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Displaying items by tag: lifeguards

The RNLI lifeguard team are returning to patrol seven beaches along the Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland over the upcoming Easter period.

The lifeguard service is also adjusting its operational hours this season from 10am to 6pm each day.

From Good Friday (29 March) to Sunday 7 April, lifeguards will be providing a patrol on Benone Strand, Portrush West Strand, Portrush East Strand, Whiterocks and Ballycastle, while they will have a patrol on Portstewart Strand over the weekend period from Good Friday to Easter Monday.

Following the Easter period, the RNLI lifeguard team working with the Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council and the National Trust will then prepare for the peak season in June.

A weekend service on Saturdays and Sundays on the same beaches will commence on 4 May to 30 June before daily patrols for the summer season start on Monday 1 July.

Speaking ahead of the Easter break, Michael Thompson, RNLI regional lifeguard lead said: “Our lifeguards have been working hard in recent weeks during their inductions to prepare themselves for being back on our beaches next week. This has included refreshing their lifeguard skills, doing fitness tests, vehicle courses and casualty care.

“The team is now looking forward to getting back on to the beaches and putting that training into action. Throughout the upcoming season, our lifeguards will assist numerous individuals.

“It’s crucial to recognise that their role extends beyond rescue operations; they’re also there to offer beach safety guidance. Don’t hesitate to approach them for advice, ensuring a safe and enjoyable day for all.

“Early risers will be pleased to know that they will be able to enjoy our beaches with a lifeguard patrol an hour earlier than usual in the morning with a new time start of 10am.”

Steven Callaghan, Mayor of Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council added: “As my chosen Mayor’s charity during my time in office, I am delighted that council continues its partnership with RNLI and we welcome the return of beach lifeguards over the Easter period.

“Our beaches remain a valued outdoor asset enjoyed by both locals and visitors, the RNLI helps to ensure everyone has an enjoyable and safe visit to the borough and we thank them for the lifesaving service they provide.”

Meanwhile, the RNLI is urging anyone visiting the coast this summer to make sure they keep themselves and their families safe by following their beach safety advice:

  • Visit a lifeguarded beach and swim between the red and yellow flags.
  • Check the weather forecast, tide times and read local hazard signage to understand local risks.
  • For activities like paddle boarding or kayaking, wear a wetsuit with a buoyancy aid or lifejacket and carry a means of calling for help in a waterproof pouch and keep it on you. Tell someone what you are doing, where you are going and when you expect to return.
  • If you are going open water swimming, use a wetsuit to keep you warm, wear a brightly coloured swim hat and take a tow float to store personal items including a phone for emergencies.
  • If you fall into the water unexpectedly, FLOAT TO LIVE. Fight your instinct to thrash around, lean back, extend your arms and legs, and Float.
  • In an emergency dial 999 in NI and ask for the coastguard.

If you are interested in working on the beach this summer, there are still lifeguard positions available. You will receive world-class lifesaving training, enjoy good rates of pay, the possibility of flexible working patterns and develop valuable skills for your future career. Find out more about becoming a lifeguard at rnli.org/BeALifeguard.

Published in Water Safety

The RNLI is on the lookout for budding lifeguards to launch their lifesaving careers on some of the most popular beaches in Scotland, Northern Ireland and elsewhere in the UK.

Recruitment for this season’s lifeguard team has started nationally in preparation for providing local authorities and landowners with the service they request to keep the nation’s beachgoers safe this summer.

The charity’s lifeguards not only rescue those in difficulty in the water, they also provide vital beach first-aid and safety advice to ensure visitors can return home safely.

In 2022, RNLI lifeguards provided patrols and responded to more than 18,000 incidents, helping more than 24,000 people in need and saving 117 lives.

Last summer, lifeguards plucked stricken swimmers from powerful rip currents, saved children being blown offshore in inflatables, came to the aid of paddle-boarders and gave lifesaving CPR on beaches among the thousands of incidents they attended.

Successful applicants will receive world-class lifesaving training, enjoy good rates of pay, the possibility of flexible working patterns and develop valuable skills for a future career.

Lachlan Edwards, lead lifeguard supervisor for Scotland said: “To anyone thinking of becoming a lifeguard, just do it. It’s the best job, it’s so rewarding, and it keeps getting better – there’s so much opportunity for growth in the role.

“I love being outside on the beach all summer and sharing my knowledge with people. It often doesn’t feel like a job because I enjoy it so much, which is something a lot of lifeguards say.”

Lee Fisher, lifeguard experience manager said: “Beach lifeguarding is a great opportunity and a very rewarding role that changes lives — including your own — all whilst enjoying the beach as your office.

“Our lifeguards range from teenagers all the way up to lifesavers in their 70s, as long as you meet the fitness requirements and you are over 16 years old, there could be a role for you.

“The job also has great paths for progression — we have lifeguards who have been working for the RNLI for years, both on the beach and as part of our support teams, and the skills you gain can make an ideal first step towards many careers. It’s a great opportunity whether you want a rewarding summer job or to pursue a career in lifesaving.”

Find out more about becoming a lifeguard at rnli.org/BeALifeguard.

Published in Water Safety

On Wednesday (12 July) Portrush RNLI’s inshore lifeboat crew carried out a joint simulation exercise with RNLI lifeguards on the East Strand in Portrush, on Northern Ireland’s Causeway Coast.

The exercise was a simulation of a sea swimmer who had suffered a heart attack while swimming.

The lifeguards performed a rescue to recover unconscious casualty, bringing the person to shore and performing casualty care, while the inshore lifeboat recovered another swimmer who was conscious.

Both teams continued performing rounds of CPR and defibrillation before the exercise came to a close.

Beni McAllister, lifeboat operations manager at Portrush RNLI said: “This simulation demonstrated the good collaboration and great working relationship between the volunteer lifeboat crew and the RNLI lifeguards.

“We hope this will be the first of many similar exercises, as we work closely together during the summer months. Exercises like this can only enhance that vital relationship.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Lifeguards from the RNLI return to beaches in Northern Ireland this week as the charity, Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council and National Trust prepare and get ready for another busy season.

From this Good Friday (7 April) through to Sunday 16 April, lifeguards will be providing a patrol from 11am to 7pm on Benone Strand, Portrush West Strand, Portrush East Strand, Whiterocks and Ballycastle and from 10am to 6pm on Portstewart Strand.

Last summer RNLI lifeguards in Northern Ireland saved 13 lives, aided over 450 people and responded to over 300 incidents as over 650,000 people visit a RNLI lifeguarded beach in NI in 2022.

The RNLI works in partnership with Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council, the National Trust and Newry, Mourne and Down District Council each year to set up and roll out a lifeguard service at their request.

Before a lifeguard sets foot on a beach, they take part in months of training. From a rigorous fitness test to learning vital casualty care skills, it takes a lot of hard work, dedication and commitment in order to save lives at the beach. 

As well as rescuing those in trouble in the water, RNLI lifeguards have to deal with multiple lost children, minor first aids including cuts and stings, major first aids including fractures and critical illnesses and provide safety advice to beachgoers to ensure they enjoyed their day at the beach as safely as possible. 

Michael Thompson, RNLI regional lifeguard lead said: “RNLI lifeguards are at the forefront of the charity’s lifesaving work, as they keep beach visitors safe across the Causeway Coast and in Co Down. Last year’s figures show the importance of our lifeguards and what they do for the public, we are expecting coastal areas to be just as busy in the summer season ahead.

“The RNLI has been working closely with the councils, the National Trust and local communities to ensure the beaches and lifeguard units are ready and equipped, and that lifeguard training has been performed seamlessly.

“Pre-season preparations have gone well, and our lifeguards are looking forward to getting back on the beaches and doing what they do best; offering preventative safety advice to visitors and rescuing those in difficulty in the water or on the beach itself.

“However, it is important to remember that our lifeguards can’t be everywhere. Our lifeguards will be supported by the charity’s 24/7 lifeboat service and water safety work, but we urge anyone visiting the coast to take responsibility for themselves and their family this summer.”

Both Causeway Coast and Glens and Newry, Mourne and Down District Councils and the National Trust invest each year in keeping their beach visitors safe by contributing to RNLI costs, which helps to meet lifeguard wages, while the extensive training and equipment needed is provided by the charity through public donations. RNLI lifeguards work alongside other emergency services and teams integral to an enjoyable visit to the beach.

Meanwhile, the RNLI is urging anyone visiting the coast this summer to make sure they keep themselves and their families safe by following their beach safety advice:

  • Visit a lifeguarded beach and swim between the red and yellow flags.
  • Check the weather forecast, tide times and read local hazard signage to understand local risks.
  • For activities like paddle boarding or kayaking, wear a wetsuit with a buoyancy aid or lifejacket and carry a means of calling for help in a waterproof pouch and keep it on you. Tell someone what you are doing, where you are going and when you expect to return.
  • If you are going open water swimming, use a wetsuit to keep you warm, wear a brightly coloured swim hat and take a tow float to store personal items including a phone for emergencies
  • If you fall into the water unexpectedly, FLOAT TO LIVE. Fight your instinct to thrash around, lean back, extend your arms and legs, and Float.
  • In an emergency dial 999 in NI and ask for the coastguard.

In addition, the RNLI is still recruiting for lifeguard positions for anyone interested. You will receive world-class lifesaving training, enjoy good rates of pay, the possibility of flexible working patterns and develop valuable skills for their future career. Find out more about becoming a lifeguard at rnli.org/BeALifeguard.

Ireland’s top Lifeguards will compete at Water Safety Ireland’s National Surf Lifesaving Championships at Rossnowlagh Beach, Donegal, from 9 am, Saturday.

Competitors will gather from counties nationwide and will include competitors from Ireland’s International Lifesaving Team who will compete in the World Lifesaving Championships in Italy later this month.

Competitors at the National Championships will have their skills tested in events that simulate emergency swimming rescue scenarios. Teams will fend off strong competition from the fittest Lifeguards nationwide in this gala of lifesaving - the most significant life-saving competition in Ireland. Ireland's best Lifesavers will contend with the challenging open water conditions on the Donegal coast to rescue potential “casualties” in testing swim races, rescue board races and other events, which culminate in exciting finals throughout the day.

Commenting on the additional challenges of open water competitions, the Chairman of Water Safety Ireland Clare McGrath, is confident of the team’s readiness for the challenge. “Athletes will not only compete with each other while using their life-saving equipment but also with the open water conditions of Rossnowlagh Beach as they vie for National Championship medals.”

“The Sport of Lifesaving has been developed to improve the standard of lifeguarding in Ireland. The skills they have honed will demonstrate their lifesaving skills that can be such an important lifeline in an emergency. Many competitors work as Lifeguards and rescue hundreds of people at risk of drowning.”

“Water Safety Ireland trains Lifeguards employed by local authorities at beaches, lakes, rivers and pools nationwide. We encourage the public to learn to swim and enrol in one of the many courses nationwide in the valuable skills of water survival and lifesaving."

"Take your family down to these Championships and enjoy a festival of lifesaving that may very well encourage you or a member of your family to learn these lifesaving skills.”

Published in Water Safety
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RNLI systems technician Euan Noble was enjoying his weekend off at Portrush’s East Strand when his girlfriend Charlotte spotted two children struggling in the water on Sunday afternoon (21 August).

Euan, an experienced surfer who works to maintain the mechanics of lifeguard equipment in the Ballymoney RNLI Support Centre, knew that there was a rip current in that area of the bay next to the Arcadia building.

Back on shore, RNLI lifeguard Luca, who was on patrol along the East Strand on Northern Ireland’s Causeway Coast, also noticed the children struggling with bodyboards by the rocks.

Luca radioed RNLI lifeguards Michael and Jenna, who were out on a paddleboard exercise. Michael started to paddle out to the rocks, about 200 metres away from the black-and-white-flagged area where Euan had been surfing.

Jenna went back to shore and ran along the water’s edge before picking up a rescue board to swim out to help Euan and Michael.

Euan could see the lifeguards respond but based on his own location in the water he knew that he would reach the children first, so he quickly paddled around to them.

He reached out to the young girl in the water and managed to pull her up and out of the rip current, onto his own surfboard.

In the meantime, the girl’s brother had managed to get himself up onto the rocks, so Euan manoeuvred his board around to him where they could safely stay until the lifeguards reached them.

Lifeguards Michael and Jenna arrived on scene and carried out casualty care for some minor injuries before getting the children back to shore on the rescue boards.

Given the strength of the rip, Michael held the boy under the arms and waded to shore with the rescue board over the rocky coastline.

On his impromptu role change from technician to lifesaver, Euan said: “I’ve been caught out by this particular rip current before, they are unpredictable and they can catch you very quickly, these things do happen.

“I usually work with lifeguard equipment, and I’ve never been a lifeguard, so my priority was getting the children into the hands of the lifeguards as safely as possible.

“I am an experienced surfer and familiar with the sea state around this area. Luckily, the children were at a lifeguarded beach, where they could be rescued quickly.”

RNLI lifeguard Michael also notes the dangers of the rip current by Arcadia, saying: “This spot, at the rocks near the corner of the bay by the Arcadia building, is dangerous for bathing because of this strong, permanent rip current.

“When you visit a lifeguarded beach, always check the flags. The area safest for swimming and bodyboarding is always between the red-and-yellow flags, and the area safest for paddleboarding and surfing is always between the black-and-white flags.

“I’m proud of our RNLI team, that includes my lifeguarding colleagues and our staff, in [Sunday’s] rescue that was Euan who knew what to do to support us.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

RNLI lifeguards in Northern Ireland have saved four people in two separate incidents during a busy week on Causeway Coast beaches.

Two teenage girls were rescued after being pulled out to sea in a rip current, and on the same day a man who had disappeared beneath the waves was pulled to safety along with his son.

In the first incident, RNLI lifeguard Luke was patrolling East Strand beach in Portrush on a rescue water craft (RWC) when lifeguards were alerted by a member of the public to two teenage girls being pulled out by a rip current at Curran Point, the section between East Strand and neighbouring beach Whiterocks.

Rip currents are strong currents running out to sea which can quickly drag people away from the shallows of the shoreline and out to deeper water.

Although the weather was hot and sunny, Luke had to manoeuvre the RWC through choppy waves to get to the reported location of the casualties.

Reaching the teenage girls, Luke saw they were distressed, and they were both struggling to breathe. He pulled the first girl onto the rescue sled at the back of the RWC and then assisted the second girl to climb on as she was very weak.

Luke then brought the girls back to shore and helped them onto the beach and into the care of RNLI lifeguard Emily who treated them for shock.

Speaking after the rescue, Emily said: “Rip currents are very unpredictable. You could walk out five metres into the one at Curran Point and you would lose your footing, it is so strong.

“If you are caught in a rip current, do not try to swim against it or you’ll exhaust yourself. Instead, if you can, swim parallel to the shore until you’re free of the rip and head to shore. Always raise your hand and shout for help.

“We want people to enjoy the water safely by making sure that they come to lifeguarded beaches and swim between the red and yellow flags.”

Luke added: “This rescue proves just how vital our equipment is. The girls were quickly drifting down the beach, almost out of our sight and we would not have made it out to them quickly enough without the RWC.

“Rip currents are an ever-present danger, so we patrol in the water, as well as on shore, to keep everyone safe.”

On the same day, at Benone Beach farther west along the Causeway Coast, lifeguard Andrzej had just helped bring a body boarder back to the safe area between the flags.

He then patrolled down towards the Umbra, the minor river which flows across Benone’s bathing beach and noticed two heads in the water about 500 metres out of the safe swimming zone.

One of them heard the engine of the RWC and raised his arm to signal for help. As Andrzej circled round to go to the rescue, he noticed one of the two men had sunk beneath the water.

Using his hands, Andrzej managed to pull him onto the rescue sled and then reached out to get the second casualty, who he later learned was the first man’s son. The son was struggling, but managing to keep his head above water, so Andrzej pulled him onto the sled also.

With both men onboard the rescue sled, Andrzej headed back to shore where he beached the rescue craft. Andrzej and the man’s son helped get his father onto the sand where they sat him down. Andrzej called his fellow RNLI lifeguards for medical assistance and they administrated oxygen to the casualty.

Speaking after the rescue, Andrzej said: “In the heat of the moment, my training kicked in and I just wanted to get them back on to the sand.

“It could have been a very serious situation if I hadn’t seen them out swimming, and if the son hadn’t raised his arm for help. When you swim at the beach, try to stay as close to the lifeguarded patrol zone as possible, so we can see you and get to you as quickly as we can.

“Luckily, the son knew what to do and did the right thing. If you get into difficulty in the water, lean back, stretch out your arms and legs, then call for help or raise your arm.”

Published in Water Safety

Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council is now recruiting qualified lifeguards for its beaches for the 2022 summer season.

The DLRCoCo website lists qualifications and details for the role, which pays a wage of €12.18 per hour (plus appropriate differentials) for a Junior Lifeguard and €14.92 per hour (plus appropriate differentials) for a Senior Lifeguard.

Candidates must be over 17 years of age as of 13 May 2022 and hold the Beach Lifeguard Award/Qualification of the Irish Water Safety Association or Royal Lifesaving Society (Ireland) or equivalent. The award must not be more than two years old and must be valid for the entire bathing season.

Completed application forms should be emailed to [email protected] no later than 12 noon on Thursday 23 June.

Published in Jobs
Tagged under

The RNLI has revealed lifeguard statistics from 2021 which show more people than ever visited a lifeguarded beach in Northern Ireland and needed the help of the charity’s lifesavers.

During the season, lifeguard teams located on 11 beaches along the Causeway Coast and in county Down, responded to 330 incidents, coming to the aid of 384 people, one of whom was a life saved. The lifeguards carried out thousands of preventative actions over the summer period which saw an estimated 860,883 visitors.

The latest figures come as RNLI lifeguards train and prepare to return to beaches for the 2022 season.

The range of people and activities lifeguards responded to included paddleboarders, body boarders, swimmers, jet-skiers, those spending time relaxing or walking, quad bikers, kayakers, surfers, paddlers and those on inflatables.

Every year, RNLI lifeguards are involved in carrying out water rescues, administering casualty care, delivering water safety information, and helping to reunite missing children with their families. Over the past few weeks, they have been training and practicing their skills so that they are ready to face what the upcoming season brings.

The RNLI Lifeguard Station at Castlerock Beach in The RNLI Lifeguard Station at Castlerock Beach in County Derry

The RNLI will carry out its usual lifeguard service this year across Northern Ireland in its standard phased approach. The first set of beaches will go on service from this Good Friday, 15 April, for the Easter holidays. Lifeguards will patrol beaches at Benone, Portrush East Strand, Portrush West Strand, Whiterocks and Ballycastle from 11am to 7pm and Portstewart from 10am-6pm daily until Sunday 24 April.

A weekend service on these beaches will commence on Saturday 30 April and will run until the peak daily season starts on Saturday 25 June. Meanwhile, a weekend service on Tyrella Beach in county Down will start from 10am to 6pm on Saturday 30 April. 

Speaking ahead of the Easter lifeguard service commencing, Karl O’Neill, RNLI Lead Lifeguard Supervisor said: ‘RNLI lifeguards are at the forefront of the charity’s lifesaving work, as they keep beach visitors safe across the Causeway Coast and in county Down each year. Last year’s figures show the importance of our lifeguards and what they do for the public. We are expecting coastal areas to be just as busy in the summer season ahead.

‘The RNLI has been working closely with partners and local communities to ensure beaches and lifeguard units are ready and equipped, and that lifeguard training has been performed seamlessly.

‘Pre-season preparations have gone well, and our lifeguards are ready to get back on to the beaches and do what they do best; offering preventative safety advice to visitors and rescuing those in difficulty in the water or on the beach itself.

‘However, it is important to remember that our lifeguards can’t be everywhere. Our lifeguards will be supported by the charity’s 24/7 lifeboat service and water safety work, but we urge anyone visiting the coast to take responsibility for themselves and their family.’

Conard McCullough, RNLI Lead Lifeguard Supervisor added: ‘Heading to coastal waters is a great way to have fun and stay active, especially during the summer months. But weather conditions can change quickly and, if you’re not careful, you can easily get caught out.

‘It is important that anyone visiting the coast understands the hazards of the environment. It can be an unpredictable environment, particularly during early summer when the risk of cold water shock significantly increases, as air temperatures warm but water temperatures remain dangerously cold. We would remind anyone entering the water to take extra care and avoid unnecessary risks as early season conditions are more challenging.

‘Taking basic precautions can greatly reduce the risk of getting into difficulty and improve your chance of being found quickly should you need rescuing. With this in mind, we urge beach visitors to come dressed appropriately to ensure your visit is both safe and enjoyable. For activities like paddleboarding, we’d recommend you wear a wetsuit, as it will keep you warm in an emergency. Wearing an appropriate buoyancy aid or lifejacket is also vital as is carrying a means of calling for help such as a mobile phone in a waterproof pouch.’

The RNLI is urging anyone visiting the coast this Easter to make sure they keep themselves and their families safe by following beach safety advice:

  • Visit a lifeguarded beach and swim between the red and yellow flags
  • Check the weather forecast, tide times and read local hazard signage to understand local risks
  • Keep a close eye on your family – on the beach and in the water – don’t allow your family to swim alone
  • If you fall into water unexpectedly, float to live. Fight your instinct to thrash around, lean back, extend your arms and legs, and float.
  • In an emergency, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard.
Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under

The RNLI has launched its search for budding new lifeguards to start their career on some of Northern Ireland’s most popular beaches, as applications open for 2022.

Recruitment for this season’s team of RNLI beach lifesavers on the Causeway Coast and in County Down has opened, ready for the summer season. As well as rescuing those in difficulty, the RNLI’s beach lifeguards promote safe behaviour so visitors can return home safely.

Lifeguards are needed for beaches at Benone, Downhill, Castlerock, Portstewart, Portrush West, Portrush East, Whiterocks and Ballycastle on the Causeway Coast and at Tyrella, Murlough and Cranfield in county Down.

Successful applicants will receive world-class lifesaving training, enjoy good rates of pay and develop valuable skills for a future career.

Karl O’Neill, RNLI Lead Lifeguard Supervisor said: ‘Lifeguarding is a really unique and rewarding role and if you’re thinking about applying, I would really recommend you go for it. You can gain some invaluable skills and training whilst working on the beach and being part of an incredible team.

‘If you enjoy working in a challenging environment, have the ability to work under pressure and you like helping others, it really is a job you will love.’

Conard McCullagh, RNLI Lead Lifeguard Supervisor added: ‘The skills our lifeguards gain can be an ideal first step towards many career paths or offer invaluable experience for those studying or training in a similar field.

‘Beach lifeguarding can be a great opportunity and a very rewarding role. You could change lives – including your own – all whilst enjoying the beach as your office. As long as you can meet the fitness requirements, pass the interview and you are over school leaving age, there can be a role for you as a lifesaver.

‘We have lifeguards who have been working for the RNLI for years, both on the beach and as part of our support teams. It really is a great opportunity.’

Find out more about how you can help to improve the safety of a community and apply to be part of our amazing lifesaving team at rnli.org/BeALifeguard.

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boot Düsseldorf, the International Boat Show

With almost 250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair and every year in January the “meeting place" for the entire industry. Around 2,000 exhibitors present their interesting new products, attractive further developments and maritime equipment. This means that the complete market will be on site in Düsseldorf and will be inviting visitors on nine days of the fair to an exciting journey through the entire world of water sports in 17 exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology, equipment and accessories, services, canoes, kayaks, kitesurfing, rowing, diving, surfing, wakeboarding, windsurfing, SUP, fishing, maritime art, marinas, water sports facilities as well as beach resorts and charter, there is something for every water sports enthusiast.

boot Düsseldorf FAQs

boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair. Seventeen exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology.

The Fairground Düsseldorf. This massive Dusseldorf Exhibition Centre is strategically located between the River Rhine and the airport. It's about 20 minutes from the airport and 20 minutes from the city centre.

250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair.

The 2018 show was the golden jubilee of the show, so 2021 will be the 51st show.

Every year in January. In 2021 it will be 23-31 January.

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Messeplatz 40474 Düsseldorf Tel: +49 211 4560-01 Fax: +49 211 4560-668

The Irish marine trade has witnessed increasing numbers of Irish attendees at boot over the last few years as the 17-Hall show becomes more and more dominant in the European market and direct flights from Dublin offer the possibility of day trips to the river Rhine venue.

Boats & Yachts Engines, Engine parts Yacht Equipment Watersports Services Canoes, Kayaks, Rowing Waterski, Wakeboard, Kneeboard & Skimboard Jetski + Equipment & Services Diving, Surfing, Windsurfing, Kite Surfing & SUP Angling Maritime Art & Crafts Marinas & Watersports Infrastructure Beach Resorts Organisations, Authorities & Clubs

Over 1000 boats are on display.

©Afloat 2020

boot Düsseldorf 2025 

The 2025 boot Düsseldorf will take place from 18 to 26 January 2025.

At A Glance – Boot Dusseldorf 

Organiser
Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz
40474 Düsseldorf
Tel: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668

The first boats and yachts will once again be arriving in December via the Rhine.

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