.

Unfortunately, space is now at a serious premium both on our moorings and in the Boatpark, with the result that we are unable to promote space for new boatowning members. Perhaps the initiatives of bodies like the Irish Marine Federation, who represent Leisure boating interests against a Government that continues to ignore Ireland’s potential maritime goldmine, will bear fruit as there seems to be a severe lack of will in the public sector to improve Wicklow’s long overdue upgrade to a marina destination.

Wicklow Sailing Club will open its doors to all who wish to sail, provide a safe and friendly environment in which to participate in the sport, advance plans to improve Clubhouse and waterside facilities and continue to contribute to the sporting and social life of Wicklow and its environs.

Wicklow Sailing Club, South Quay, Wicklow Harbour. Tel: +353 0404 67526, email [email protected]

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Published in Clubs

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Brief History of Poolbeg area

Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club is adjacent to the Pigeon House coal burning electricity-generating station, which was officially closed in July 1976. It nestles at the foot of the towering twin stacks of the modern Poolbeg Power station, which replaced the Pigeon House in 1965. It is a site of considerable significance in the history of Irish technology close to the centre of Dublin.

There is an established walk close to the club. The South Wall of the Port of Dublin extends from Ringsend nearly four miles out into Dublin Bay. This is one of the longest sea-walls in Europe. The walk continues to the Half Moon bathing place. Further on is the landmark Poolbeg Lighthouse. The Poolbeg Lighthouse was built in 1768, but was re-designed and re-built into its present form in 1820.

Ringsend Village

There are different versions of the origin of the name Ringsend, but it is most probably derived from the Irish word Rinn meaning a point or spit of land jutting into the sea.

The area seems to have been relatively uninhabited up until the 1620s when a fishing station grew up around the end of a point jutting into the estuary among mudflats and salt marshes where the Liffey and Dodder met the sea.

A harbour was developed at Poolbeg and Ringsend replaced Dalkey as Dublin’s principal port.

From the mid-17th century hotels and lodging houses began to spring up to cater for the many sailors, soldiers, port officials and travellers passing through the area.

In 1654 the Chief Justice of Ireland, Henry Cromwell, ordered everyone of Irish blood to move two miles outside Dublin city and this led to the establishment of Irishtown.

By the turn of the century the population had increased significantly and a floating chapel was moored nearby to cater for the spiritual needs of the community. Work then began on St. Matthew’s church in Irishtown in the early 18th century, one of a number of ‘Mariners’ churches’ around Dublin Bay. Incidentally, the vaults of St. Matthew’s were reputedly used as a store for smuggled goods, smuggling being rife in the area during this period.

Throughout the 1700s travelling to and from Ringsend and Irishtown was risky, particularly after dark, as highwaymen and thieves roamed the surrounding countryside.

Press gangs also stalked the inns abducting people for the British Navy.

To make matters worse several bridges were swept away until the current granite structure was built after the flood of 1802 and the danger posed by the Dodder diminished after the construction of the reservoir at Glenasmole in 1868.

Fishing provided a good living for many, boat building, chemical works and other industries provided employment, and hot and cold seawater baths attracted day-trippers and longer-term visitors to Irishtown. Indeed Wolfe Tone often stayed in Irishtown to take a break from political activity.

The Great South Wall, including the Poolbeg lighthouse, was constructed throughout the 18th century to provide greater protection for vessels, and dredged soil from port improvements was used to form many streets on either side of the Liffey, the sites being apportioned by ‘lot’, hence the name South Lotts Road.

The Ballast Board was founded in 1786 to manage the port. This later became the Dublin Port and Docks Board, now called the Dublin Port Company Ltd.

The embankment of the quays was also completed during this period.

On the 23rd April 1796 a crowd of 60,000 people witnessed the opening of basins and sea-locks connecting the newly-built Grand Canal to the Liffey at Ringsend.

It was an astounding development, which equalled the entire Liverpool docks at the time and meant that Dublin was fast becoming the second port in Ireland and Britain.

However, an economic downturn followed the Act of Union in 1800 as restrictive tax laws were imposed. To compound matters, in 1818 the mail boats from Holyhead switched to Howth, later to a new terminal at Dún Laoghaire, while the Royal Dockyard was also removed.

The worst ravages of the 1845–47 famine were avoided in the Ringsend area due to the availability of fish and the importation of Indian corn by the local landlord, Sidney Herbert, and as the 19th century wore on the many industries such as glass and rope manufacturing, boatyards, mills and the new gasworks provided welcome employment.

In 1863 the Pembroke Township, consisting of Baggotrath, Donnybrook, Sandymount, Ringsend and Irishtown, was formed. Improvements in the following decades included a horse drawn tramline laid through the area in the early 1870s linking Nelson’s Pillar with the Martello Tower at Sandymount, and the construction of the sewage works in the 1880s. The Earl of Pembroke also provided funds for Ringsend Technical School, 1892, and the development of Pembroke Cottages, the first of a series of housing developments for workers, in 1893.

Around the turn of the century local Parish Priest Canon Mooney was a tireless worker on behalf of the local population, and was responsible for the rebuilding of St. Patrick’s church in the early 1900s.

During the 1916 Rising, Boland’s Mill on the Canal Docks was occupied by rebels under the command of de Valera. The flat complexes George Reynolds House and Whelan House are named for two local men who fought in the Rising, while O’Rahilly House is called after The O’Rahilly who was part of the GPO garrison.

In the 1930s the Pembroke Township was incorporated into Dublin city. Many changes have taken place in the intervening years including construction of new housing and the East Link Bridge, and the upgrading of Shelbourne Park Greyhound Stadium. The Dublin Docklands Development Authority is also now redeveloping a large site; a Village Improvement Scheme is being implemented for Ringsend; and Irishtown Stadium.

Dublin city based Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club has completed developing its state of the art 100-berth marina facility in the heart of Ireland’s capital. Situated in Ringsend, a harbour area with a colourful maritime tradition stretching back to the 17th century, Poolbeg Yacht/Boat Club & Marina is in a prime location just 3kms from the cultural, historic, social and retail centre of Dublin.

The club has been welcoming locals and visitors alike for over thirty years. Members old and new, appreciate the friendly, family-oriented atmosphere of this highly sociable club.

The new 1.5 million euro marina development is a major new city attraction, particularly for visitors wishing to berth their vessels near the heart of Dublin and for Dublin based owners who like their vessels moored near the office for a quick getaway on Friday evenings! The marina also meets the international standards required to satisfy any yachtsperson who visits a European capital city

On-shore, the Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club’s existing and new members, have benefited from the expansion and redevelopment of its clubhouse which has undergone a 500,000 euro dramatic facelift.

pic_1.jpg The only Yacht/Boat Club & Marina in the heart of Dublin. A number of berths are available, depending on size, on an annual or six month basis. Berths are also available for visitors on a short-term basis.

Poolbeg Yacht/Boat Club & Marina offers a unique package to serious sailors, leisure-time enthusiasts or beginners alike:

* The only marina and club in the heart of Dublin
* 100 secure fully serviced berths for long and short term stays
* Welcoming and sociable
* Full club support and facilities
* All levels of sailing and training for adults and children
* Affiliated to the Irish Sailing Association

Poolbeg Yacht, Boat Club & Marina, South Bank, Pigeon House Road, Ringsend, Dublin 4. Tel: +353 1 668 9983, Fax: +353 1 668 7177, email: [email protected]

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Published in Clubs
14th July 2009

National Yacht Club (NYC)

nyc

For all the latest news from the National Yacht Club click HERE

The Club

Founded on loyal membership, the NYC enjoys a family ethos and a strong fellowship which binds our members in a relaxed atmosphere of support and friendship.

Bathing in the gentle waterfront ambience of Dun Laoghaire on the edge of South County Dublin, the National Yacht Club has graced the waters of the Irish Sea and far beyond for more than a century.

Our famous burgee is a familiar sight in the sailing waters of Ireland, and the proud victory roll of our individual members and our Club is second to none.

 

Sailing Facilities

A slipway directly accessing Dun Laoghaire Harbour, over eighty club moorings, platform parking, fuelling, watering and crane-lifting ensure that we are excellently equipped to cater for all the needs of the contemporary sailor. 

History

Although there are references to an active ‘club’ prior to 1870, history records that the present clubhouse was erected in 1870 at a cost of £4,000 to a design by William Sterling and the Kingstown Royal Harbour Boat Club was registered with Lloyds in the same year. By 1872 the name had been changed to the Kingston Harbour Boat Club and this change was registered at Lloyds.

In 1881 the premises were purchased by a Captain Peacocke and others who formed a proprietary club called the Kingstown Harbour Yacht Club again registered at Lloyds. Some six years later in 1877 the building again changed hands being bought by a Mr Charles Barrington. and between 1877 and 1901 the club was very active and operated for a while as the 'Absolute Club' although this change of name was never registered. In 1901 the lease was purchased by three trustees who registered it as the Edward Yacht Club.

In 1930 at a time when the Edward Yacht Club was relatively inactive, a committee including The Earl of Granard approached the trustees with a proposition to form the National Yacht Club. The Earl of Granard had been Commodore of the North Shannon YC and was a senator in the W.T. Cosgrave government. An agreement was reached, the National Yacht Club was registered at Lloyds, and The Earl of Granard became the first Commodore.

Sterling’s design for the exterior of the club was a hybrid French Chateau and eighteenth century Garden Pavilion and today as a Class A restricted building it continues to provide elegant dining and bar facilities. An early drawing of the building shows viewing balconies on the roof and the waterfront façade.

Subsequent additions of platforms and a new slip to the seaward side and most recently the construction of new changing rooms, offices and boathouse provide state of the art facilities, capable of coping with major international and world championship events. The club provides a wide range of sailing facilities, from Junior training to family cruising, dinghy sailing to offshore racing and caters for most major classes of dinghies, one design keelboats, sports boats and cruiser racers. It provides training facilities within the ISA Youth Sailing Scheme and National Power Boat Schemes.

The club is particularly active in dinghy and keelboat one design racing and has hosted two World Championships in recent years including the Flying Fifteen Worlds in 2003.

Berths with diesel, water, power and overnight facilities are available to cruising yachtsmen with shopping facilities being a short walk away. The club is active throughout the year with full dining and bar facilities and winter activities include bridge, snooker, quiz nights, wine tasting and special events.

Membership – enquiries may be addressed to: The Membership Secretary, The National Yacht Club – email: [email protected]  

Reciprocal Clubs – The National Yacht Club has formal reciprocal membership arrangements with other clubs in Ireland and overseas. National Yacht Club members are welcome to visit our partner clubs and on introduction with the National Yacht Club membership card, our members may use the facilities of the host club subject to that club’s house rules. Likewise members of our reciprocal clubs are most welcome to visit the National Yacht Club where they may enjoy our facilities in the company of like-minded members.

Courses Offered – DINGHY: Up to Improving Skills, Advanced Boat Handling, Racing 1, Kites & Wires 1, and Adventure 1. POWERBOAT: 1, 2, and Safety Boat. KEELBOAT: Up to Improving Skills, Advanced Boat Handling, Racing 1, Kites & Wires 1, and Adventure 1.

(Details and photograph courtesy of the National Yacht Club) 

National Yacht Club, Harbour Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01 280 5725, fax: 01 280 7837, email: [email protected] or [email protected]

 

Published in Clubs

rstgyc

 

History

The Kingstown Boat Club, from which the Royal St. George Yacht Club evolved, was founded in 1838 by a small group of boating enthusiasts who had decided that ‘the (River) Liffey was every year becoming fouler and less agreeable for aquatic pursuits’.

They applied to the Commissioner for Public Works, and were granted a piece of ground near Dun Laoghaire Harbour on which to build a clubhouse – the first privately owned building to stand on publicly owned space. Initially, the members’ main interest was in rowing, but membership grew rapidly, and amongst them were many well-known yachtsmen of the day.

One of these was the Marquis Conyngham, who used his influence with Queen Victoria to have the privileges of a Royal Yacht Club conferred in 1845. The Club flag was to be 'the Red Ensign with a crown in the centre of the Jack' and the Burgee was red with a white cross with a crown at the centre. This, of course, is the St. George’s Cross, and is quite possibly the reason why, in 1847, the Club became The Royal St. George’s Yacht Club, although this has never been established. It subsequently became the Royal St George Yacht Club; it is referred to by all who know it, as simply ‘the George’. 

Click for the latest Royal St.George Yacht Club news

The Clubhouse

The clubhouse was designed by Mulvany, a follower of Gandon, designer of the Custom House in Dublin, and he produced a beautiful miniature Palladian villa in the neo-classical style.

The builder was Masterson, who built many other beautiful houses in the neighbourhood, including Sorrento Terrace, Dalkey. Work was completed in 1843, but, incredibly, such was the growth in membership, that the clubhouse was already too small. Permission was granted by the Harbour Commissioners in 1845 for an extension of the original façade, which involved clever duplication of the existing Ionic portico with the erection of a linking colonnade between. The symmetry and classical grace of the clubhouse was thus preserved in the new building.

The George has a long tradition of racing and cruising, and members have, from the start, made their mark in home and international waters. In 1851, the Marquis Conyngham, Commodore, competed in his 218 ton yacht Constance in the Royal Yacht Squadron Regatta. An American yacht called America won the race! In 1893 William Jameson, of the eponymous distilling family, was asked by Edward, Prince of Wales, to be sailing master on his new yacht Britannia. He won 33 out of 43 starts in her first season.

In 1963 a major restoration project was undertaken to repair and update the Club’s facilities, and this attracted a large number of new members who were ultimately to pave the way for the later developments, including a much-envied multi-purpose club room, a state-of-the-art forecourt extension for dinghies and keelboats, and a fully-equipped dock.

2008 saw the culmination of five years of planning and building when the new sailing wing was opened for use. Consisting of a new junior room, racing office, committee room and administration office this area is joined to the older builing with a lovely light-filled atrium. Stylish and functional changing facilities for the ladies and upgraded male changerooms have increased the club’s capacity to accommodate larger numbers of sailors for world-class events. A refurbishment of the Clubroom further complimented this full-service sailing section and has elevated the Club’s status resulting in it being chosen to host the 2012 ISAF Youth World Championships.

(Details and image courtesy of the Royal St. George Yacht Club)

 
Royal St. George Yacht Club, Harbour Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin, tel: +353 1 280 1811, fax: +353 1 280 9359 

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

Published in Clubs
Page 14 of 15

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