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Displaying items by tag: 505

Finally, after all the frustration in Cork Harbour, the Royal Cork Yacht Club hosted 505 Worlds finish in brochure conditions...

The final day again dawned with no wind and again, the wind filled in from the NE out to sea. Today the conditions were even better than yesterday with the wind filling in slightly stronger and holding for longer. Nearly all racing was conducted in 10-12 maybe 14kn of wind. Late in the day, it did move slightly right and start to fade, but by then, boats were turning onto their last upwind of the final race.

Three races again were conducted today, allowing 7 races in total and bringing a drop into play.

The first race of the day (R5) looked like there could be some movement ahead for the leader board. McNay and Payne were 7th and Batchelor/Pascoe 3rd. The winners were Jan-Philipp Hofmann and Felix Brockerhoff in a tight battle with Roger Gilbert and Ben McGrane. Peter Nicholas and Luke Payne were part that trio, but on the last run they went furthest to the left when a little righty came down the centre of the course dropping them to 6th. The German pair of Hofmann and Brockerhoff looked like they could move up to third overall.

The second race of the day (R6) was a return to form for McNay/Payne, but Batchelor/Pascoe were a little deep. Nicholas/Payne were again near the front and this time would make no mistake finishing second. Former champions Mike Holt and Adam Lowry emerged from the forest they had been lost in all regatta to give us a flash of brilliance to pick up third.

And the final race (R7), well it was an exhibition, really. McNay and Paine just sailed away from the fleet. It was impressive! In second, was the other form boat Batchelor and Pascoe with third going to Mike Martin and Adam Lowry.

In a post-race interview, McNay and Paine shared their glory with their coach, (and McNay's crew for the last two Olympics), Dave Hughes.

The two lead boats were identical packages. Brand new Ovington V2 hulls, Pinnell and Bax sails and Superspar M2 masts.

The top Irish were locals Ewan Barry and Charles Dwyer in 12th place.

Next year the Worlds return to the US West Coast in Santa Cruz and given the size of the US fleet here in Cork, it should be a great success.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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After a long wait, the 505 World Championship fleet in Cork Harbour was greeted with a 12-14kn from the N/E today.

It was a gradient breeze and expected to wane a little as the day went on. The PRO could get a maximum of three races in, and three were needed to constitute a series, so everyone knew what was to come. Whilst the breeze was oscillating, most of the fleet worked to the left upwind, and down. There seemed to be more pressure over there.

There were some performances to highlight throughout the races.

South Africans James Largier and Richard Hutton-Squire in 6th the first race of the day (R2). Lena Stückl and Johannes Tellen 7th in R2 - Lena stated yesterday she prefers breeze and proved it. In R3 Malin Broberg and Johan Röök finishing 4th and locals Ewen Barry and Charles Dwyer in R4 finished 6th, plus youngster Morgan Pickney and Garrett Brown 4th in R4.

Tomorrow the wind looks lighter but hopes remain for a few more races to finish the WorldsTomorrow the wind looks lighter but hopes remain for a few more races to finish the Worlds Photo: Christian Favreau

The first race today, (R2) was almost perfect 505 weather, the lightweight teams were in play and the heavyweight teams were in play. Crews were on the wire and the boats could power reach the runs. At the top mark the first time the team of McNay and Paine were again in the front with Mike Martin and Adam Lowry looming. The other front runners of Batchelor and Pascoe were back in the teens. For the second leg Batchelor and Pascoe moved through the fleet finishing third behind our two original race leaders.

The second race, (R3) was a couple of knots lighter moving to the 9-11kn range and favouring our lighter teams. This time Batchelor and Pascoe lead from start to finish with McNay and Paine second. The fleet was tight, so there was a large bunch fighting for third. Nicholas and Payne won that battle from the Swedish team of Broberg and Röök, the leading mixed team.

In the final race the pressure again dropped a couple more knots and moved right 20 degrees. The order for the lead was reversed with McNay and Paine leading Batchelor and Pascoe, third went to Mal Higgins and Nick (Camel) Johnstone. The big excitement for the whole fleet though was the finish of Earle Alexander and Angus Higgins in 8th. Angus is Malcolm's son and an emerging youth sailor. He joined with Earle (76y.o.), a class stalwart and permanent fixture in the 505 class for at least 40 years, and one of the most popular men in the field. Earle is there for everyone, yet he has never had a top 10 race at a Worlds, until today - there was a lot of celebration.

Tomorrow the wind looks lighter but hopes remain for a few more races to finish the Worlds. No drops as yet, so McNay and Paine have a 5-point lead heading into the final day.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Day three is completed and the 505 World Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club still have only sailed one race.

Ireland has a large ridge of no wind sitting stationary above it, and it is wreaking havoc on the 505 fleet.

For the second day in a row, the planned racecourse offshore had zero wind.

The race committee tried to get racing on the inshore course.

There has been localised breeze inshore over the last few days and on the planned inshore course, it varied from 3-8 knots, with large direction changes.

Sailors left shore at midday and the first attempt at racing was around 2.45 pm.

The 505 class requires more than 5 knots over the course otherwise, racing is abandoned. Two races were started in 7-8 knots but both were abandoned halfway through when it dropped to 3 knots.

The fleet was kept on the water until 6 pm, but nothing eventuated, and everyone went home frustrated.

The pressure is on to get some races in. Tomorrow (Thursday) is a scheduled lay day which may be converted to a racing day, but again, no wind is expected. 

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Light winds continue to affect the 505 World Championship programme at Royal Cork Yacht Club in Cork Harbour.

Racing was cancelled on the second day of the competition at Crosshaven due to lack of wind.

Only one of two races were held on Monday's opening day also due to light winds.

Racing continues on Wednesday.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Americans Stuart Mcnay and Caleb Paine have won the first race of the 505 World Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club in Cork Harbour.

Best of the Irish in the 77-boat fleet was recently crowned national champion, Monkstown Bay's Chris Bateman sailing with Paul O'Sullivan in 14th place.

The first day of racing continued the challenging conditions seen at last week's Pre-Worlds.

Racing was postponed with sailors held ashore in anticipation of an afternoon sea breeze. Competitors launched around midday with the hope of two races with a 2 pm start. There were early signs of good breeze on the sail out, but once competitors exited the harbour the wind faded away. Eventually, a light sea breeze crept over the horizon and a two-lap course was set. The wind fluctuated between 4-6 knots throughout the race but was reasonably steady in direction.

Soon after the gun, the pathfinder (lead boat who sails from a pin on port and all the other boats sail behind her in a gate start) started to lift. The phases looked long and slow, plus there was the potential of slightly more wind to the right, so a lot of the fleet headed that way. Stuart McNay and Caleb Paine USA 9245 jumped from the gate early tacked onto port crossing the fleet and then brought the fleet pack from the right, at the top mark they lead and right behind them were Nathan Batchelor and Sam Pascoe GBR 9240. The top boats from the Pre-Worlds continued their form in the light winds. Right there also were youngsters Morgan Pickney and Garrett Brown and European Champions Roger Gilbert and Ben McGrane.

Position held on the run, but at the gate, an incident saw Batchelor and Pascoe doing a turn.

For the next leg,  the top mark was moved and the course shortened to ensure a finish in the light breeze. So Batchelor and Pascoe dropped to fourth, Gilbert and McGrane climbed to second with Pickney and Brown finishing third.

From there, with no prospect of any more wind, the fleet were sent home. Racing resumes tomorrow. The wind again looks light, but with the expectation of some in the morning, the fleet will be on the water early.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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There are less than two weeks until sailors gather for the 65th International 505 World Championships at the Royal Cork Yacht Club from 3-13 August.

Held every year since 1956, this is the first Worlds for the dinghy class since Fremantle in Australia in 2019, and 505 sailors will be more than keen to compete again.

This year’s event will be the fourth time the 505 Worlds have been hosted in Crosshaven since 1959 and the first in 40 years. Competitors can expect any range of conditions, with racing held offshore in the Atlantic to ensure fair courses.

Given the expected cool temperatures, competitors should anticipate gradient breezes, so shifty conditions and lots of pressure changes. Onshore they can expect the full gamut of Irish hospitality, including daily prize-giving and social events in a picturesque and beautiful location.

The International 505 is an iconic class, and a boat that generates fierce loyalty from all those that sail one. Famously, Paul Evstrom said: “The 5O5 is really my favourite class because it is so lively and responsive in all types of wind and sea conditions….after having sailed all types of dinghy and all types of keelboat I would like to tell you that no other boat is able to give one so much pleasure as this one.”

Designed by Britain’s John Westall in 1954, the 505 is a perfect combination of tactical, technical and speed sailing. There are faster boats than a 505, but none feel as fast and it can be sailed fast in all conditions.

Mastery takes many years as there is no end of controls you can adjust, allowing 505 sailors to develop very deep technical sailing knowledge. Also, little ground is lost when tacking or gybing a 505, meaning every tactical opportunity can be pursued.

The joy of sailing 505s attracts all types of sailors — Olympians, pros and club sailors alike. Despite reduced numbers because of the Covid effect, the fleet is packed with talent. Some highlights include:

  • From Australia, Luke Payne will be coming straight from his duties on the Danish SailGP team to sail with Peter Nicholas. Together they have had a 4th and 2nd before; is this their year?
  • Olympic bronze medallist Ian Brown sailing with Tom Olsen (US), two-time Star world champion and one-time Etchells world champ.
  • From the US, four-time Olympian Stuart McNay sailing with Caleb Paine, bronze medallist in the 2020 Olympics in the Finn class.
  • Mike Martin and Adam Lowry, defending champions and 2019 US sailors of the year. Plus, Mike is the only person to win the 505 World Championship as both a sailor and crew.
  • From Germany, three-time Olympian, seven-time world champion (five in 505s) and the King of Kiel Week with a whopping 23 wins, Wolfgang Hunger will pair up with his original 505 crew and three-time world champ Holger Jess.
  • Perennial threats Stefan Boehm and Gerald Roos are racing, as is Johannes Tellen this time pairing with champion sailor Lena Stuckl.
  • From the UK, 2006 world champion Mark Upton-Brown teams up with Ian Mitchell, while 2008 champ Ian Pinnell is sailing with 2015 and 2017 champion Carl Smit from the US. Carl normally sails with three-time world champion Mike Holt, an Englishman who lives and races for the US. Holty is sailing with Rob Woelfel, with whom he won his first world title in 2014 and these two are the form boat coming into this event.

Ten races are scheduled for the Worlds from 8-13 August, with six for the pre-Worlds on 5-6 August. There is a maximum of three races each day.

Starting races in the 505 class is unique in that they utilise a gate start. A pathfinder boat will sail close hauled from the pin on port and the fleet must pass behind her on starboard. The advantage is that it is very rare for a race to have to be restarted, or for competitors to infringe the line. It does, however, put a premium on boat speed and the ability to hold a lane if you want a competitive start.

The other interesting element in 505 racing is that they sail with symmetrical spinnakers but race like they are asymmetrical. The moment crews are on trapeze, it is faster to sail downwind by high-speed reaching and sailing the longer distance. This leads to some very tactical and fast racing.

For more see www.int505.org/2022-world-championship-cork

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Chris Bateman and John Coakley won the 505 dinghy Irish Nationals raced at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club over six races in Cork Harbour.

Six 505s competed. They won four of the six races, for a total of 7 points.

Second were John Downey and Sandy Rimmington, who finished on 12 points and third Richie Harrington and Sandy O’Brien who finished with 16 points.

The two races not won by the overall winners of the Nationals were won by Alex Barry and David Kenefick.

“It was a great weekend of racing,” said Club Commodore Sandy Rimmington. “The countdown is well and truly on now for the Worlds at the start of August.”

They will be held out of the RCYC at Crosshaven.

Royal Cork Yacht Club's Alex Barry took third overall at the 505 British National Championships at Brixham Yacht Club on the south coast of England at the weekend.

After ten races sailed with two discards, Barry, sailing with Harry Briddon of Ogston Sailing Club, finished on an equal 30 points with Roger Gilbert and Ben McGrane of Frensham Pond but the RCYC ace took the podium place after the tie-break rule had been applied. 

Mike Holt and Rob Woelfel of Santa Cruz YC won overall on 12 points with Nathan Batchelor and Sam Pascoe from Tynemouth SC runners-up. 

The top performance couldn't be better timed as Barry prepares to contest the World 505 Championships on home waters this August. 

The placing represents a consistent showing for the Cork Harbour sailor, who has now finished on the podium in three British Championships. He finished second in 2013 and third in 2014.

And in further good news for Munster 505 interests, National 18 class captain Charles Dwyer crewing for the UK's Ian Pinnell, finished fifth overall at Brixham. 

Full results here

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Royal Cork's Alex Barry is going quick in his new 505 campaign towards the World Championships in Cork Harbour next year.

The Irish dinghy ace is teamed up with Harry Briddon of the UK for a title at the 2022 title and is putting in some time this year training at Hayling Island, where last weekend's 505 Euro Cup competition included 49er Gold Medalist from Tokyo, Stuart Bithell. 

After five races sailed in the 15-boat fleet, Barry ended up fourth overall, just two points behind Ian Pinnell and Tom Pickles of the host club in third position. Results are below.

The early boat speed looks promising for the Irish-English duo. Barry told Afloat he was 'flying' upwind, but he and Briddon still have some work on downwind technique.

The class looks forward to holding its 2022 World Championships in Cork from August 3 – 13th, 2022, where Barry is also an event organiser.

One hundred twenty crews from over 15 nations are expected for the 2022 championships. Eight or ten Irish boats will be among this number.

As Afloat previously reported, this will be the fourth time RCYC will have hosted the 505 World Championships, having welcomed visiting crews in 1959, 1964 and 1982. 

Published in Royal Cork YC

With the news that this October's 5o5 World Championships have been cancelled in Bermuda, extra focus is now on Royal Cork's staging of the event in 2022 when the Five-Os come to Cork Harbour

Michael Quirk, President of the International 5o5 Class Association, announces that the 2021 World Championships scheduled to be held in Bermuda at the end of October, has been cancelled.

Concern over travel issues that competitors may have due to Covid 19 quarantines and the impact of the pandemic on shipping costs led to the decision.

While Bermuda is faring well with only a small number of active cases, no hospitalizations and approximately 75% of the adult population vaccinated, competitors from the Antipodes cannot readily travel and return to their homes. Restrictions and quarantine problems between European countries and concern over potential quarantine requirements from contact tracing led to the view that cancellation was prudent.

The Class looks forward to holding its 2022 World Championships in Cork from August 3 – 13th 2022.

120 crews from over 15 nations are expected for the 2022 championships.

As Afloat previously reported, this will be the fourth time RCYC will have hosted the 505 World Championships, having welcomed visiting crews previously in 1959, 1964 and 1982

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Scottish Series Background

Although the format of the Scottish Series varies little from year to year, it is interesting to see some of the changes which the event has seen over the years:

  • CYCA handicap class added to IOR (1976)
  • IOR level rating classes to reflect the popular sizes and World Championships being held in the UK
  • Separate one design class for Sonatas (1980 to date)
  • Campbeltown dropped with offshore races direct to Tarbert (1982)
  • Unique light displacement CYCA class - the forerunner of today's sportboats (1982)
  • Computer results system introduced in 1982 and now recognised as the best in the UK
  • Separate one design class for Sigma 33 (1987 to date)
  • Separate one design classes in certain years for Impalas, Sigma 38, Melges 24 and Cork 1720
  • Inner triangle to shorten courses for smaller classes (1986)
  • Points loading for offshore race reduced from 2 to 1.5 to 1
  • First racing in Scotland under Channel Handicap (1988)
  • Second racecourse for smaller classes (1989)
  • Discard introduced
  • Windward leeward races - two per day (1993)
  • Sportboat classes with no overnight races (1994)
  • Marquee on quayside for main social events (1995-2008)
  • Restricted Sail Class (1998)
  • Third racecourse for sportboats with up to three races per day (1998)
  • Day feeder races (2002)
  • Overnight and day feeder races discontinued (2005)
  • Stand-alone Tarbert Inbound and Outbound passage races introduced (2005/6)

With all these changes, some things have stayed the same:

  • Huge support from Ireland every year since 1975
  • A magnificent effort ashore and afloat from the volunteer helpers of the Clyde Cruising Club, Royal Scottish Motor Yacht Club and Tarbert Loch Fyne Yacht Club
  • Results and communications service at the forefront of technology
  • The best competition and the best social scene in the country
  • An overall Series winner, the roll call including many of the top sailors in Scotland and beyond.

Scottish Series 2022

Following the cancellation of the 2020 event, the dates for the 2021 edition of Scotland's biggest sailing event at Tarbert is: 3 –5 June 2022

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