Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Dublin Port

Dublin Port Company (DPC), in collaboration with University College Dublin (UCD), proudly announces a groundbreaking initiative aimed at enhancing biodiversity along the Great South Wall. This innovative project marks a significant milestone in the realm of eco-engineering, setting a new standard for sustainability and environmental stewardship.

Artificial structures such as seawalls and rock armour have long served as crucial protective measures for ports, harbours, and marinas worldwide. However, conventional man-made structures often lack the biodiversity found in natural rocky shores, presenting challenges for marine ecosystems. Recognising this gap, UCD researchers partnered with Dublin Port Company to pioneer a solution that merges ecological principles with engineering expertise.

At the heart of this initiative lies the deployment of large habitat units along the Great South Wall, a strategic location chosen for its potential to foster marine life. The utilisation of a natural topography design sourced from a shoreline in Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork on habitat units of this size distinguishes these as a world-first in eco-engineering.

Eamon McElroy, Port Engineer at Dublin Port Company (second from right) with Caoimhe Morris (left), Dr. Paul Brooks (second from left) and Jennifer Coughlan (right) of the UCD School of Biology and Environmental ScienceEamon McElroy, Port Engineer at Dublin Port Company (second from right) with Caoimhe Morris (left), Dr. Paul Brooks (second from left) and Jennifer Coughlan (right) of the UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science

The design of these habitat units draws from a comprehensive study conducted as part of the Ecostructure project, in which Dublin Port played a pivotal role on the stakeholder steering committee. The study encompassed 32 natural rocky shores and 32 artificial shoreline sites across Ireland and Wales, evaluating both biological diversity and physical topography. Leveraging advanced techniques such as photogrammetry, the project team crafted 3D models to inform the development of engineering-standard habitat units and wall panels.

Crucially, these habitat units integrate natural topography into eco-friendly concrete, reducing carbon footprint while maximizing biodiversity potential. Collaborating with industry partners CubEX and MODULAR Cubed, the project exemplifies a synergy between academic research and practical application.

Over the next two years, UCD researchers will conduct comprehensive monitoring to assess the efficacy of these habitat units in enhancing marine biodiversity. By studying a diverse array of species, including invertebrates and fish, the project aims to unlock valuable insights into the benefits of large-scale eco-engineering approaches.

At nearly 5km long, the Great South Wall was the longest seawall in the world when it was completed in 1795 after construction began in the 1720s. Though that title has since been taken by a seawall in South Korea, the Great South Wall remains one of the longest in Europe.

Dr Paul Brooks, UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, commented: “This represents a significant step forward in our understanding of eco-engineering concepts. By incorporating natural topographies into artificial structures, we have the potential to mitigate environmental impacts while promoting ecological resilience along the Great South Wall.

Habitat units deployed at the Great South Wall as part of UCD’s Ecostructure project.   Habitat units deployed at the Great South Wall as part of UCD’s Ecostructure project.

“This project has been seven years in the making and Dublin Port Company have been with us every step of the way. The result you can now see along the Great South Wall is a world-first and we're very excited to see it finally come to the fore. It would not be possible without the collaboration with Dublin Port, and we hope that continues long into the future.”

Eamon McElroy, DPC Port Engineer, added: “Dublin Port is an extremely busy port, we have 8,000 ship arrivals every year, and as such, we must take great responsibility in looking after the environment around us. It is our policy to manage our obligations to the environment in a responsible manner and to take a sustainable approach to developing the port’s business.

“This project with UCD has been long in the making. The deployment of fish habitats along the Great South Wall, an iconic Dublin landmark, aims to enhance the biodiversity within the port estate itself. Through our joint efforts with UCD, we reaffirm our commitment to sustainable development and the preservation of marine ecosystems.”

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

An offshore patrol vessel with the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA) has berthed in Dublin to mark the 20th anniversary of the North Western Waters Advisory Council and the Pelagic Advisory Council.

The Ocean Protector is one of three EFCA offshore patrol vessels (OPVs), and participants at the 20th anniversary event in Dublin Castle have been invited to visit it today (Friday, March 15)

As Afloat has reported, the two advisory councils are discussing their role within the Common Fisheries Policy at the event.

The OPV Ocean Protector is one of the three inspection platforms chartered by the EFCA.

The 62-metre ship is a multi-role emergency response and rescue vessel and has a dynamic position system.

This system allows it to better maintain position, and to balance the environmental forces such as wind, waves and currents during the duty while also reducing fuel consumption to a minimum.

It is operational all year round as a fisheries patrol vessel to support member states in the different EFCA´s joint deployment plans.

The EFCA says that during its operations it is available for supporting other coast guard functions, such as providing support during search and rescue situations, maritime surveillance and pollution response.

“Its deployment enhances the EU capacity to improve the effectiveness of fisheries control operations in the EU and beyond,”the EFCA says.

Published in Dublin Port

Shorelines, a vibrant new exhibition chronicling the varied seascapes of Dublin, will come to The Substation at Dublin Port, courtesy of the Dublin Painting and Sketching Club (DPSC) and Dublin Port Company (DPC). The exhibition will contain brand-new works from some of Ireland’s most exciting and dynamic artists, who will bring an immediacy to the life of the sea across paintings, etchings and sculpture.

Shorelines runs from 8th-20th March at The Substation, Alexandra Road, Dublin Port. It is open to the public from 11am-4pm, Monday-Saturday, and admission is free of charge for all.

Artist Kathrine Geoghegan with her piece Bull Island Tangle, featuring in Shorelines, an exhibition at The Substation at Dublin Port chronicling the varied seascapes of Dublin Photo: Robbie ReynoldsArtist Kathrine Geoghegan with her piece Bull Island Tangle, featuring in Shorelines, an exhibition at The Substation at Dublin Port chronicling the varied seascapes of Dublin Photo: Robbie Reynolds

This exhibition marks the 150th anniversary of DPSC, a co-operative of artists which holds Nathaniel Hone, John Butler Yeats and Bram Stoker among its past members. Today, the club’s 80-strong membership includes some of the country’s most illustrious painters, sketch artists and print makers.

Among the rich catalogue of works is Kathrine Geoghegan’s Bull Island Tangle, which portrays seaweeds washed in on the tide at North Bull Island. Through vivid acryllics with oil glazes, this stunning work finds beauty in the familiar and puts a spotlight on the treasures of Dublin Bay.

Artist Dave West (left) with Kathrine Geoghegan and Aidan Hickey (far right) of the Dublin Painting and Sketching Club pictured with Declan McGonagle (second from right), curator of Dublin Port Company’s Engagement Programme at The Substation for Shorelines, an exhibition chronicling the varied seascapes of Dublin Photo: Robbie ReynoldsArtist Dave West (left) with Kathrine Geoghegan and Aidan Hickey (far right) of the Dublin Painting and Sketching Club pictured with Declan McGonagle (second from right), curator of Dublin Port Company’s Engagement Programme at The Substation for Shorelines, an exhibition chronicling the varied seascapes of Dublin Photo: Robbie Reynolds

Dave West’s richly textured High Tide, Balbriggan Harbour strikes visitors with its strong colours and refined representational approach. West’s eye for detail uncovers an interplay between light, shadow and reflection across a row of boats at berth in this captivating piece painted en plein air at Balbriggan Harbour.

The range of works on display reflect the varied perspectives and approaches the club has nurtured throughout its rich history.

History of the DPSC

The DPSC was founded by renowned maritime painters Dr William Booth Pearsall FRCSI and Alexander Williams RHA. An etching by Pearsall featured in the club’s 1880 exhibition is the first etching ever produced in Ireland as an original artwork. The work depicts a tall ship moored at Sir John Rogerson’s Quay.

In the late 19th century, members would take to the Iris, a shallow-draft yacht owned by member George Prescott, to sketch, paint and photograph along the Poolbeg Peninsula, in often perilous weather conditions.

Maritime Subjects Today

Shorelines, supported by Dublin Port Company, is a celebration of both the club’s history and also the vibrant culture of traditional art practice in Dublin today, with a focus on maritime subjects. The current exhibition follows on from a series of open-air painting sessions and exhibitions at Dublin Port, as part of DPC’s Port-City Integration programme.

Darragh Treacy, President of the Dublin Painting and Sketching Club, said: “It is an honour to celebrate the club’s 150th anniversary with Shorelines in The Substation at Dublin Port. Our members have put forward a great selection of works that show a range of perspectives on all things nautical. At a time when artists are increasingly squeezed out of the city, showcases of work like these are more vital than ever.”

Lar Joye, Port Heritage Director at Dublin Port Company, said: “The threshold between the city and the sea has always been a fascinating subject for painters and artists, and the Dublin Painting and Sketching Club has featured some of the original visual storytellers of Dublin’s life as a Port-City. In the year of the club’s 150th anniversary, it is really important for us to bring this selection of maritime-inspired works to The Substation, DPC’s new interpretive space which aims to open up the Port to the public.”

This is the latest item in a dynamic calendar of programming at The Substation, a venue for exhibitions, events, lecutres and performances. It follows the success of Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port, an exhibition on the subculture of the dockers curated by The Little Museum of Dublin.

The Substation is part of DPC’s Distributed Museum, which includes The Diving Bell on Sir John Rogerson’s Quay and The Pumphouse, a venue for artist residencies and workshops in Dublin Port’s Heritage Zone. The Distributed Museum route will be connected through 5.3km of dedicated cycleway and pedestrian walkways in the Port estate and the surrounding area. The Distributed Museum is part of DPC’s Port-City Integration programme to increase public access and celebrate Dublin’s Port-City heritage.

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

Irish dancing sensations ‘The Gardiner Brothers’ today launched the 17th annual Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk which will take place on St. Patrick’s Day, Sunday 17th March. An official event partner of St. Patrick’s Festival, the charity expects over 2,500 enthusiastic walkers to take on the 26km challenge, with the option of starting from Howth Harbour or Dun Laoghaire Harbour. Suitable for most fitness levels, the walk will take participants along the scenic Dublin Bay route with a ‘Halfway Hooley’ hosted at sponsor Dublin Port Company’s historic Pumphouse. Registration is now open at www.aware.ie/harbour2harbour at a cost of €25 per person.

The Gardiner Brothers, Michael and Matthew commented: “We are honoured to be a part of this year's Harbour2Harbour Walk with Aware. Mental health is such an extremely important thing to talk about in this day and age, and we want to encourage people to be conscious of their own mental health as well as those around them. We have always been big into sports and exercise, especially with our dancing, and we find that it contributes greatly not only to our physical health but also our mental health. We encourage everyone to take part in this incredible Harbour2Harbour Walk on St. Patrick's Day which will be a fantastic way to start everyone's day!”

The Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk is a flagship fundraising event for Aware, the national charity supporting people impacted by depression and bipolar disorder. This unique event will help raise vital funds to ensure the organisation can continue to deliver its free support, education and information services to individuals and communities nationwide.

Irish dancing sensations The Gardiner Brothers Michael and Matthew pictured at the launch of the 17th annual Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk which takes place on St. Patrick’s Day, Sunday 17th MarchIrish dancing sensations The Gardiner Brothers Michael and Matthew pictured at the launch of the 17th annual Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk which takes place on St. Patrick’s Day, Sunday 17th March Photo: Conor McCabe

This is the second year that the event has been included as part of St. Patrick’s Festival One City, One Festival Programme. Stephen Butterly, Head of Fundraising at Aware commented: “We are delighted to be included as an official event partner of St. Patrick’s Festival again this year. 2023 was the most successful Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk to date with over 2,500 people coming together to proudly demonstrate their support for mental health and raise money for Aware’s services. The Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk offers something a little bit different and it’s a great way to get family and friends together to celebrate our national holiday in a fun and healthy way. With the support of St. Patrick’s Festival, we are hopeful that we will see even more people taking part this year!”

Dublin Port Company has generously sponsored the event since 2014, hosting a ‘Halfway Hooley’ for participants midway along the route. Speaking about their involvement, Barry O’Connell, Chief Executive at Dublin Port Company commented: “We are proud to once again sponsor the Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk, an event that promotes both physical activity and mental health awareness. At Dublin Port Company, we recognise the importance of supporting initiatives that contribute to the wellbeing of our community. Hosting the 'Halfway Hooley' is our way of welcoming and encouraging participants as they embark on this significant journey along the Dublin Bay route.”

All participants will receive a t-shirt when they arrive for the event and are encouraged to wear these as they take part to raise awareness and show their support for mental health. People can also join the conversation online, using the hashtag #WeAreAware when sharing on social media.

Published in Dublin Port

Likening proposals for moving Dublin Port out of the capital to changes at other European ports is “misleading” and “not an apples-to-apples comparison”, argues Trinity urbanism professor Philip Lawton.

Writing in the Business Post, Prof Lawton notes how the “pet notion” of relocating the city’s port function, whether north via plans for Bremore Port or south to Arklow, to free up prime land for redevelopment ignores vital differences between Dublin and other European cities like Copenhagen and Oslo.

“Rarely has a port become fully detached from its original location, which is what’s being suggested for Dublin,” he says, detailing that when it has happened, it’s involved the expansion of existing port infrastructure — a vital aspect missing in Dublin’s case.

Ports, he adds, “do not exist in isolation. They are not vacant lots awaiting redevelopment, but part of a wider urban system. We may not feel it on a daily basis, but they are a fully integrated part of the city.”

The Business Post has more of Prof Lawton’s analysis HERE.

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

Dublin Port Company (DPC) has today announced that it has granted a new operating licence to CMA CGM Inland Services (CCIS), a subsidiary of CMA CGM Group, to begin operating at Dublin Inland Port. CCIS is one of the world’s largest providers of inland services with a container depot network in over 30 countries worldwide.

From this month, CCIS will become the second company to move its container operations to DPC’s North Dublin logistics hub, following an €8 million investment by DPC on a second phase of the development. It brings to €56m DPC’s total investment in Dublin Inland Port, all self-financed.

With their newly acquired licence, CCIS is now set to expand its portfolio, which already boasts over 23 dedicated empty container depots across Europe. Their state-of-the-art Dublin facility will specialise in container storage and repair, focusing on catering to the export needs of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and refrigerated products. Together with service partner Doyle Shipping Group (DSG), the investment will create 25 new jobs.

Headquartered in Marseille, France, the CMA CGM Group is a global player in sea, land, air and logistics solutions, with a workforce of over 155,000 employees worldwide. Operating a fleet of more than 620 ships calling in over 420 ports across a comprehensive global network, the group has been a significant player in the Irish market since 2006.

This is the second licence awarded at Dublin Inland Port at the North Dublin logistics hub after Dublin Ferryport Terminals (DFT) were granted permission by DPC to operate in October 2021.

Doyle Shipping Group is an Irish family-owned shipping business founded in 1882. They employ over 700 people throughout Ireland, handling over 13 million tons of cargo and providing port service solutions throughput all major ports in Ireland, as well as other services through their Logistics and Renewables divisions. Now steered by the third generation of the Doyle family and a committed board of directors, the Group aims to continue to invest in infrastructure and skills, with an emphasis on Health and Safety, and growth that is underpinned by long-term thinking.

The ongoing development of Dublin Inland Port continues DPC’s delivery of its Masterplan commitment to maximising the use of existing port lands by relocating port-related, but non-core activities – including empty container storage – away from Dublin Port.

Dublin Inland Port is located 14 kilometres from Dublin Port off the M2, with direct access to the M50 and to Dublin Port via the Dublin Port Tunnel and is part of Dublin Port’s world class route-to-market infrastructure.

Cormac Kennedy, Head of Commercial at Dublin Port, said: “In the past 12 months, we’ve invested a further €8million developing the next phase of Dublin Inland Port, which has created the opportunity for CCIS to relocate and grow its business in Ireland further. We are also delighted to see that this will create 25 new jobs. We are delighted to welcome CCIS and to support their business at the facility this December.

“As part of our Masterplan, we made a strategic decision to relocate non-core port users away from the Dublin Port estate. While this has freed up valuable space that is now being used for core activities, we are still running at close to capacity.

“By strategically relocating non-core users, we have successfully freed up 75% of our masterplan 40-hectare target, allowing Irish exporters and importers to benefit from the much-needed additional space within the Dublin Port footprint. Overall, since it opened in 2021, Dublin Inland Port has resulted in more efficient use of the Dublin Port Tunnel and Dublin Port’s internal network.”

A spokesperson for the CMA CGM Group said: “We are delighted It is a great opportunity to have been granted an operating license by Dublin Port Company for Dublin Inland Port. This marks the first expansion of CMA CGM Inland Services (CCIS) into Ireland and aligns seamlessly with our commitment to delivering top-tier logistics solutions.

“With our extensive portfolio, including over 23 dedicated container depots across Europe, this newly acquired license allows us to specialise in container storage and repair. At the state-of-the-art Dublin facility, CCIS will also specialise in the provision of refrigerated containers for frozen foodstuffs and high value pharmaceuticals which are exported worldwide from Ireland. Focused on catering to the export needs of key sectors such as foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, beverages and refrigerated products, we are eager to contribute to the growth and efficiency of Dublin Inland Port.”

Max Doyle, Director, Doyle Shipping Group Dublin, added: “This is an exciting development for the region. Doyle Shipping Group are pleased to be partners in this project, which should go some way to further easing the burden on quayside terminals as well offering a high-grade option to those looking to manage their empty equipment. DSG has operated in the region for many years and we are delighted to be able to further improve the options for our customers. In partnership with CCIS, we are confident that we can provide a service that will benefit from CCIS expertise in Inland depots and DSG’s operational experience and knowledge of the local market.”

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

Dublin Port Company (DPC) has today announced the outcome of the selection process that will see Terminal 5 in Dublin Port licensed to Stena Line and Seatruck Ferries. Stena Line will operate a new Dublin-Birkenhead (Liverpool) service while Seatruck Ferries and parent company CLDN will further develop their Dublin-UK services as part of this new shared freight terminal agreement.

In September 2023 DPC called for proposals from interested ferry lines to service west coast English or Welsh ports (excluding Dublin-Holyhead) out of Dublin following confirmation that P&O (which operated from Terminal 5 in Dublin Port) would exit the Dublin-Liverpool route by year end.

Stena Line’s new freight service between Dublin and Birkenhead (Liverpool) commences mid-February 2024, while Seatruck Ferries will move its Dublin-Heysham freight service within Dublin Port to Terminal 5 in January 2024.

DPC’s decision to award a shared licence to both Stena Line and Seatruck Ferries at Terminal 5 maximises the port’s existing infrastructure by pushing more truck and container freight through the terminal’s footprint. The move further supports DPC’s objective of adding capacity where possible, given the ongoing constraints on port lands, with Dublin Port already running close to capacity.

Barry O’Connell, CEO, Dublin Port Company, said: “It’s essential for Ireland’s economy that we have strong availability and competition on direct shipping routes between Dublin Port and the UK. We are pleased to welcome Stena Line’s new Dublin-Birkenhead route which brings choice to the market, and to continue working with Seatruck Ferries and CLDN on growing its Dublin-Heysham service.”

Stena Line’s new freight service

Stena Line’s new freight service will initially operate with one ship departing Dublin early in the morning and making the return journey from Birkenhead in the evening.

Stena Line already operates from Dublin Port to Holyhead and from Birkenhead to Belfast, and this new service will complement these existing routes. The company is currently assessing ship deployment options ahead of the mid-February start date in Dublin.

Paul Grant, Trade Director (Irish Sea), Stena Line, said: “We are very excited to re-establish this vital trade corridor with our new freight route between Dublin and Birkenhead which will further increase crossing options for our hauliers and their customers. With Stena Line now operating two routes out of both Dublin Port and Birkenhead, we are establishing key logistics hubs connecting freight flows across the Irish Sea and creating efficiencies for port users. We have invested significantly in our Birkenhead operations in recent years and as a result have seen growth on our Belfast to Liverpool service. We are confident that this new service will prove popular, offering more choice for our freight customers on both sides of the Irish Sea.”

Seatruck’s growing freight business

Seatruck Ferries and CLdN have been steadily expanding services into and out of Dublin in recent years. CLdN currently operates direct services from Rotterdam, Zeebrugge and Santander, while Seatruck Ferries operates the Heysham and Liverpool routes. As a result of the licence, Seatruck Ferries will move its Dublin-Heysham service to Terminal 5 in early 2024. All other CLdN services, including the Seatruck Ferries services to and from Liverpool, will continue to operate from Terminal 4. CLdN will also add a vessel to the Dublin-Liverpool route, providing extra sailings on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, bringing the total number of daily departures from three to four in each direction.

Alistair Eagles, Managing Director Seatruck Ferries, said: “We very much welcome this decision by Dublin Port. CLdN and Seatruck’s unaccompanied freight business on the Irish Sea has been growing steadily over recent years and more than 70% of all Irish Sea ferry freight now moves on an unaccompanied basis. The use of both Terminal 4 and Terminal 5 will enable us not only to further increase capacity but also to optimise the efficiency of our operations at the port. We look forward to growing our links with DPC as a stable and reliable partner and to further expanding our offer to customers.”

Published in Dublin Port

Dublin Port Company (DPC) is pleased to unveil a set of bicycle racks that have been recently installed at the Great South Wall to support the growing number of people who are accessing the popular location by bike.

This new facility - ideally located at the start of the Great South Wall - will allow up to 12 bikes to be securely parked before visitors begin their walk towards Poolbeg Lighthouse, one of the most distinctive landmarks in Dublin.

Over 300,000 people walk the Great South Wall annually, and many of these, including a growing number of tourists and locals, as well as swimmers at the Half Moon, are travelling there on two wheels ahead of their journey on foot.

At nearly 5km long, the Great South Wall was the longest seawall in the world when it was completed in 1731. Though a seawall in South Korea has since taken that title, the Great South Wall remains one of the longest in Europe.

These bicycle racks are the latest example of DPC working towards a more cycle-friendly port. In October, DPC received its final grant of planning permission to begin work on the Liffey-Tolka cycle lane. This project will create a new 1.4 km dedicated pedestrian and cycle route that will link the River Liffey with the Tolka Estuary through DPC lands.

Over 50 regular sea swimmers at Half Moon Swimming Club, many of whom cycle have struggled to find somewhere to lock our bikes at the start of the walkOver 50 regular sea swimmers at Half Moon Swimming Club, many of whom cycle have struggled to find somewhere to lock their bikes at the start of the walk Photo: Tommy Dickson

Eamon McElroy, Port Engineer at Dublin Port Company, said: “We are pleased to announce the installation of this brand-new set of bicycle racks at the Great South Wall. Dublin Port Company is committed to becoming a more cycle-friendly port and with projects such as our ambitious Liffey-Tolka cycle lane, we are well on the way towards our port-city integration. We get over 300,000 visitors to the Great South Wall annually and we hope that these new bicycle racks will attract even more walkers. DPC would like to thank Dublin Cycling Campaign for their input and advice on this project.”

Christmas at the Great South Wall! Left to right: Zane Blount-Ronan (13), Sabrina Moore of Half Moon Mad Yokes Swimming Groups and David Timoney of the Dublin Cycling Campaign take advantage of the new bike racks at the Great South Wall, which allow walkers a more sustainable point of access to one of the longest sea walls in EuropeChristmas at the Great South Wall! Left to right: Zane Blount-Ronan (13), Sabrina Moore of Half Moon Mad Yokes Swimming Groups and David Timoney of the Dublin Cycling Campaign take advantage of the new bike racks at the Great South Wall, which allow walkers a more sustainable point of access to one of the longest sea walls in Europe Photo: Tommy Dickson

David Timoney, Dublin Cycling Campaign, explained: “Good bicycle parking may be what persuades people to travel by bicycle rather than jumping in the car. We know that the fear of bike theft is a deterrent to more people cycling. We also know that good bike parking plus a high-quality lock stops most bike theft. The installation of these bike racks at the start of the Great South Wall, where there is a high degree of natural surveillance, is exactly what is needed to encourage more people to cycle instead of taking the car.”

Sabrina Moore, Half Moon ‘Mad Yokes’ Swimming Group, added: “We have over 50 regular sea swimmers at Half Moon, many of whom cycle, but up until now we have struggled to find somewhere to lock our bikes at the start of the walk. These bike racks are perfect for us and will encourage those who do drive to leave the car at home, which has the dual benefit of being the healthier choice and helping to reduce our carbon emissions.”

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

Dublin Port Company has proudly welcomed ‘Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port’, a compelling exhibition curated by The Little Museum of Dublin, to its Substation for a three-month stay.

The first-ever exhibition at the Substation, Dublin’s latest cultural hub, was launched by the Lord Mayor of Dublin Daithí de Róiste. The showcase - which includes never-before-seen photos - provides a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port.

‘Solidarity’ delves into the rich tapestry of Ireland’s industrial subculture, spotlighting the dockers’ narrative characterised by hardship, camaraderie, and unyielding resilience. From the challenges of casual labour to the advent of containerisation, the exhibition vividly illustrates the evolution of this dynamic community.

Guests take in history at Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port, a new exhibition from the Little Museum of Dublin and Dublin Port Company, free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm at The Substation, Dublin Port, until early February. Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin PortGuests take in history at Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port, a new exhibition from the Little Museum of Dublin and Dublin Port Company, free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm at The Substation, Dublin Port, until early February. Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port Photo: Tommy Dickson

Lord Mayor Daithí de Róiste commented on the significance of the exhibition, stating: “The dockers of Dublin Port have played a crucial role in shaping the city’s history. ‘Solidarity’ is a tribute to their enduring spirit and a reminder of the sacrifices made by those who toiled on the docks. This exhibition not only preserves their legacy but also invites us to reflect on the vibrant tapestry of Dublin's industrial heritage. I would like to congratulate Dublin Port Company and the Little Museum of Dublin for coming together to put on such a wonderful exhibition.”

Barry O’Connell, CEO of Dublin Port Company, remarked: “We are proud to support this insightful exhibition from the Little Museum of Dublin that brings to life the untold stories of the dockers. ‘Solidarity’ provides a unique perspective on the challenges and triumphs of this remarkable community, highlighting the crucial role they played in the development of Dublin Port. It is a testament to their resilience and the enduring legacy they have left behind.”

Historian in residence at the Little Museum of Dublin Daryl Hendley Rooney (left) with Dublin Port’s Marta López (centre) and the Little Museum’s Dara Flynn at the launch of Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port.Historian in residence at the Little Museum of Dublin Daryl Hendley Rooney (left) with Dublin Port’s Marta López (centre) and the Little Museum’s Dara Flynn at the launch of Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port Photo: Tommy Dickson

‘Solidarity’ invites visitors to explore the profound traditions rooted in family ties that defined the dockers’ lives. Many dockers followed in the footsteps of their families, embracing a life of physically demanding and unpredictable work. The exhibition meticulously examines various facets of the dockers’ lives, including docker’s reads, the button system of preferential hire, the tools of the trade, and the indispensable role of cranes. Additionally, the exhibition delves into the social aspects of a docker’s life, juxtaposed with the daily dangers faced on the docks.

Paddy Daly, retired docker, holding his docker’s shovel, currently on display at The Substation at Dublin Port as part of the Little Museum of Dublin’s exhibition Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port. The exhibition showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port. Solidarity is free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm until early February. No repro fee. Photo: Tommy DicksonPaddy Daly, retired docker, holding his docker’s shovel, currently on display at The Substation at Dublin Port as part of the Little Museum of Dublin’s exhibition Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port. The exhibition showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port. Solidarity is free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm until early February. No repro fee. Photo: Tommy Dickson

Free of charge for all, ‘Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port’ is open to the public at The Substation, Alexandra Road, Dublin Port, every Thursday-Sunday, 11:30 am-3:30 pm until early February.

Dr Rhona Mahony, Chair of the Little Museum of Dublin, added: “We were thrilled to work alongside Dublin Port Company to bring this engaging exhibition to the port. Dockers would have gathered in their hundreds next to the Substation every day seeking work on the docks, so there couldn’t be a more appropriate venue. A lot of time and hard work went into this exhibition, and I would like to pay tribute to the Dockers who shared their memories with our curation team, enabling them to create this exhibition.”

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science Simon Harris TD was at Dublin Port’s Substation today to mark the Dublin Construction Skills and Retrofitting Programme crossing 1,000 graduates.

The Port-based three-week course, which St Andrew’s Resource Centre runs in partnership with Inner City Renewal Group, is focused on helping the unemployed upskill quickly and find gainful employment in the construction industry.

Today saw ten people graduate, bringing the total number of graduates since the course was launched in 2017 to over 1,000.

Construction Skills Course by Numbers:

  • 1,003 people have graduated.
  • 60% of graduates start a job within the first month.
  • Female interest in the course is growing - 10% of graduates in 2023 were women.
  • 90% of candidates complete the three-week course.
  • 102 courses have been completed since 2017.

The intense course, for which all candidates are issued with a full set of workwear, prepares recent graduates with a diverse set of qualifications and experience for employment on construction sites. It consists of two main components: a Construction Skills Certification at Level 3 and a Retrofitting Assistant Certification.

Both components involve a placement process, and they work closely with each individual candidate to facilitate their entry into the construction industry. The primary objective of the programme is to have 60% of participants gain employment in the construction sector, with the majority of them securing jobs within four weeks of completing the course. Notable companies that have hired graduates include John Sisk & Son, Careys Building & Civil Engineering, Walls Construction, Alufix, and Clarke Concrete.

Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science Simon Harris TD said: “The Dublin Construction Skills and Retrofitting programme is a shining example of how innovative training initiatives can have a profound impact on individuals’ lives and the local community. With over 1,000 graduates, this course is not just about numbers, it's about creating opportunities, empowering people and driving economic growth. It’s heartening to see the construction industry embracing and benefitting from this skilled workforce. Congratulations to all involved in this remarkable achievement.”

Barry O’Connell, Chief Executive, Dublin Port Company, said: “Dublin Port Company are extremely proud to play host to the Construction Skills Course. The Port has long-standing ties with St Andrew’s and we are delighted to facilitate the great work they are doing for the local community and beyond. To pass 1,000 graduates is a phenomenal achievement and a lot of credit must go to all involved.”

The curriculum is tailored to individual needs and capabilities. The range of modules includes:

  • Induction
  • SOLAS Safe Pass
  • Manual Handling
  • Abrasive Wheels
  • MEWP (Scissors and Boom)
  • Working at Heights
  • QQI Level 3 Construction Skills
  • Introduction to Block Laying – 3 days (onsite)
  • Introduction to Plumbing and Plastering – 3 days (onsite)
  • Introduction to Carpentry and Decoration – 3 days (onsite)

The inception of the programme can be traced back to a collaborative effort involving the Department of Social Protection, St. Andrews Resource Centre and Dublin City Council. This initiative arose in response to the need for a local workforce to support the construction of the incinerator site in Ringsend in 2016 and the Strategic Development Zones in Dublin Docklands. St. Andrews Resource Centre devised a strategy to facilitate the recruitment of local workers in the east side of the inner city.

Minister for Further and Higher Education Simon Harris TD alongside Megan Pepper, graduate of the Dublin Port-based Construction Skills course, and Edel Currie (left), Community Engagement Manager at Dublin Port CompanyMinister for Further and Higher Education Simon Harris TD alongside Megan Pepper, graduate of the Dublin Port-based Construction Skills course, and Edel Currie (left), Community Engagement Manager at Dublin Port Company Photo: Conor Healy

Edel Currie, Community Engagement Manager, Dublin Port Company, said: “The course is truly a life-changing experience for some of the graduates. There are amazing stories of people, men and women, from the local community who have flourished in the construction industry off the back of this course. We have even seen some graduates working within the Port, so it gives us immense pride to see the difference it can make to people’s lives.”

Jim Hargis, Manager of the Education and Training Hub at St Andrew's Resource Centre, said: “We are immensely proud to reach 1,000 graduates at Dublin Port’s magnificent Substation today. The success of the project, and something that gives me great satisfaction, is that it is always evolving to ensure it meets employers’ needs. I would like to give a huge thanks to Dublin Port for giving us the platform to stage the course and supporting us.”

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under
Page 1 of 59

About the 29er Skiff Dinghy

The 29er is a one-design double-handed, single trapeze skiff for youth sailors.

There is an active class in Ireland, just one of the 38-countries from across all continents now racing the high-performance skiff.

The 29er is one of the latest dinghy classes to arrive in Ireland and has a 50/50 split between boys and girls.

The class like to describe the boat as "The most popular skiff for sailors who want to go fast!".

Derived from the Olympic class 49er class and designed by Julian Bethwaite the 29er was first produced in 1998.

Two sailors sail the 29er, one on trapeze.

The class is targeted at youth sailors aiming at sailing the larger 49er which is an Olympic class.


The 6.25-metre high rig features a fractional asymmetrical spinnaker; a self-tacking jib decreases the workload of the crew, making manoeuvres more efficient and freeing the crew to take the mainsheet upwind and on two-sail reaches.

The 15.00 m2 spinnaker rigging set-up challenges crews to be fit and coordinated, and manoeuvres in the boat require athleticism due to its lack of inherent stability and the high speed with which the fully battened mainsail and jib power up.

The 74kg weight hull is constructed of fibreglass-reinforced polyester in a foam sandwich layout.

The fully battened mainsail and jib are made from a transparent Mylar laminate with orange or red Dacron trimming, while the spinnaker is manufactured from ripstop Nylon.

The mast is in three parts - an aluminium bottom and middle section, with a polyester-fibreglass composite tip to increase mast bend and decrease both overall weights, and the capsizing moment a heavy mast tip can generate. Foils are aluminium or fibreglass.

About the ILCA/Laser Dinghy

The ILCA, formerly known as the Laser, is the most produced boat in the world, with 220,000 units built since 1971.

It's easy to see why the single-handed dinghy has won the title of the most widely distributed boat of all time.

The Laser is a one-design dinghy, the hulls being identical but three rigs that can be used according to the size and weight of the sailor.

The class is international, with sailors from 120 countries. The boat has also been an Olympic class since 1996, being both the men's and women's singlehanded dinghy.

Three rigs are recognised by the International Laser Class Association (ILCA):

  • ILCA 4: sail of 4.70m2
  • ILCA 6: sail of 5.76 m2
  • ILCA 7: sail of 7.06 m2

29er skiff technical specs

  • Hull weight 74kg (163lb)
  • LOA 4.45m (14.4ft)
  • Beam 1.77m (5ft 7in)
  • Crew 2 (single trapeze) 
  • Spinnaker area 15.00 m2 (181.2sq.ft)
  • Upwind sail area 12.5 m2 (142.0 sq.ft)
  • Mast length 6.25m (20.5ft)

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating