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The operator of the Rosslare-Dunkirk route, DFDS, has entered into an agreement with ferry manufacturer Incat Tasmania to conduct a design study for a hybrid-electric ferry intended to be deployed for the Channel Islands if DFDS wins an upcoming tender for future services.

The initiative is a part of the DFDS’ efforts to contribute to the decarbonisation of maritime transport.

DFDS has commissioned Tasmanian ferry manufacturer Incat to conduct a design study for a 72-metre-long hybrid electric ferry with the option of converting it to a fully electric vessel.

The ferry could potentially accommodate both freight and passenger transport and be deployed on routes to and from the Channel Islands and France should DFDS be awarded the upcoming tender for the ferry services on the Islands.

Torben Carlsen, CEO of DFDS, says: “The hybrid electric ferry will be part of our vision for the future ferry solution for the Channel Islands. Electrification of short sea routes is the future, and with the design study, we can fast-track the green transition, ushering in a new era of low-emission maritime transport. This will not be easy. We need to ensure a sufficient power supply on land and infrastructure to accommodate recharging facilities in ports. But I am confident that we can work together with the ports, governments, and communities on the Channel Islands to make this happen”

The framework of the design study will depend on the requirements for the upcoming tender and the needs and wishes of the local communities in Guernsey and Jersey and can be changed to accommodate any new circumstances.

The design study will analyse various specifications, including capacity, propulsion, passenger area layout, etc. In terms of propulsion, DFDS expects to focus on a hybrid solution until sufficient charging infrastructure is available in the relevant ports.

Published in Ferry
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Candela, the electric hydrofoil vessel manufacturer, has secured €24.5m in funding, marking the largest round in the company's history.

The funding will be used to expand production of the Candela P-12 ferry, the first fast and long-range electric ferry on the market. The P-12 uses hydrofoil technology to cut lifetime emissions by 97.5% compared to diesel vessels while allowing operators to halve costs. Groupe Beneteau, the world's largest boat manufacturer, was a key partner in the funding round.

Candela's hydrofoil craft use 80% less energy than other ships and boats, offering operators lower operational costs and incentivising a transition to sustainable vessels

Published in Ferry

The bow of the former Aran island ferry Naomh Éanna, which has been broken up for scrap, is en route to Galway.

As The Irish Independent reports, Port of Galway harbourmaster Capt Brian Sheridan hopes to take delivery of the bow within the coming weeks.

He has said he is “thrilled to have secured the bow section” and plans to restore it and have it displayed on the quays in Galway “as a reminder of the historic trading link” between the city and the Aran islands.

He said it was “ a sad day for maritime Ireland that plans to save the ship fell foul of a raft of issues”.

Capt Sheridan had supported efforts to return the ferry to Galway for marine heritage and tourism purposes, after images of it listing to one side in Dublin’s Grand Canal basin prompted calls for it to be saved.

Year-long efforts to realise that failed, and a decision was made to scrap the deteriorating hull.

A contract was awarded last year to Cunningham Civil and Marine to dismantle it.

The bow of the former Aran island ferry Naomh ÉannaThe bow of the former Aran island ferry Naomh Éanna

The 65-year-old ship formerly run by CIÉ as a passenger ferry serving the Aran islands from Galway had been one of the last large vessels built by the Liffey Dockyard Company.

Shortly after it began serving the island route, it was drafted in to the search for survivors of the KLM flight 607E which crashed into the Atlantic ocean some 160 km west of Connemara shortly after take-off from Shannon airport in August 1958.

As Afloat has previously reported, Inis Mór resident Micheál Ó Goill has said islanders had mixed memories of it as sailings could take six to seven hours.

Although it was “not a good weather boat”, it had its own sick bay for use by pregnant women and others, and it also had a bar.

The Naomh Éanna was withdrawn from service in 1986, and was then purchased by the Irish Nautical Trust which brought it to Dublin’s Grand Canal basin.

It was part of the “set” in the 1996 Neil Jordan film on Michael Collins, and was used as a floating surf shop.

The most recent owner, Sam Field Corbett of Irish Ship and Barge Fabrication Company Limited (ISBF) sought Fáilte Ireland support to have it restored as a tourism project or a floating hotel.

When that was unsuccessful, Galway City Council was approached, but it told him there would be “planning issues”.

Fáilte Ireland has said that the owners of the Naomh Eanna applied for Fáilte Ireland capital funding under the Large Grant Scheme 2016 scheme, but the application “was not successful as it did not meet the minimum eligibility criteria necessary”.

Richard Cunningham of Cunningham Civil and Marine said that his company would deliver the bow to Galway, and several other artefacts associated with the ship, including its propeller, anchors and chain, would be saved for historic purposes.

Read The Irish Independent here

Published in Historic Boats

Kerry's Peig Sayers ferry has been a popular mode of transportation for tourists travelling from Dingle Harbour to the Great Blasket Island for more than two decades.

The island ferry is owned by Billy O'Connor, who took over the business from his grandfather and granduncle in 2014. Billy operates the Great Blasket Island Experience, a seasonal tourism enterprise that offers full-day eco-tours from April to October and overnight stays in three cottages on the island. The ferry, a Red Bay Stormforce 11 RIB built in County Antrim, also transports goods from the mainland throughout the year and manages the island's ecosystem during the off-season.

The island ferry is owned by Billy O'Connor, who took over the business from his grandfather and granduncle in 2014The island ferry is owned by Billy O'Connor, who took over the business from his grandfather and granduncle in 2014

However, the ageing ferry has been causing problems for Billy's business due to frequent engine breakdowns. To address this issue, the Brexit Blue Economy Enterprise Scheme, implemented by Bord Iaschaigh Mhara (BIM), has awarded a grant worth €65,000 for fitting the Peig Sayers with new engines. This investment will make the boat more reliable and improve the overall business. The new engines will give the Peig Sayers a new lease of life, ensuring that Kerry's famous ferry will continue to provide invaluable service throughout the year.

Published in Ferry

On Saturday, August 26th, Galway Girl Cruises will set sail from Galway Docks, inviting passengers on a cultural journey of discovery, music, and folklore. The tour is operated by 3rd generation seafaring brothers, Tommy and Patrick Connolly, who will be accompanied by a special lineup of musical guests.

The newest boat tour offering on Galway Bay, Galway Girl Cruises, is more than just a sightseeing experience, say the promoters.

It promises passengers an immersive cultural experience, celebrating Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way. From traditional music sessions to engaging maritime stories, every moment onboard offers a glimpse into the heart and soul of Galway.

Patrick Connolly, skipper and traditional boatbuilder, says that the tours are not just about a boat trip but about sharing cultural heritage, stories, and music of their ancestors. He adds, "Our family has always been tied to the sea, and we are honoured to share this legacy and love of the ocean with others."

The Galway Bay Cruise offers breathtaking views of famous landmarks such as Gleninagh Castle, Black Head Lighthouse, Martello towers, and the distant Aran Islands, with live commentary. Passengers will be entertained with vibrant storytelling of Galway coast's maritime misadventures and captivated by traditional Irish music and dance performances by the crew and a host of special guests.

The Connolly brothers have crafted an unforgettable 90-minute experience that resonates with the heartbeat of Ireland, beyond just a cruise. Passengers are promised a journey that's both scenic and deeply cultural, from the raw beauty of the Burren to the majestic Aran Islands on the horizon.

Tommy Connolly says, "Travelling through the water brings a sense of venturing into the unknown. The ever-changing light, wind conditions, and potential wildlife sightings make every journey a new adventure. Be it birds, dolphins, or even whales, there's always something wondrous to see and feel."

The Devane Brothers, Patrick and Gerard, who are 5th generation 'sean-nós' (old-style) dancers and musicians from Connemara, will join the crew on Saturday, August 26th.

Passengers are invited to come aboard, soak in the rugged beauty of Galway's coast, and get ready for a rhythmic and soul-stirring Irish musical treat. Join the crew for some good craic on the Galway Girl Cruises launch. Secure your spot now here

Published in Galway Harbour
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Aran Island businessman Tarlach de Blacam has called on Minister for Rural and Community Development Heather Humphreys to withdraw a tender for a new cargo vessel service to Inis Meáin due to the “highly dangerous” nature of the main pier.

As The Sunday Independent reports, de Blacam of Cniotáil Inis Meáin (Inis Meáin Knitting Company) has warned that lives are at risk if the pier at An Córa continues to be used.

Two people died, and there have been several ferry accidents at the pier at An Córa on Inis Meáin since its construction.

Tarlach de Blacam of Inis MeainTarlach de Blacam of Inis Meain Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

Former Gaeltacht and Islands minister Eamon Ó Cuív (FF) says he supports de Blacam’s call and says an alternative and safer pier, An Caladh Mór, should be completed and used by State-funded ferry services.

Ó Cuiv says Ms Humphreys, who has just published a new ten-year island policy this week, must respond positively to the demand on safety grounds.

A study by consultants Kirk McClure Morton in 2004 commissioned by Galway County Council and funded by the Department of the Gaeltacht stated that the pier at An Córa on Inis Meáin could only provide safe berthage for 70 per cent of the time “in a typical year”.

The 2004 report identified the alternative, An Caladh Mór, as “most suitable for providing safe and reliable access to Inis Meáin by sea”.

Read The Sunday Independent here

Published in Island News
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A two million euro project to develop a “zero emissions” solution for high-speed passenger ferries is yielding positive results, according to the research team led by Solent University in England.

The group also involving Chartwell Marine and Newcastle Marine Services, aims to develop an electric hydro-foiling high-speed trimaran, which can carry up to 40 passengers on short to medium-range coastal routes.

The project is being funded by Innovate UK, a British government initiative.

Initial testing has demonstrated the potential for a foiling trimaran with low drag and power requirements, according to Giles Barkley, leader of Solent University’s yacht engineering-based degrees.

“A traditional, diesel-powered, 40-passenger catamaran ferry operating at 25 knots typically requires well over 1000kw of power,” Barkley says.

“The trimaran foiling ferry concept has the potential to reach 28 knots using just 250kW of power - equivalent to the power used by two modern electric family cars (2×125Kw motors),” he says.

“This means it is possible to power the craft using zero-emission electric motors, with a significant reduction in associated fuel and operational costs compared to a traditional diesel craft,” he says.

Solent University project lead Dr Laurie Wright, who is associate professor of marine sustainability, says that recent advancements in electrical propulsion technology mean “zero-emission, low-drag, high-speed medium-capacity passenger vessels are now viable”.

"These types of passenger vessels can open “blue corridors”, encouraging a shift from road to alternative transport on otherwise underutilised coastal waterways,” Wright says.

The UK Government is funding the development of new clean maritime technology across a two-year period in 12 regions. It aims to generate highly skilled jobs and position Britain as a “world leader in low carbon maritime”.

Published in Ferry
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Cape Clear Ferries has announced its summer schedule for West Cork, taking in Baltimore, Cape Clear Island, The Fastnet Rock and Schull.

The announcement comes amid considerable excitement at the launch of the newest addition to their fleet – the ‘Carraig Aonair’ (formerly Spirit of Doolin).

The Carrig Aonair is certified to carry 200 passengers to Ireland’s most southerly point. Most importantly, the ferry is weatherproof and built to withstand unpredictable Irish weather conditions.

Just in time for summer, visitors can circumnavigate the iconic Fastnet Rock Lighthouse in the comfortable surrounds of the new ferry – with panoramic 360 views from both inside and out - with large saloon windows to enjoy the view and seating for 100 passengers inside.

The Launch of Cape Clear Ferries’ new-200 passenger fast ferry (the Carraig Aonair). The multi-award-winning ferry service takes in Baltimore, Cape Clear Island, The Fastnet Rock and Schull with panoramic 360 views from both inside and out Photo: Miki BarlokThe Launch of Cape Clear Ferries’ new-200 passenger fast ferry (the Carraig Aonair). The multi-award-winning ferry service takes in Baltimore, Cape Clear Island, The Fastnet Rock and Schull with panoramic 360 views from both inside and out Photo: Miki Barlok

The tour has also been named among the top tours in Ireland by National Geographic and has topped the bill as an outstanding West Cork Maritime Tourism experience. Fáilte Ireland has also featured footage of one of its ferries rounding the Fastnet Rock in its national and international television ads.

Speaking in relation to the launch of the summer schedule, Karen Cottrell from Cape Clear Ferries said:

“There is always great excitement and anticipation ahead of our regular schedule launches at the beginning of the summer season, but this year we are thrilled to have the option to provide faster and more frequent tours around the famous Fastnet Rock – the tallest and widest rock lighthouse in Ireland and the UK.

“This offers a brilliant backdrop for great family adventures - sailing around the towering rock, savouring its rich history and magnificent location, often seeing whales, dolphins and basking sharks en route.

“Passengers can also visit the picturesque Cape Clear Island and the Queen of Carbery’s Hundred Isles, while those who want to take the tour as the sun sets can avail of our hugely popular twilight tours, which return again this year.

Meanwhile, a sister company, Cork Harbour Cruises, was established to showcase the coastal areas along Cork City, passing Blackrock Castle and on to Cobh, (and recently named ‘Best New Business’ at this year’s Cork Business Association Awards) also continues its scenic harbour tours. Docked at Custom House Quay at the centre of Cork City, it will also welcome passengers on board throughout the summer with corporate packages and twilight tours available.

Published in Ferry
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A fuel leak is believed to have caused a fire on board a passenger ferry linking Ballyhack, Co Wexford with Passage East in Waterford, last year.

A Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB) report says the crew of the Frazer Tintern reacted immediately after the master of the vessel detected a strong smell of diesel fuel while en route to Passage East in early August 2021.

A crew member had also called the master to say he could also detect a strong smell of the fuel and was going to investigate. The incident occurred at around 18.05 hours on August 5th, 2021.

The MCIB report says that when the crew member got to the mesh door at the number one (No.1) engine compartment, he was met with black smoke and flames.

“The crewmember notified the master straight away that they had a fire onboard. The master immediately shut down the No.1 engine and turned off the engine room fans,” it says.

“Two crewmembers then activated two portable fire extinguishers and rigged fire hoses to provide boundary cooling,”it says.

The vessel continued to the Passage East slipway to get passengers off as quickly and safely as possible, it says, although the fire was brought under control.

It says that on arrival, all passengers and vehicles were “disembarked in a safe manner”.

“The vessel was then secured, and the remaining engines shut down. When the smoke dispersed fully, the crew investigated the engine room to confirm the fire had been extinguished,”it says.

The two-deck crewmembers used portable fire extinguishers, the fire was knocked back, and fire hoses were run out to provide boundary cooling while the master continued to navigate the vessel towards Passage East slipway, it says.

The report says that the machinery space fire suppression system was not operated. The vessel was moored up, and the remaining engines were shut down.

“The three crewmembers then carried out a visual inspection of the engine compartment after the remaining smoke had dispersed and confirmed that the fire was fully extinguished,” it says.

The MCIB report says the fire was “most likely caused by a return line fuel leak on No.1 main engine providing fuel to the area”.

It says that the volume and pressure of the fuel was greatly increased by the fuel return line being blocked or shut off, while the ambient high temperature and swirling airflow in the vicinity assisted in the atomisation of the fuel.

It says the fuel may have been ignited by arcing of the No.1 main engine alternator, but it was more likely to have been from fuel spraying onto hot surfaces such as the engine exhaust manifold or turbocharger casing.

It says that shutting down the engine removed the source of fuel from the fire and would have had a far greater effect in extinguishing it than the use of portable extinguishers.

It says that due to the extent of the fire and subsequent damage to No.1 engine, “the exact location and cause of the fuel leak has been impossible to determine”.

It recommends that the owners/operators should ensure that all return line flexible fuel hoses are fixed as per the engine manufacturer’s recommendations.

It also says the owners/operators should arrange to have the airflow from the machinery space ducted away from the main car deck and clear of any public areas. This is to ensure that a fire in the machinery space will not impinge on public areas.

It says the owners/operators should arrange to have the shut-off valves removed from the fuel system return lines to prevent the potential of over-pressurisation of the system. It also recommends that they need to ensure that the firefighting procedures and domestic safety management systems put in place post the incident are “followed and practiced and logged regularly”.

The MCIB reports recommends that the Minister for Transport should issue a marine notice to owners/masters of passenger vessels to remind them that “in the case of a fire or other potentially serious incident a distress/Pan Pan call as appropriate should be made at the earliest opportunity”.

It also says the minister should request a review of manning and crew qualification requirements for Class IV passenger vessels operating in restricted waters as per action 25 of the Maritime Safety Strategy of 2015.

It notes that the owners initiated an internal enquiry into the incident immediately before any repairs were undertaken.

“ This enquiry yielded some useful information on the history of the event”, the MCIB says, but it "did not clearly identify the root cause of the fire".

It says it did lead to the operators adopting a safety management system to improve processes onboard.

It says that since the incident, the door leading to No.1 engine compartment on the ferry was fitted with a weight and magnetic lock so that it closes automatically when the fire alarm is activated.

Published in MCIB
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Doolin Ferry Company has set sail for the summer season, with their state-of-the-art ferries operating once again from Doolin Pier to the Aran Islands. Passengers can also opt to board a Cliffs of Moher cruise, or the Seafari experience, which was introduced in 2021.

With the popularity of the Aran Islands continuing to increase year on year, the family-run business now offers up to 20 sailings per day between Inis Óirr, Inis Mór and Inis Meáin.

As a top destination in the West of Ireland, the Aran Islands offer visitors the chance to step back in time and experience Irish culture in its truest and most traditional forms.

The Doolin Ferry Co. Seafari Launch The Doolin Ferry Co. Seafari Launch

Doolin Ferry Co. holds the largest and fastest ferry fleet operating on the Wild Atlantic Way. Doolin Ferry Co’s one of a kind ‘Seafari’ experience takes place onboard an exclusive, private 10 seater rib.

The rib is designed to allow you unrivalled, close up views of the entire Clare Coast while sheltering you from the elements with an optional canopy if the need arises.

Doolin Ferry Co’s private charters allow you to dictate the itinerary so no two journeys onboard are ever the same.

Published in Ferry
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Irish Olympic Sailing Team

Ireland has a proud representation in sailing at the Olympics dating back to 1948. Today there is a modern governing structure surrounding the selection of sailors the Olympic Regatta

Irish Olympic Sailing FAQs

Ireland’s representation in sailing at the Olympics dates back to 1948, when a team consisting of Jimmy Mooney (Firefly), Alf Delany and Hugh Allen (Swallow) competed in that year’s Summer Games in London (sailing off Torquay). Except for the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, Ireland has sent at least one sailor to every Summer Games since then.

  • 1948 – London (Torquay) — Firefly: Jimmy Mooney; Swallow: Alf Delany, Hugh Allen
  • 1952 – Helsinki — Finn: Alf Delany * 1956 – Melbourne — Finn: J Somers Payne
  • 1960 – Rome — Flying Dutchman: Johnny Hooper, Peter Gray; Dragon: Jimmy Mooney, David Ryder, Robin Benson; Finn: J Somers Payne
  • 1964 – Tokyo — Dragon: Eddie Kelliher, Harry Maguire, Rob Dalton; Finn: Johnny Hooper 
  • 1972 – Munich (Kiel) — Tempest: David Wilkins, Sean Whitaker; Dragon: Robin Hennessy, Harry Byrne, Owen Delany; Finn: Kevin McLaverty; Flying Dutchman: Harold Cudmore, Richard O’Shea
  • 1976 – Montreal (Kingston) — 470: Robert Dix, Peter Dix; Flying Dutchman: Barry O’Neill, Jamie Wilkinson; Tempest: David Wilkins, Derek Jago
  • 1980 – Moscow (Tallinn) — Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Jamie Wilkinson (Silver medalists) * 1984 – Los Angeles — Finn: Bill O’Hara
  • 1988 – Seoul (Pusan) — Finn: Bill O’Hara; Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Peter Kennedy; 470 (Women): Cathy MacAleavy, Aisling Byrne
  • 1992 – Barcelona — Europe: Denise Lyttle; Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Peter Kennedy; Star: Mark Mansfield, Tom McWilliam
  • 1996 – Atlanta (Savannah) — Laser: Mark Lyttle; Europe: Aisling Bowman (Byrne); Finn: John Driscoll; Star: Mark Mansfield, David Burrows; 470 (Women): Denise Lyttle, Louise Cole; Soling: Marshall King, Dan O’Grady, Garrett Connolly
  • 2000 – Sydney — Europe: Maria Coleman; Finn: David Burrows; Star: Mark Mansfield, David O'Brien
  • 2004 – Athens — Europe: Maria Coleman; Finn: David Burrows; Star: Mark Mansfield, Killian Collins; 49er: Tom Fitzpatrick, Fraser Brown; 470: Gerald Owens, Ross Killian; Laser: Rory Fitzpatrick
  • 2008 – Beijing (Qingdao) — Star: Peter O’Leary, Stephen Milne; Finn: Tim Goodbody; Laser Radial: Ciara Peelo; 470: Gerald Owens, Phil Lawton
  • 2012 – London (Weymouth) — Star: Peter O’Leary, David Burrows; 49er: Ryan Seaton, Matt McGovern; Laser Radial: Annalise Murphy; Laser: James Espey; 470: Gerald Owens, Scott Flanigan
  • 2016 – Rio — Laser Radial (Women): Annalise Murphy (Silver medalist); 49er: Ryan Seaton, Matt McGovern; 49erFX: Andrea Brewster, Saskia Tidey; Laser: Finn Lynch; Paralympic Sonar: John Twomey, Ian Costello & Austin O’Carroll

Ireland has won two Olympics medals in sailing events, both silver: David Wilkins, Jamie Wilkinson in the Flying Dutchman at Moscow 1980, and Annalise Murphy in the Laser Radial at Rio 2016.

The current team, as of December 2020, consists of Laser sailors Finn Lynch, Liam Glynn and Ewan McMahon, 49er pairs Ryan Seaton and Seafra Guilfoyle, and Sean Waddilove and Robert Dickson, as well as Laser Radial sailors Annalise Murphy and Aoife Hopkins.

Irish Sailing is the National Governing Body for sailing in Ireland.

Irish Sailing’s Performance division is responsible for selecting and nurturing Olympic contenders as part of its Performance Pathway.

The Performance Pathway is Irish Sailing’s Olympic talent pipeline. The Performance Pathway counts over 70 sailors from 11 years up in its programme.The Performance Pathway is made up of Junior, Youth, Academy, Development and Olympic squads. It provides young, talented and ambitious Irish sailors with opportunities to move up through the ranks from an early age. With up to 100 young athletes training with the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway, every aspect of their performance is planned and closely monitored while strong relationships are simultaneously built with the sailors and their families

Rory Fitzpatrick is the head coach of Irish Sailing Performance. He is a graduate of University College Dublin and was an Athens 2004 Olympian in the Laser class.

The Performance Director of Irish Sailing is James O’Callaghan. Since 2006 James has been responsible for the development and delivery of athlete-focused, coach-led, performance-measured programmes across the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway. A Business & Economics graduate of Trinity College Dublin, he is a Level 3 Qualified Coach and Level 2 Coach Tutor. He has coached at five Olympic Games and numerous European and World Championship events across multiple Olympic classes. He is also a member of the Irish Sailing Foundation board.

Annalise Murphy is by far and away the biggest Irish sailing star. Her fourth in London 2012 when she came so agonisingly close to a bronze medal followed by her superb silver medal performance four years later at Rio won the hearts of Ireland. Murphy is aiming to go one better in Tokyo 2021. 

Under head coach Rory Fitzpatrick, the coaching staff consists of Laser Radial Academy coach Sean Evans, Olympic Laser coach Vasilij Zbogar and 49er team coach Matt McGovern.

The Irish Government provides funding to Irish Sailing. These funds are exclusively for the benefit of the Performance Pathway. However, this falls short of the amount required to fund the Performance Pathway in order to allow Ireland compete at the highest level. As a result the Performance Pathway programme currently receives around €850,000 per annum from Sport Ireland and €150,000 from sponsorship. A further €2 million per annum is needed to have a major impact at the highest level. The Irish Sailing Foundation was established to bridge the financial gap through securing philanthropic donations, corporate giving and sponsorship.

The vision of the Irish Sailing Foundation is to generate the required financial resources for Ireland to scale-up and execute its world-class sailing programme. Irish Sailing works tirelessly to promote sailing in Ireland and abroad and has been successful in securing funding of 1 million euro from Sport Ireland. However, to compete on a par with other nations, a further €2 million is required annually to realise the ambitions of our talented sailors. For this reason, the Irish Sailing Foundation was formed to seek philanthropic donations. Led by a Board of Directors and Head of Development Kathryn Grace, the foundation lads a campaign to bridge the financial gap to provide the Performance Pathway with the funds necessary to increase coaching hours, upgrade equipment and provide world class sport science support to a greater number of high-potential Irish sailors.

The Senior and Academy teams of the Performance Pathway are supported with the provision of a coach, vehicle, coach boat and boats. Even with this level of subsidy there is still a large financial burden on individual families due to travel costs, entry fees and accommodation. There are often compromises made on the amount of days a coach can be hired for and on many occasions it is necessary to opt out of major competitions outside Europe due to cost. Money raised by the Irish Sailing Foundation will go towards increased quality coaching time, world-class equipment, and subsiding entry fees and travel-related costs. It also goes towards broadening the base of talented sailors that can consider campaigning by removing financial hurdles, and the Performance HQ in Dublin to increase efficiency and reduce logistical issues.

The ethos of the Performance Pathway is progression. At each stage international performance benchmarks are utilised to ensure the sailors are meeting expectations set. The size of a sailor will generally dictate which boat they sail. The classes selected on the pathway have been identified as the best feeder classes for progression. Currently the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway consists of the following groups: * Pathway (U15) Optimist and Topper * Youth Academy (U19) Laser 4.7, Laser Radial and 420 * Development Academy (U23) Laser, Laser Radial, 49er, 49erFX * Team IRL (direct-funded athletes) Laser, Laser Radial, 49er, 49erFX

The Irish Sailing performance director produces a detailed annual budget for the programme which is presented to Sport Ireland, Irish Sailing and the Foundation for detailed discussion and analysis of the programme, where each item of expenditure is reviewed and approved. Each year, the performance director drafts a Performance Plan and Budget designed to meet the objectives of Irish Performance Sailing based on an annual review of the Pathway Programmes from Junior to Olympic level. The plan is then presented to the Olympic Steering Group (OSG) where it is independently assessed and the budget is agreed. The OSG closely monitors the delivery of the plan ensuring it meets the agreed strategy, is within budget and in line with operational plans. The performance director communicates on an ongoing basis with the OSG throughout the year, reporting formally on a quarterly basis.

Due to the specialised nature of Performance Sport, Irish Sailing established an expert sub-committee which is referred to as the Olympic Steering Group (OSG). The OSG is chaired by Patrick Coveney and its objective is centred around winning Olympic medals so it oversees the delivery of the Irish Sailing’s Performance plan.

At Junior level (U15) sailors learn not only to be a sailor but also an athlete. They develop the discipline required to keep a training log while undertaking fitness programmes, attending coaching sessions and travelling to competitions. During the winter Regional Squads take place and then in spring the National Squads are selected for Summer Competitions. As sailors move into Youth level (U19) there is an exhaustive selection matrix used when considering a sailor for entry into the Performance Academy. Completion of club training programmes, attendance at the performance seminars, physical suitability and also progress at Junior and Youth competitions are assessed and reviewed. Once invited in to the Performance Academy, sailors are given a six-month trial before a final decision is made on their selection. Sailors in the Academy are very closely monitored and engage in a very well planned out sailing, training and competition programme. There are also defined international benchmarks which these sailors are required to meet by a certain age. Biannual reviews are conducted transparently with the sailors so they know exactly where they are performing well and they are made aware of where they may need to improve before the next review.

©Afloat 2020

Paris 2024 Olympic Sailing Competition

Where is the Paris 2024 Olympic Sailing Competition being held? Sailing at Paris 2024 will take place in Marseille on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea between 28 July and 8 August, and will feature Kiteboarding for the first time, following a successful Olympic debut in 2018 at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires. The sailing event is over 700 km from the main Olympic Games venue in Paris.

What are the events? The Olympic Sailing Competition at Paris 2024 will feature ten Events:

  • Women’s: Windsurfing, Kite, Dinghy, Skiff
  • Men’s: Windsurfing, Kite, Dinghy, Skiff
  • Mixed: Dinghy, Multihull

How do you qualify for Paris 2024?  The first opportunity for athletes to qualify for Paris 2024 will be the Sailing World Championships, The Hague 2023, followed by the Men’s and Women’s Dinghy 2024 World Championships and then a qualifier on each of World Sailing’s six continents in each of the ten Events. The final opportunity is a last chance regatta to be held in 2024, just a few months before the Games begin.

50-50 split between male and female athletes: The Paris 2024 Games is set to be the first to achieve a 50-50 split between male and female athletes, building on the progress made at both Rio 2016 (47.5%) and Tokyo 2020 (48.8%). It will also be the first Olympic Games where two of the three Chief roles in the sailing event will be held by female officials,