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Displaying items by tag: World Sailing

Olympic gold medalists Hannah Mills MBE (GBR) and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR) were voted female 2021 Rolex World Sailor of the Year on Thursday 2, December in a virtual ceremony streamed live from the Royal Yacht Squadron in Cowes, UK.

Australia’s Tom Slingsby has won the male 2021 Rolex World Sailor of the Year in celebration of his achievements in three competitive classes over the past two years.

Mills and McIntyre claimed gold in Tokyo in the 470 class, a victory that made Mills the most successful female Olympic sailor of all time. This was her second Olympic gold, repeating her victory from Rio 2016 with her new partner. McIntyre won her first gold medal in Tokyo and followed in the footsteps of her father, Michael, who won gold at the 1988 Games in Seoul. The pair received 37% of the votes, making them the clear choice for this year’s female Rolex World Sailor of the Year award.

Multi-discipline champion Tom Slingsby named male Rolex World Sailor of the Year 2021Multi-discipline champion Tom Slingsby named male Rolex World Sailor of the Year 2021

Slingsby secured 29% of the votes after defending his Moth World Championship, winning 13 of the 14 races, securing back-to-back 2019 and 2021 title wins. He has also set the standard in the global SailGP circuit, earning the season 1 title as Team CEO and Skipper of TeamAustralia, which is also currently top of the series leaderboard with just two events remaining in season 2. He capped a fantastic year on the water by being part of the crew of ‘Comanche’, winners of the 2021 Rolex Middle Sea Race.

A record-breaking 40,000 votes were cast this year to honour the achievements of sailors across all disciplines.

Speaking live at the awards ceremony, Hannah Mills, who is also a sustainability ambassador for the International Olympic Committee said, "I am completely blown away. The lineup this year was absolutely incredible. I am so proud of Eilidh for everything she put into this Olympic campaign, she was the absolute best teammate. I am really honoured. I feel privileged to be a female in sailing right now, there are so many opportunities out there. I really hope to be a part of forging the pathway for female sailors of today and for the future. It is inspirational to be part of a federation like World Sailing who take sustainability so seriously and I feel so lucky to be involved in such an amazing sport."

Eilidh McIntyre added, "I just want to say thank you to Hannah, and everyone for voting for us and for all of your support. We wouldn’t be here without all of the amazing women pushing us."

Tom Slingsby said, "This is a huge honour for me. Thank you to everyone who voted. I remember when I was 15 years old, I wrote down my career goals and it was to win the Olympic Gold medal, win the America’s Cup and win World Sailor of the Year. I am very fortunate, this is the second time I have won the World Sailor of the Year award. I am so lucky to be in the position I am and to get these amazing opportunities. Congratulations to all the other guys, there were some unbelievable sailors nominated this year."

Published in World Sailing
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Sailing joins thousands around the world in pledging to be net-zero by 2050, aligning sport with the goals of the Paris Agreement and accelerating efforts to address climate change.

Continuing its commitment to taking a leading role in sustainability and reducing emissions in sport, World Sailing has signed up to ‘Race To Zero’, the global campaign to cut emissions to zero run by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

World Sailing was one of the founders of the UN’s Sports for Climate Action Framework and has been diligently working towards climate targets from its Sustainability Agenda 2030. Working closely with the International Olympic Committee (IOC), over 280 sports federations including FIFA, the IBU, Formula E and the Organising Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games Paris 2024 have committed to reporting on their climate impact and a strategy to reduce emissions following new targets set by the UN’s Sports for Climate Action framework.

Quanhai Li, World Sailing President, said, "World Sailing is proud to stand with the United Nations, the IOC, our partners and organisations around the world in taking decisive action on climate change. We have been making positive progress towards clear targets in all aspects of the sport with our own sustainability targets and internal studies to determine our carbon footprint and where we can improve. Support for this initiative has been overwhelmingly positive and it is our responsibility to do everything in our power to make a difference. The effects of climate change cannot be ignored but if we act now and act together through bold collective action, we can mitigate the impact and help to restore the balance between people and the planet."

David Graham, World Sailing Chief Executive Officer, said, "The future of sailing is delicately tied to climate change. Rising sea levels, higher temperatures and more extreme weather puts sailors at greater risk, reduces participation time and impacts grassroots infrastructure. As a responsible federation we must do all we can do reduce the effects of climate change for the long-term survival of our sport, sailors and communities around the world. We have already committed to coordinating strategic action in the sport by ensuring our sponsors, events and equipment all follows the targets set by the World Sailing Sustainability Agenda 2030. This is an important campaign for the future of our planet and we are proud to sign the pledge."

The World Sailing Executive Office has already taken steps to become carbon neutral by 2022, halving emissions across the sport by 2030 and aiming to achieve net zero by 2040 in all operations.

So far, around 70% of the world’s economy has pledged to reach net zero emissions. More than 80 countries have updated their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) to reduce emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Race To Zero is the largest ever alliance committed to hitting net zero carbon emissions by 2050, already representing a coalition of 733 cities, 31 regions, 3,067 businesses, 173 of the biggest investors and 622 Higher Education Institutions. By the time COP26 concludes, the aim is that signatories for Race To Zero will account for 25% of global carbon dioxide emissions.

Efforts to make sailing carbon-positive are already well established. World Sailing partnered with 11th Hour Racing in 2018 to recognise success in maritime sustainability through sponsorship of the World Sailing 11th Hour Racing Sustainability Award which has attracted more than 100 entries and 10,000 votes each year. 11th Hour Racing are a founding partner of the ‘Racing with Purpose’ programme created by The Ocean Race which contributes to scientific understanding of ocean health by using racing boats to collect data on sea surface temperature and ocean acidification.

Hempel, World Sailing’s official coatings partner and sponsor of the Hempel Sailing World Championships, joining the more than 1,000 international companies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

SAP, World Sailing’s long-time analytics partner, has launched its Chasing Zero Emissions programme to assist businesses minimise greenhouse gas footprint with embedded analytics.

In 2020, SailGP launched ‘Race for the Future’, the first climate-positive sports and entertainment property, which aims to reduce the league’s carbon footprint, champion inclusivity and advocate for clean energy. SailGP tracks and verifies carbon emissions in partnership with One Carbon World and offsets emissions by contributing to pioneering Blue Carbon Projects such as the goal to plant a billion trees and mitigating 500 million tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere, delivered in partnership with the Worldview International Foundation.

Published in World Sailing
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Inside the Games has reported that World Sailing’s deficit for 2020 was lower than expected — and that it expects a similar dividend from the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo to what it received five years ago from Rio 2016.

Sailing’s world governing body says the “successful delivery” of Tokyo 2020 this summer after a year’s delay enforced by the COVID-19 pandemic had “alleviated the critical financial risks associated with the cancellation of the Games”.

The body’s accounts also included confirmation of an arrangements to borrow $3.1 million (€2.7 million) from the IOC, repayable without interest over five years from this December.

Inside the Games has much more on the story HERE.

Published in World Sailing

An exciting final day in Palermo, Italy, saw medals awarded in all four categories at the 2021 Hansa World Championships.

Over 180 sailors from 25 nations showed exceptional technical para sailing and determination in extremely changeable conditions all week.

Sailors from seven countries made their international competition debut in Sicily as para sailing continues to go from strength to strength.

Racing was interrupted by rain on the first day but the weather improved throughout the week, leading to an intense weekend of racing.

In the Hansa 303 Single class, Piotr Cichocki (POL) led throughout to seal victory from Cecile Venuat (FRA) and Rory McKinna (GBR) in the overall rankings. Violeta Del Reino (ESP) finished first in the women’s competition – eighth overall - ahead of Olga Górnaś-Grudzień (POL) in second, 13th overall, and Miray Ulas (TUR) in third, 17th overall.

The team of Symonds-Klinger (AUS) claimed victory in the final race, finishing ahead of Górnaś-Grudzień-Cichocki (POL) by just one point in the Hansa 303 Double class. The team of Guyon-Ducruix (FRA) finished third.

In the Hansa Liberty class, Vera Voorbach (NED) won by three points from Gerard Eychenne (FRA), who ended the races ahead of Paul Phillips (GBR) by a single point. It was a Netherlands clean sweep in the Hansa Liberty Servo class. Vera Voorbach finished first ahead of teammate Hanneke Deenen in second and Wilma Van Den Broek in third.

Jan Sefke Holtrop (NED) finished ahead of Cedric Castaldi (FRA) in the Men’s Liberty Servo classification.

Star of the week was Piotr Cichocki (POL) who won four out of five races to finish 10 points ahead of second place in the Hansa 303 Single class and 18 points ahead of third.

"I am very happy with the results obtained by my sailors. Piotr Cichocki won the World Championship in the 303 singles class, Olga Górnaś-Grudzień took 2nd place in the Women’s section in the 303 singles class and, finally, the team of Piotr Cichocki and Olga Górnaś-Grudzień took second place in 303 Double class," said Grzegorz Protopowicz, Para Sailing coach at the Polish Yachting Association. "We will take three medals to Poland! We also had a great week of training before the competition and now go home happy. We are already waiting for the next challenge."

Vera Voorbach, winner of the Liberty Class, said, "At the last Worlds in 2018 in Hiroshima I was 3rd, so I hoped that I could be in top 3 again, but I won gold and I’m very happy with this result Although we had to be patient this week with the difficult weather circumstances, we did 5 races. For me it was perfect circumstances, about 3 Beaufort and pretty much wind shifts."

"Due to my spinal cord injury, I do not have enough power in my arms to steer and pull the sheets manually. Therefore, I have servo equipment in my boat, so I can adjust my rudder and sheets electronically with a joystick. To handle my boat this way is more difficult than doing everything manually. I can’t feel pressure on my rudder or sheets this way. But I did it! It is the first time that a sailor who handles the boat with servo equipment has won the World Championship!"

Massimo Dighe, Para World Sailing Manager, said, "This was an excellent exhibition of para sailing in single and double competition. We commend the Hansa class for creating a boat for all sailors and promoting inclusion within the class. The growth of para sailing around the world is great for the future of the sport. Congratulations to the winners, and everybody for being able to take part in the Championships – especially those making their debut. We look forward to seeing more sailors competing at tournaments around the world in the coming months."

Prior to the 2021 Hansa World Championships, World Sailing supported sailors from Brazil, Chile, Czech Republic, Estonia, Ireland, Lithuania and the Philippines with travel costs, accommodation and providing boats as part of the Para Sailing Development Program (PDP). The teams also received coaching support as World Sailing aims to increase worldwide participation and expand the competition.

More than 32 nations participate internationally each year at various World Championships. By 2023, World Sailing aims to have 45 nations from six continents participating in all levels of Para sailing and inclusive events.

Published in World Sailing
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For a second year, World Sailing will hold its 2020 Annual General Meeting and General Assembly online only due to the global challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Abu Dhabi in the UAE had been scheduled to host World Sailing’s annual conference in 2020 and then it was postponed to October 2021. Now delegates have been informed this month that these plans too have been scrubbed. 

World Sailing’s board of directors will again hold the AGM and General Assembly electronically, in accordance with a written special resolution approved by its member national authorities.

In addition, all commission, sub-committee, committee and council meetings that would normally take place during the conference will also be hosted electronically.

Cork's Marcus Spillane is serving as a World Sailing Vice President.

Published in World Sailing
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The Northern Hemisphere edition of Steering the Course, World Sailing’s global women’s sailing festival, will run from today [Friday 21 May] to Sunday 30 May.

Countries, classes and sailing clubs across the world will be holding special events throughout the next 10 days, aimed at introducing more women and girls to sailing and providing information on different pathways available in the sport.

Antigua, Barbados, Croatia, Denmark, Great Britain, Hungary, Hong Kong, Iceland, Japan, Malta, Slovakia and the USA are amongst the Member National Authorities which have actively planned and promoted a variety of activities.

From dinghies to keelboats and windsurfing to kiteboarding, all disciplines are welcome to be part of the festival.

Published in Women in Sailing
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After the IOC informed World Sailing that they are continuing their assessment of the Mixed Offshore Event to address challenges raised but formally requested that World Sailing propose alternative event(s).

Following a request from the IOC for such proposals, MNAs, Class Associations, Committee Chairs and the Board were invited to propose alternative event suggestions in the form of submissions.

World Sailing received 26 submissions, and these were considered by the President and the Board with respect to their adherence to Regulation 23.1.11 which includes the IOC criteria framework.

The World Sailing Board and President approved three alternative event proposals in the 30 April 2021 Board Meeting. These are: - Individual Men's and Women's Kiteboard Events - Formula Kite - Individual Men's and Women's Two Person Dinghy Events - 470 - Mixed Team Racing - ILCA 6

The Board discussed and agreed there wasn't strong enough alignment to the IOC criteria for all other submissions and one submission did not comply with the requirements of Regulation 23.1.11.

The Board's considerations regarding all submissions received is available (as a PDF) to download below. Where submissions were identical, these were consolidated to one joint submission in the name of all submitters.

At the 2021 Mid-Year Meeting the Constitution, Events and Equipment Committees will each meet on 10-11 May 2021. They will consider the submissions on alternative event(s) and make their respective recommendations to Council.

World Sailing's Council will meet on 14 May 2021. They will discuss and vote on the three approved submissions. The outcome of the process will be a decision of two alternative event proposals, ranked in order of preference, ahead of the IOC deadline, which is 26 May 2021. -- Daniel Smith, Director of Communications and Digital

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As well as Ireland’s role at the top of World Sailing with Cork's Marcus Spillane elected as Vice President and Baltimore Sailing Club's Fiona Bolger on its council, six Irish sailors have been appointed to World Sailing Committees today and will serve until 2024.

Belfast Lough’s Chris Lindsay from Carrickfergus is the new chair of International Umpires Sub-Committee. The Ulsterman, who has been selected as an International Technical Official (ITO) for the Tokyo Olympics this July, has also been appointed to Race Officials Committee.

The National Yacht Club’s Con Murphy will continue on World Sailing's Race Management Sub-Committee.

Royal Cork’s Michael O’Connor will continue to serve on the Match Racing Sub-Committee. The Cork Harbour race official will also chair World Sailing’s Team Racing Sub - Committee.

The Royal Irish Yacht Club’s Paddy Boyd continues on World Sailing's Oceanic & Offshore Committee.

World Sailing's Council, the ultimate decision-making body of World Sailing, approved the appointments to the Committees and Commissions for 2021 - 2024. The Board of Directors carried out an in-depth review of their CV's bearing in mind a new set of new key principles they devised such as: relevant experience and expertise, good female representation, strong geographical split, focus on emerging nations and new members to introduce fresh thinking.

Download the full list of World Sailing Committee members below

Published in World Sailing
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Ahead of the 2021-2024 Racing Rules of Sailing which come into effect on 1 January, the RYA has released an update to the World Sailing Rules App — giving sailors access to a ‘one-stop shop’ for the 2021-2024 rules and associated documents.

Launched in 2016, the multilingual app was developed by the RYA in partnership with World Sailing and has proven popular with racing sailors and officials worldwide, ensuring they have all the relevant rules information at their fingertips.

Steen Ingerslev, RYA publications manager said: “We are delighted to be working with World Sailing once again. We’ve made huge advances with RYA eBooks and digital resources in recent years ensuring popular app features like the ‘Integrated eBook’ are more accessible than ever before.”

The ‘Integrated eBook’ links all the rules documents together, enabling the user to navigate seamlessly between the rules and cases, highlighting a number of cases for each rule in both overview and full case detail formats.

A rules mode in the settings allows the user to select Windsurfing, Team, Match, Radio or Kiteboard Racing amendments for their convenience. They can also select a country, enabling any translated rules and showing the local prescriptions from any participating National Authority.

The World Sailing Rules App can be downloaded for free through the Apple App Store and Google Play. If you’ve already downloaded the 2017-2020 version, it will be automatically updated. The ‘Integrated eBook’ will be available shortly as an in-app purchase.

Published in World Sailing

There are some well put together arguments related to the future of sailing, and especially World Sailing's need for involvement in offshore sailing articulated by Knut Frostad in this video interview below with SEILmagasinet, where the Norwegian sailor issues a wake-up call to World Sailing. (English starts at 0:30).

Frostad has to be close to the top of the list of people you would like to emerge as a leader when critical decisions about the sport of sailing being debated. A two time Olympian a four-time Volvo Ocean Race sailor, the CEO of three Volvo Ocean Races and currently the CEO of Navico, one of the largest marine Electronic firms, the Norwegian has very clear views about sailing, World Sailing, the Olympic Games and the future of all three.

The debate has become even more topical with the delay of the decision on whether offshore sailing should be in the Olympics in 2024. Frostad is very clear that the proposed mixed doubles offshore event offers an opportunity for World Sailing to regain a foremost position in the sport beyond the Olympic Games. He unfavourably compares World Sailing with other International Federations, noting that other than the racing rules, WS has no influence, control, investment or payback from an area of the sport that is more popular than Olympic sailing. His arguments are backed by media figures for events such as the Vendee Globe and the Jules Verne.

A fascinating interview, articulating well the issues around sailing and the Olympics.

Published in World Sailing
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Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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