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Displaying items by tag: Lifeboat

Dublin’s Tom Clarke bridge was lifted for an RNLI lifeboat on Monday morning – but it wasn’t in response to a tasking.

The Dun Laoghaire Harbour lifeboat steamed up the Liffey and berthed on North Wall Quay to mark the publication of two special edition stamps issued by An Post.

The stamps designed by Dave Mooney were “launched” at An Post’s new headquarters, the Exo building on the Docklands as part of a number of events held in Dublin and London to mark two centuries of the RNLI.

Attending the Dublin event was RNLI Head of Region, Ireland, Anna Classon, and An Post chief executive officer David McRedmond, while a number of Irish representatives travelled to a special service of thanksgiving in Westminster Abbey.

Lough Derg helm and writer Eleanor Hooker was invited to read her poem “Float to Live” at the Westminster Abbey service. Also present were colleagues from the Lough Ree station, including lifeboat operations manager Kevin Ganly, treasurer Vincent Rafter and station visits officer Paul Kelly.

RNLI Lough Derg helm Eleanor Hooker reading her poem, “Float to Live” at Westminster Abbey during a special service of thanksgiving to mark the RNLI bicentenaryRNLI Lough Derg helm Eleanor Hooker reading her poem, “Float to Live” at Westminster Abbey during a special service of thanksgiving to mark the RNLI bicentenary

Meanwhile, Lough Ree’s volunteer helm Liam Sheringham was in Dublin. The stamps issued by An Post depict an Atlantic 85 lifeboat, similar to the “Tara Scougall” based at his station.

At Westminster (L-R) Vincent Rafter, Mark Dowie, CEO RNLI, Kevin Ganly, Paul KellyAt Westminster (L-R) Vincent Rafter, Mark Dowie, CEO RNLI, Kevin Ganly, Paul Kelly

The first RNLI lifeboat station was established in Arklow, Co. Wicklow in 1826, and there are 46 stations on the island of Ireland. Lough Ree RNLI is one of four which are on inland waters.

To mark the bicentenary Irish Rail facilitated the lighting up of the White Bridge in Athlone in yellow over the weekend.

Further events are planned in the course of the year, according to the RNLI, including a special “One Moment, One Crew’” occasion on August 1st and the arrival of a commemorative scroll which will visit selected lifeboat stations.

Athlone Town Bridge lit up to commemorate the bicentenary of the RNLI. The first RNLI lifeboat station was established in Arklow, Co. Wicklow in 1826Athlone Town Bridge lit up to commemorate the bicentenary of the RNLI. The first RNLI lifeboat station was established in Arklow, Co. Wicklow in 1826

An Post’s new stamps are the latest in a series on maritime themes. In April 2021, it issued a set of four stamps celebrating eight Irish participants in Antarctic expeditions of the 1800s and early 1900s, including Kerryman Tom Crean.

A set of stamps to commemorate the Commissioners of Irish Lights was issued by An Post in October 2016.

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A group of 26 people were rescued by Lough Ree RNLI on Monday, 31 July, after three boats ran aground north of the Black Islands.

The emergency call was made to the Irish Coast Guard, who requested the aid of the volunteer crew to launch their inshore lifeboat.

The Athlone Sub Aqua Club was also on hand to assist. The Tara Scougall lifeboat was launched from its base at Coosan Point and arrived on the scene within 10 minutes of the call.

The lifeboat found two 52ft cruisers and one 37ft cruiser hard aground on a shoal.

All 26 people on board were found to be safe and well, and the lifeboat crew set about re-floating the three vessels.

A crew member inspected each of the casualty vessels for damage or water ingress before they were successfully re-floated and continued their journey.

Pat Coffey, Lough Ree RNLI Deputy Launching Authority, said: ‘We were delighted to help this evening, and we were glad to find all onboard the vessels were safe and well.

We would like to commend our colleagues from the Athlone Sub Aqua Club, who also responded to this call.' Additionally, Coffey reminded the public to prioritize safety when enjoying water activities, emphasizing the importance of carrying a means of communication, wearing a lifejacket or floatation device, and ensuring boats are well-maintained and have sufficient fuel.

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Kilmore Quay RNLI last night came to the aid of an injured fisherman on board a fishing vessel 33 nautical miles south of Kilmore Quay.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their all-weather Tamar class lifeboat Killarney by the Irish Coast Guard at 10.23 pm to evacuate an injured person from a fishing vessel. The man was working on a 24-metre fishing trawler located 33 nautical miles south of Kilmore Quay when he suffered a serious injury to his hand.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eugene Kehoe and with six crew members onboard, immediately launched and made its way to the scene, arriving at 11.45 pm. Once on scene, the casualty was assessed and then taken onboard the lifeboat where he was attended to by RNLI first aiders on the return journey to Kilmore Quay. The lifeboat arrived back in the harbour at 1.17 am where an ambulance was waiting to take the casualty to hospital.

Speaking following the call out, Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Coxswain, Eugen Kehoe said: ‘This was a good outcome, and thankfully, conditions were calm and favourable. We want to wish the injured man all the best and a speedy recovery. I would also like to commend our volunteer crew who, despite the late call and darkness of night, did not hesitate to respond.’

The Kilmore Quay RNLI lifeboat crew involved in the call-out were Coxswain Eugene Kehoe, Philip Walsh, Aidan Bates, Nigel Kehoe, Trevor Devereux, Sean Furlong, Robbie Connolly and Deputy Launching Authority Eddie Byrne.

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This summer marks 175 years since a lifeboat service was first established in Kilmore Quay. The occasion will be celebrated with an exhibition curated by local author and historian, John Power, over the weekend August 26-28 in the Stella Maris Centre, Kilmore Quay.

In 1846 the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI ) was asked by Inspector General Dombraine to provide a lifeboat for Kilmore Quay. The Institution sent a lifeboat on 28 July 1847. It was put under the care of the Coastguards stationed in Kilmore Quay at the time and so began 175 years of voluntary service to save lives at sea.

John Power is an authority on local maritime history and has published three volumes on the subject as well as the book Above and Beyond the Call of Duty, a tribute to local rescue services published in 1993. This will be John’s 12th exhibition.

Speaking about the upcoming exhibition, John Power said: ‘A lot of material has been collected for this Exhibition through photographs, artefacts, and models of some of the lifeboats that served at the station, including many of the rescues carried out over that period. Hon secretaries, coxswains, engineers and lifeboat crews, volunteers and fundraisers will be features and many more surprises'.

Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, John Grace added: ‘The RNLI lifeboat service is an integral part of Kilmore Quay, and we are thrilled with the exhibition that John has put together and incredibly grateful to him for all his effort. We hope everyone can come down and enjoy the story of how it all started through to today’s modern service and see the tremendous commitment of our volunteer crews through the years.’

The exhibition will open at 6:00 pm on Friday 26 August with the official launch taking place at 7:00 pm. The exhibition will be open on Saturday 27 August from 11 am to 5:30 pm and on Sunday 28 August from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. Admission is free.

Venue: Stella Maris Centre, Kilmore Quay
Admission: Free
Opening Times:
Friday 26 August 6 pm (Official Launch 7pm)
Saturday 27 August 11 am to 5:30 pm
Sunday 28 August 11 am to 6 pm

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Coxswains from Dunmore East, Rosslare Harbour, Kilmore Quay and Castletownbere RNLI have been presented with gallantry awards by His Royal Highness (HRH) The Duke of Kent, in recognition of their lifesaving roles in rescues off the coast of Wexford and West Cork.

The Duke – the RNLI’s President – attended a lunch for a number of volunteers and employees and their partners at St James’s Palace in London on Friday (27 May), during which four Irish Coxswains were presented with the RNLI Bronze Medal for Gallantry.

Mark Dowie, RNLI Chief Executive said: ‘First awarded in 1824, RNLI Medals for Gallantry are the highest honours bestowed by the charity. They are awarded for saving life at sea and celebrate the courage, skill and dedication shown by our charity’s lifesavers.

‘To receive their awards at St James’s Palace from The Duke of Kent is an honour and as the charity’s chief executive, I am humbled and proud of all our volunteers and employees that make up this incredible institution. Every one of them and their families give so much to the charity and our purpose of saving lives at sea.’

Castletownbere RNLI Coxswain Dean Hegarty was presented with a Bronze Medal for Gallantry for his part in the dramatic rescue of a fishing crew in October 2018. In challenging conditions, the Castletownbere crew saved the lives of six fishermen. A local presentation on a future date will see the crew involved receive RNLI framed Letters of Thanks.

The rescue of the six men who were the crew of the 25m fishing vessel, Clodagh O, took place on the evening of 10 October 2018 at an area known as The Pipers immediately south west of the harbour entrance at Castletownbere. Answering an urgent Mayday from the fishing crew, the lifeboat launched in darkness into a Force 9 gale, driving rain and heavy squalls, to rescue the crew who were in grave and imminent danger due to their vessel having lost all power after their propeller became fouled on their fishing gear.

The Duke of Kent with Dean Hegarty of Castletownbere RNLI Photo: Beaumont PhotographyThe Duke of Kent with Dean Hegarty of Castletownbere RNLI Photo: Beaumont Photography

Arriving on scene, the lifeboat crew saw that the fishing vessel was located in a precarious position and Coxswain Hegarty made the decision not to take the crew off the boat but instead establish a towline in breaking 4-5m swells.

With the weather deteriorating, there was only a short window of opportunity to save the men before the vessel would hit the rocks or cliff face and be lost. With the Coxswain skilfully manoeuvring the lifeboat into position and holding it steady in mountainous seas, the lifeboat crew on deck established a tow on first attempt. The Coxswain had to initially steer the lifeboat out to sea to gain a safe separation between the rocks and cliffs before he could then turn the lifeboat and start the journey back to the harbour. The tow was carried out at a speed of a half a knot in case it parted, only gathering speed as they found shelter. Once inside the safety of the harbour two local tugboats helped to secure the boat alongside the pier.

RNLI Coxswains Eamonn O’Rourke from Rosslare Harbour, Eugene Kehoe from Kilmore Quay and Roy Abrahamsson from Dunmore East were also presented with Bronze Medals for Gallantry on Friday for their role in a rescue in 2020 that saved nine lives and prevented a 100m cargo vessel, carrying 4,000 tonnes of coal, from hitting rocks at Hook Head. The volunteer lifeboat crews who responded to the call out will each receive Medal Certificates.

On 20 October 2020, Dunmore East RNLI, Kilmore Quay RNLI and Rosslare Harbour RNLI, along with Rescue 117, conducted a joint rescue operation off the Wexford coast. The Lily B had lost all power, just two nautical miles from Hook Head. Conditions on scene were force eight with severe force nine gusts and wave heights between eight and ten metres. The Lily B was drifting and in danger of striking rocks on Hook Head or capsizing in the heavy seas.

The 12-hour service in challenging conditions saw multiple attempts by the lifeboat crews involved to establish a tow between the casualty vessel and the lifeboats. With the crew of the Lily B unable to stay on deck for long in the poor conditions and with language difficulties, two of the lifeboats were eventually successful in passing a rope on deck by using a rocket line and pulling the cargo vessel clear of the rocks. The lifeboat tow was maintained for three hours with waves continually crashing over the decks until the tug vessel Tramontine from Waterford Port arrived on scene and took up the tow. The three lifeboats stayed with the Lily B until they reached the safety of the Waterford Estuary.

During the ceremony, Coxswain Eamonn O’Rourke was also accorded a vellum for his role during a Storm Ophelia rescue in 2017 in hurricane conditions described by the crew as some of the worst they had ever witnessed. The crew battled 10m seas in force 12 conditions to save three lives. The Rosslare lifeboat crew involved will each receive Vellum Service Certificates.

At 10am on 16 October 2017, a Mayday was received by the Irish Coast Guard from the skipper of Second Love, a 10m Dehler yacht, in serious trouble en route from the UK to Malahide. With conditions deteriorating rapidly the crew were struggling to keep control of the yacht. They had planned to berth in Rosslare but decided to head to Arklow in a bid to outrun the weather. Rosslare Harbour RNLI lifeboat was launched, and the rescue lasted four hours in severe weather and sea conditions. In what proved a vital course of action on the day, a decision was made to pass a drogue (a device trailed behind a vessel to slow it down in rough conditions) to the casualty yacht and then establish a tow to bring the vessel to safety.

Commending those who received awards on Friday and those who will receive awards locally, Anna Classon, RNLI Head of Region for Ireland, said: ‘The RNLI does not give out awards for gallantry lightly and to receive one is a great privilege. Everyone in the region is extremely proud of our lifeboat crews involved in these three rescues for their brave actions that together saved the lives of 18 people.’

HRH The Duke of Kent has been President of the RNLI since 1969 after succeeding both his parents as President of the charity.

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A lifeboat mechanic from Portrush RNLI was invited to join His Royal Highness (HRH) The Duke of Kent at St James’s Palace last week (Friday 27 May) to be presented with a Vellum from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) for his part in a daring rescue that saved the life of a teenage boy off Portstewart Head in September 2020. Portrush RNLI station mechanic Dave Robinson attended the event with his wife Livvy, where he was awarded a Vellum for his actions that day.

The Duke – the RNLI’s President – attended a lunch for the 16 volunteers and employees and their partners, including lifeboat crew from Castletownbere, Rosslare Harbour, Kilmore Quay, Dunmore East, Portrush, Trearddur Bay, Salcombe, and Hayling Island, along with RNLI lifeguards from Mawgan Porth in Cornwall.

A total of 12 RNLI Medals for Gallantry were presented to crew and lifeguards by The Duke and six crew were accorded Thanks of the Institution Inscribed on Vellum.

Portrush RNLI Station Mechanic Dave Robinson was awarded a Vellum for his role in saving the life of a teenage boy in the sea off Portstewart Head in 2020. The lifeboat mechanic attached himself to a heaving line before jumping into the turbulent water and bringing the exhausted young man to safety. More information including video of the rescue here.

Portrush RNLI Station Mechanic Dave RobinsonHRH with Portrush RNLI Station Mechanic Dave Robinson Photo: Beaumont Photography

Lifeboat crew at Portrush RNLI are receiving two awards from the Institution for the rescue. Along with the Vellum for Dave Robinson, the Coxswain Des Austin, will receive a Chairman’s Letter of Thanks for ‘his professionalism, seamanship, and leadership under severe pressure’ during the rescue. He will receive his Letter at a presentation to be held locally later.

The callout occurred on Friday September 25th, 2020, when lifeboat crew responded to reports of a young boy spotted in the water off Portstewart Head. On arrival at the scene, lifeboat crew observed a teenage boy in the surf, waving his arms and flailing, while being pulled out to sea by the tide. In a dramatic rescue, a heaving line was attached to Mechanic Dave Robinson’s lifejacket, and he entered the water to reach the teenager, keeping hold of him in the choppy waters. Coxswain Des Austin manoeuvred the lifeboat in the breaking swell, to keep as close as possible to the casualty, while the mechanic kept hold of the boy until the lifeboat crew were able to hoist both to safety and return to shore.

Mark Dowie, RNLI Chief Executive said: ‘RNLI gallantry awards are given for saving life at sea and celebrate the courage, skill and dedication shown by our charity’s lifesavers.

‘To receive their awards at St James’s Palace from The Duke of Kent is an honour and as the charity’s chief executive, I am humbled and proud of all our volunteers and employees that make up this incredible institution. Every one of them and their families give so much to the charity and our purpose of saving lives at sea.’

Commenting on the honour for the station, Portrush RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Beni McAllister said, ‘Words can’t describe how proud I am of our incredible lifeboat crew in Portrush. We are all delighted for Dave on his gallantry award and for Des who will also be recognised for his role in the rescue. No crewmember goes out to get recognition or reward. They are selfless people who drop everything to answer a call for help and the people they leave behind at home and in the community take great pride in their actions. We had a full crew onboard the lifeboat that day, each one of them focused on saving that young boy’s life.’

Portrush RNLI mechanic and Vellum recipient Dave Robinson added, ‘Receiving the RNLI Gallantry award from HRH the Duke of Kent was a huge honour and I felt I was receiving it on behalf of all the crew in Portrush RNLI. I remember that day so clearly and I knew that boy had only minutes left before he was in danger of drowning. I entered the water and trusted in my crew and my training and just went for it. That poor boy was exhausted when I reached him and the whole crew were elated that he was saved. I’m grateful for the Vellum and to receive it with my wife, Livvy, by my side.’

Among the awardees where the Coxswains of three Irish lifeboats Eamonn O’Rourke (Rosslare), Eugene Kehoe (Kilmore Quay) and Roy Abrahamsson (Dunmore East) who were all presented with Bronze Medals for Gallantry for their role in a rescue in October 2020 that saved nine lives and prevented a 100-metre cargo vessel, the Lily B, carrying 4,000 tonnes of coal, from hitting rocks at Hook Head. More info here

Coxswain Eamonn O’Rourke was also accorded a vellum for a rescue during Storm Ophelia in 2017 during conditions described by the crew as some of the worst they had ever witnessed. The crew battled 10-metre seas in force 12 conditions to save three lives. More information here

HRH The Duke of Kent has been President of the RNLI since 1969 after succeeding both his parents as President of the charity.

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The volunteer crew of the Bundoran RNLI Lifeboat was called into action on Friday afternoon 13th May to assist two male surfers in difficulty at Rossnowlagh Beach in County Donegal.

Just after 3:35 pm a number of 999 emergency calls were made to Malin Head Coast Guard from passers-by on Rossnowlagh Beach who had heard calls for help coming from the water.

The Bundoran RNLI crew, aboard the “William Henry Liddington” inshore lifeboat, launched minutes later and made their way to the scene.

Amid choppy conditions and a force 5 westerly wind, the lifeboat arrived at Rossnowlagh Beach around 4 pm. On arrival, the men had already been lifted from the water by the Sligo based Rescue 118 helicopter which had also been tasked to help. They were brought back to land where they were attended to by members of the National Ambulance Service.

Helm of the Bundoran RNLI Lifeboat Elliot Kearns, speaking on returning to the station, emphasised the importance of being aware of the surf and potential hazards ‘we would like to commend the Rescue 118 crew for their swift action in bringing the two men to safety. We would always advise water users to be aware of the sea conditions, particularly rip currents. If you find yourself caught in a rip, don’t try to swim against it, instead swim to the left or the right to get free of it.’

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On Sunday afternoon, 12 February, Valentia Coast Guard requested Lough Derg RNLI lifeboat to launch to investigate a report from a member of the public that a kayaker was in difficulty by Navigation Mark J, at the northern end of Lough Derg

At 3.40 pm the lifeboat launched with helm Keith Brennan, crew Owen Cavanagh, Chris Parker and Tom Hayes on board. Winds were south-westerly Force 4 and gusting. Visibility was good.

When the lifeboat arrived at Navigation Mark J, north of Gortmore, it began a thorough search of the area. From shore, two swimmers at Gortmore observed the lifeboat and called the RNLI boathouse in Dromineer, suspecting that the water-board which they had been using as a safety buoy may have caused alarm. The board was at the location at which the member of the public had thought they’d seen an upturned kayak.

Valentia Coast Guard were informed and the lifeboat was stood down.

The lifeboat departed the scene and was back at station at 4.50 pm.

Jeremy Freeman, Deputy Launching Authority at Lough Derg RNLI said ‘this was a false alarm but with good intent’. He says ‘if you see someone in difficulty in the water call 999 or 112 and ask for marine rescue. Stay safe and not to not enter the water yourself, too many people drown trying to save others.’

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Helvick Head RNLI of County Waterford came to the aid of two fishermen yesterday (Wednesday 12 January) after their 29ft fishing boat broke down at Ballyvoyle.

On what was described as a sunny and calm day on the water, the volunteer crew were requested to launch their inshore lifeboat by the Irish Coast Guard at 12.50 pm following a report that the vessel needed assistance at Ballyvoyle, close to Clonea beach.

Launching at 1.03 pm, the lifeboat helmed by Joe Foley and with crew members Alan Kelly, Shane Walsh and Liam Harty onboard, made its way to the scene arriving at 1.12 pm. 

Helvick Head RNLI with the fishing boat under towHelvick Head RNLI with the fishing boat under tow

The lifeboat crew assessed the situation and found the fishermen to be safe and well. As the boat had sustained engine failure, a decision was made to tow the vessel back to Helvick Head Pier where they arrived at 1.50 pm.

Speaking following the call out, Sean Walsh, Helvick Head RNLI Deputy Launching Authority said: ‘The casualties did the right thing by calling for help when they realised they were in difficulty.

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A Lough Derg “Lap the lake” 130 km cycle is raising funds for RNLI Lough Derg this May 

Starting and finishing at the well-known harbour of Dromineer, parking and showers will be available at nearby Lough Derg Yacht Club. 

Lough Derg is the third-biggest on the island of Ireland. It is a long, narrow lake, with shore roads in counties Clare, Galway, and Tipperary for the cyclists to navigate.

Event tickets are €65 per person and will include a t-shirt and goody bag. We would love participants to raise another €65 or more and donate a total of €130 for 130km. All funds raised go to Lough Derg RNLI. 

Bookings are now open for places here and download the poster below.

Lap the Lake” Cycle Will Raise Funds for RNLI

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Ireland's Trading Ketch Ilen

The Ilen is the last of Ireland’s traditional wooden sailing ships.

Designed by Limerick man Conor O’Brien and built in Baltimore in 1926, she was delivered by Munster men to the Falkland Islands where she served valiantly for seventy years, enduring and enjoying the Roaring Forties, the Furious Fifties, and Screaming Sixties.

Returned now to Ireland and given a new breath of life, Ilen may be described as the last of Ireland’s timber-built ocean-going sailing ships, yet at a mere 56ft, it is capable of visiting most of the small harbours of Ireland.

Wooden Sailing Ship Ilen FAQs

The Ilen is the last of Ireland’s traditional wooden sailing ships.

The Ilen was designed by Conor O’Brien, the first Irish man to circumnavigate the world.

Ilen is named for the West Cork River which flows to the sea at Baltimore, her home port.

The Ilen was built by Baltimore Sea Fisheries School, West Cork in 1926. Tom Moynihan was foreman.

Ilen's wood construction is of oak ribs and planks of larch.

As-built initially, she is 56 feet in length overall with a beam of 14 feet and a displacement of 45 tonnes.

Conor O’Brien set sail in August 1926 with two Cadogan cousins from Cape Clear in West Cork, arriving at Port Stanley in January 1927 and handed it over to the new owners.

The Ilen was delivered to the Falkland Islands Company, in exchange for £1,500.

Ilen served for over 70 years as a cargo ship and a ferry in the Falkland Islands, enduring and enjoying the Roaring Forties, the Furious Fifties, and Screaming Sixties. She stayed in service until the early 1990s.

Limerick sailor Gary McMahon and his team located Ilen. MacMahon started looking for her in 1996 and went out to the Falklands and struck a deal with the owner to bring her back to Ireland.

After a lifetime of hard work in the Falklands, Ilen required a ground-up rebuild.

A Russian cargo ship transported her back on a 12,000-mile trip from the Southern Oceans to Dublin. The Ilen was discharged at the Port of Dublin 1997, after an absence from Ireland of 70 years.

It was a collaboration between the Ilen Project in Limerick and Hegarty’s Boatyard in Old Court, near Skibbereen. Much of the heavy lifting, of frames, planking, deadwood & backbone, knees, floors, shelves and stringers, deck beams, and carlins, was done in Hegarty’s. The generally lighter work of preparing sole, bulkheads, deck‐houses fixed furniture, fixtures & fittings, deck fittings, machinery, systems, tanks, spar making and rigging is being done at the Ilen boat building school in Limerick.

Ten years. The boat was much the worse for wear when it returned to West Cork in May 1998, and it remained dormant for ten years before the start of a decade-long restoration.

Ilen now serves as a community floating classroom and cargo vessel – visiting 23 ports in 2019 and making a transatlantic crossing to Greenland as part of a relationship-building project to link youth in Limerick City with youth in Nuuk, west Greenland.

At a mere 56ft, Ilen is capable of visiting most of the small harbours of Ireland.

©Afloat 2020