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Displaying items by tag: drowning

Irish Water Safety is asking people to keep away from the water's edge during the current violent storm force winds and high seas. Ireland averages 153 drownings every year and every year a number of tragedies occur as a result of people walking too close to the edge of coastal areas, cliffs, rivers and lakes during such stormy conditions.

Irish Water Safety is also asking those who own a small craft to make sure that it is well secured and when doing so, to wear a lifejacket at all times as there have been drownings during such activities in the past.

Motorists need to be particularly vigilant to avoid flooded areas on roads but particularly near rivers, because with poor light and short days it is not possible to determine the depth of floods easily.  Swift water will carry cars and other vehicles away and there have been very tragic drownings in the past as a result of such accidents.

Children are naturally curious about water, therefore parents should caution them that floodwater hides the true depth and that manhole covers may be open and that small streams when swollen are very fast and deeper than normal.

What should I do when I hear a Flood Warning?
·                Listen to the national and local radio for met eireann updates and AA Road watch updates
·                Check on neighbours particularly if they are elderly, infirmed or families with young children
·                Move your vehicles to higher ground
·                Move animal stock to higher ground
·                Check your small craft to ensure they are well secured or moored
·                Make sure you have warm clothes, food, drink, a torch and radio.
·                Block doorways and airbricks with sandbags or plastic bags filled with earth. Floodgate products will work effectively also.
·                Switch off gas and electricity supplies if flooding is imminent.
·                Check the time of High Water in the Newspaper.
·                Check out www.flooding.ie for more detail on General flooding

Personal Safety
·                Avoid flood waters at all times
·                carry a mobile phone at all times in case you need to call for help - call 112 or 999 in emergency
·                Wear suitable protective clothing & a lifejacket in on or around water
·                Do not enter fast flowing water.
·                Never put your feet down if swept away by fast flowing waters
·                Flooding on roads will be deeper at dips and around bridges.
·                Stay away from sea and flood defences.
·                when walking or driving, be aware of manhole covers and gratings that may have been moved due to the heavy flow of water.
·                Take care when using electric appliances in damp or flood conditions.
·                Remember that during the hours of darkness the dangers are multiplied.

After the flood
·                Avoid eating food that has been in contact with flood water.
·                Run water for a few minutes and wash your taps.
·                Check gas and electricity supply.
·                Leave wet electrical equipment alone to dry and have it checked prior to use.
·                Ventilate your property well.
·                Check on elderly neighbours.

Published in Water Safety
The crew of Howth RNLI rescued a woman from drowning off the coast of Portrane this week (Monday).

The Lifeboat crew had been out on exercise when they spotted the 31 year old female struggling above the waves. She had sunk two feet beneath the water when the crew reached her. They managed to catch her clothing and pull her aboard the All Weather Lifeboat (ALB), immediately administering first aid.

The RNLI crew then took the lady safely to Howth harbour, as she was thought to be too distressed to be lifted by the Coastguard helicopter which was also in attendance. An awaiting ambulance brought her to Beaumont Hospital to recover.

Howth RNLI voluntary crewmember Dave Howard says:

"All the crew were relieved that this rescue had a positive ending, the lady would certainly have died had we not already been at sea on exercise. She was very lucky"

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Safety News


Rescue News from RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Coast Guard News from Ireland


Water Safety News from Ireland

Marine Casualty Investigation Board News

Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 7 of 7

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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