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Displaying items by tag: Newbuild

Ferry operator Aran Island Ferries has announced it’s on track to make history this summer – by commissioning Ireland’s largest domestic ferry.

The boat, reports GalwayBayFM, will be a 40 metre vessel with space for 400 passengers, which represents a significant boost in capacity over it’s current largest boats, Music of the Sea and Magic of the Sea.

The new vessel will be the sixth boat in the Aran Island Ferries fleet – though full details or a name for the vessel have yet to be revealed.

Afloat.ie adds as for the names of the larger ferries this is in fact their English translation. The names of these vessels are in Irish, Ceol na Farraige (built 2001) and Draíocht na Farraige (1999) respectively.

Each of the 37m Wavemaster monohull craft can carry 294 passengers. 

Published in Ferry

The fourth and final 'W' series of newbuilds for Arklow Shipping was launched earlier this month, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arklow Wood was successfully launched at the Ferus Smit's shipyard in Leer, Germany.

As Afloat reported a previous sister Arklow Willow was launched last year though the 'Wind' is the first to be used in the owners naming scheme for this series.

The Arklow Wood took to the waters on 3rd April and will fly the Irish flag. As for design the cargoship is an enlarged version of the 8500dwt ships that the shipyard delivered to Arklow Shipping in the past.  The cargoship in comparison with these predecessors has almost twice the carrying capacity of 16,500dwt.

As for propulsion the newbuild is equipped with a 3840kW main engine in order to achieve low fuel consumption.

The design features:
– Main dimensions (Loa X B X T) 149.50 X 19.25 X 8.59 mtr.
– 16500 DWT, 700.000 cft hold volume.
– Iceclass 1A with 3840kW main engine.
– 2 box shaped holds.
– Propeller equipped with a duct for enhanced thrust at lower speeds and reduction of maximum installed propulsion power.

A previous 'W' series of a different design and all since disposed had been the first newbuilds for ASL to be ordered from a shipyard outside Europe, having been built in South Korea. This series however only totalled a trio and all using the same ship names now applied to the new series comprising of leadship Arklow Wave, Wind and Willow.

Another recent newbuild, Arklow Ace launched last month and belonging to the 'A'  series was also built by the same German group but at their Ferus Smit yard at Westerbroek, The Netherlands. The newbuild has recently left the inland yard under the Irish flag. 

The fleet of ASL including its Dutch division totals almost 60 dry-cargo vessels among them deep-sea bulk-carriers. 

Published in Ports & Shipping

The latest and third newbuild of the Arklow 'A' class series which is a bulk orientated general cargoship was launched at a Dutch yard, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arklow Ace (Nb.439) took to the water for the first time as the third of six such ships so far from the Ferus Smit yard at Westerbroek on Friday.

Arklow Ace was christened for owners Arklow Shipping and at the stern the Co. Wicklow town is given as the port of registry. When the newbuild enters service this Irish flagged vessel will expand the fleet to 57 dry-cargo ships including 17 that are Dutch flagged.

Not only is Arklow Ace a new ship but is a first for ASL having this particular 'A' name suffix along with the previously completed sister, Arklow Accord (launched in November). The first of the series, leadship Arklow Abbey (in July) is an exception as the same name was previously used in a vessel dating to 1981 and sold in 1996.

The design of the A series is a slightly modified version of the first series of the 8600dwt bulkers that Ferus Smit built under the name of the Arklow B series.

A modified bow form and hull is adapted for Iceclass 1A conditions. As for propulsion this sees a propeller nozzle added while the main engine output was decreased to 2000 kW for better fuel efficiency.

This ship has the following characteristics:
– Loa = 119.495 mtr
– Lpp = 116.895 mtr
– B = 14.99 mtr
– D = 9.70 mtr
– T max = 7.160 mtr
– Hold volume = 350.000 cft

When Arklow Ace is delivered into service, the newbuild will be primary employed in typical shipments such as wheat, corn and other bulk commodities throughout European waters.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Arklow Accord is the latest of a new series for ship-owner Arklow Shipping Ltd, however the bulk oriented cargo vessel is also a first for the company to use this ship name, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The launching of newbuild Arklow Accord (Nb. 438) which took place on Friday, represents the second of a six ships using the Arklow 'A' naming scheme. The order by ASL is with shipbuilder Ferus Smit at their Dutch shipyard located in Westerbroek. 

Currently the company have almost 60 vessels including Dutch division Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. and this milestone is to be exceeded with the roll-out of the Arklow A - series. 

The design of Arklow Accord will see its operations chiefly employed in the shipment of corn, wheat and other bulk commodities in European waters.

The inland yard at Westerbroek, is where Irish flagged leadship Arklow Abbey was also given the customary launched sideways in July and with the newbuild entering service two months later.

According to Ferus Smit, the design is a slightly modified version of the first series of 8600dwt bulkers that the shipyard built under the Arklow B – series. The new design is adapted for iceclass 1A, with modified bow form and propulsion with a propeller nozzle added.

At the same time, the main engine output was decreased to 2000 kW for better fuel efficiency.

Listed below are the basic characteristics of Arklow Accord:
– Loa = 119.495 mtr
– Lpp = 116.895 mtr
– B = 14.99 mtr
– D = 9.70 mtr
– T max = 7.160 mtr
– Hold volume = 350.000 cft

The delivery of the Arklow registered newbuild is due for January 2020.

Published in Ports & Shipping

To those in Cork City this weekend and travelling down J.J. Horgan's Quay may have noticed a sleek new naval arrival making its way upriver to the quay.

According to CorkBeo, the shiny arrival is a new French Naval ship, Rhône. It was only launched this year, so get down to see this while you can!

The newbuild is a support vessel of the French Navy which entered service this year and as Afloat reported in the summer Rhône made a first visit to Ireland. On that occasion it was to the Port of Waterford.

For more on this current call to Cork, click here, before the naval visitor departs the city on Monday morning.

Published in Naval Visits

Scot Explorer became the latest launch for a UK shipping forests products operator, following a christening ceremony that was held at a Dutch shipyard yesterday, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The launch (footage) of newbuild (NB 747) at the Royal Bodewes yard in Hoogezand marked the second of a three-ship order confirmed from Scotline which has its headquarters based in Romford, Kent.

Unlike leadship Scot Carrier launched last year, the latest newbuild of the trio of 4,800dwt sisters, differs having enclosed bridge wings, in order to make manoeuvring easier. The newbuild is due to be completed next month.

As for the final timber products carrier, this newbuild to be named Scot Ranger is scheduled to be delivered at the end of 2020.

Scotline primarily runs liner services throughout northern Europe with regular routes between Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Germany, Norway and the Baltic States. In addition to those serving the UK, Netherlands and France.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Irish Lights counterpart serving the waters of England, Wales and the Channel Islands, Trinity House has launched a Vessel Replacement Project to commission the design and build of a vessel to replace THV Patricia. The vessel was delivered in 1982 and is reaching the end of its operational life.

The announcement was made at a launch event at Trinity House in London yesterday, during London International Shipping Week (LISW19). Attending the event was Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani and where a contract notice was issued to the shipbuilding industry to open the procurement process.

The Minister announced her support for the project in July 2019, following a comprehensive Fleet Review that concluded that the three General Lighthouse Authorities of the UK and Ireland (Trinity House, Northern Lighthouse Board and Irish Lights) require seven vessels to deliver their critical aids to navigation service.

The new vessel will look to harness technological and environmental innovation to ensure that Trinity House continues to provide over 600 critical aids to navigation—such as lighthouses and buoys—for ships and seafarers in some of the most dangerous waters in the world, guiding them into safe channels away from hazards and wrecks.

Nusrat Ghani, Maritime Minister, said: “95% of our imports and exports are transported to and from the UK by sea and, with our waters becoming even busier, dealing with incidents quickly and efficiently is more important than ever. This new ship will support the General Lighthouse Authority to help future-proof their fleet and continue to support maritime trade for generations to come.”

Captain Ian McNaught, Executive Chairman of Trinity House, said: “We were pleased to hear that the Maritime Minister was content for us to move the Vessel Replacement Project closer towards the design and build phase. While we must ensure that value for money is central to the design, we will also be looking for new, tested and robust technologies in the vessel design; these technologies will need to offer high performance and resilience and also reduce our environmental impact.”

Published in Lighthouses

A French Navy offshore support and assistance vessel which was commissioned into service earlier this year visited Waterford City over the weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The impressive Loire class or Metropolitan Support and Assistance Building (BSAM) Rhône entered service in January. This call to the 'Crystal City' was a maiden first to Ireland as the 70m newbuild berthed on the Suir at the Frank Cassin Wharf.

This part of the port on the Co. Kilkenny side was where Bell Lines lo-lo terminal was located before shifting downriver to Belview, the current main terminal of the Port of Waterford.

BSAM Rhône entered service in January as the second of pair following leadship BSAM Loire that form part of the unarmed support ships serving the French Navy. The newbuild built in Brittany at the Piriou shipyards of Concarneau was developed in a programme named the Kership. The joint venture was created in 2013 by Piriou (55%) and DCNS (45%).

The newbuild which has a displacement of 2960 tons has a propulsion system derived from two diesel engines that delivers a speed of 14 knots. A crew consists of 17 sailors in addition to an option for 12 divers.

This morning the naval visitor is scheduled to depart the Suir. 

Published in Naval Visits

Following the Rockall fishery dispute that grabbed the headlines last week, the UK's newest Fishery Patrol Vessel (FPV) completed a delivery voyage from Scotland to its homeport of Portsmouth today, writes Jehan Ashmore.

HMS Medway arrived on Solent waters this morning. The newbuild is the second of five new British Royal Navy Batch 2 River-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV) currently under construction on the Clyde at BAE Systems Scotstoun yard.

The final Batch 2 river class OPV HMS Spey was on Friday taken out of the shipyard's Block Outfit Hall and positioned onto the hard stand ready to be loaded onto the launch barge.

BAE's shipyard is located upriver of the striking multi-award winning Riverside Museum in Glasgow where Afloat visited the iconic building designed by the Iranian born architect, the late Zaha Hadid.

As for the design of the HMS Medway and its future function, according to the Royal Navy they they will not use the Batch 2 class primarily for safeguarding fishing stocks in home waters but ‘forward deploy’ around the world. In addition to fishery duties, the class are designed to carry out counter-terrorism and anti-smuggling requirements in order to safeguard the UK's borders.

The new class each of 2000 tonnes will according to Naval Technology are to replace the Royal Navy’s current River-class patrol ships, including HMS Clyde, Severn, Tyne and Mersey. See report of Dublin Port call of the Liverpool based OPV and related role in the UK Government's Brexit contingency fund plan.

Leadship of the class is HMS Forth which like the rest of the class could find themselves on patrol in the Atlantic, the Caribbean, Mediterranean or the Pacific rim operating from Singapore.

In December HMS Medway took its first sea trials along the Firth of Clyde and from where Afloat last Friday had traced the OPV back to the Faslane Naval Base on Gare Loch having departed the previous day. Faslane is the homeport of the Royal Navy's Trident class nuclear powered submarines.

The course set by HMS Medway also revealed further sea trails exercises that took place in the southern waters of the Firth of Cyde. This involved an area between Ardrossan in Ayrshire and Ailsa Craig, an impressive rocky islet.

On the following day (Friday) HMS Medway was tracked by Afloat when its reached the centre of the St. Georges Channel. It is in these waters where the temporary Rosslare-Fishguard ferry Stena Nordica (deputing for Stena Europe) had already proceeded beyond mid-channel during a routine morning sailing to the Pembrokeshire port in south-west Wales.

According to AIS system, HMS Medway achieved a speed of 24.9 knots while in relatively close quarters of an Irish flagged dry-cargoship the Arklow Cliff. At just three metres shorter in length compared to the 90m naval newbuild, the 2,999grt cargoship had too set a southerly course.

Arklow Cliff Afloat featured its launch just two years ago and on this occasion as an operational ship was tracked underway while making a more sedate speed of 11.9 knots. By coincidence Arklow Cliff was bound for the River Medway where the town and Port of Rochester is located about 30 miles east of London.

Arklow Cliff likewise of HMS Medway had departed its last port last Thursday, but from Warrenpoint in Co. Down. The short-sea trader arrived in the north Kent port yesterday having sailed along the Thames Estuary from where on the southern shore the cargoship entered the Medway to approach Rochester.

Published in News Update

#Ports&Shipping- Specialist forest carrier operator, ScotLine which operates regular services to Irish ports, last week saw their latest newbuild take to the seas for first trails, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Since Scot Carrier's christening launch ceremony in September, the 4,800dwt short-sea timber trader, now the largest of the fleet has undergone outfitting. Last week the 90m long cargoship which has a beam of 15m departed on a canal journey under towage from the Dutch inland shipyard of Royal Bodewes in Hoogezand to Delfzijl.

From there Scot Carrier sailed under its own propulsion (Mak engine) to Eemshaven having made the passage through the Ems Estuary to enter the open sea. According to Royal Bodewes the inaugural sea trial in the North Sea was successfully executed.

Furthermore, Afloat today tracked Scot Carrier undergoing trials again having departed Emshaven, from where the newbuild is at time of writing offshore of Esbjerg, Denmark. 

Scot Carrier has been given an ice class 1B classification which is important for Baltic customers of the operator, which primarily runs 'liner' services around Northern Europe with regular routes between Ireland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Germany. In addition to liner links calling to ports in the UK, France and The Netherlands.

The newbuild will join fleetmates that in addition to transporting forest products also can vary in loading a variety of bulk and project cargoes.

Published in Ports & Shipping
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Fastnet Yacht Race 

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge. For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between. The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish is in Plymouth, Devon via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Plymouth.
  • The lighthouse first shone its light on New Year’s Day in 1854
    Fastnet Rock originally had six keepers (now unmanned), with four on the rock at a time with the other two on leave. Each man did four weeks on, two weeks off

At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

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