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Royal Cork's Daniel Mallon on Top in First of ILCA/Laser Tri Series at Bantry Bay Sailing Club

10th August 2022

The first of the Cork Laser/ILCA Tri Series Sprints took place last Sunday at Bantry Bay Sailing Club in West Cork.

Race officer Deirdre Kingston delayed first gun by an hour to 12.55 pm to allow for a strong sea breeze to fill in before starting the first of five short sprints.

The format was an all-in start of 19 boats, both ILCA4 and 6 on a trapezoidal course in 12 to 14-knot winds with the backdrop of Bantry Bay.

The Tri Series Sprints sailors gather at Bantry Bay for a pre-race briefingThe Tri Series Sprints sailors gather at Bantry Bay for a pre-race briefing

The racing was very tight, with the ILCA 6s going down to the last race as the battle of the Daniels, where both Daniel O'Keeffe (Bantry) and Daniel Mallon (Royal Cork) were on two wins a piece. Daniel Mallon won the last race to finish first on the day, Daniel O Keeffe second and Joe O Sullivan (Royal Cork) third.

There were 12 to 14-knot winds on Bantry Bay for the first leg of the Tri-SeriesThere were 12 to 14-knot winds on Bantry Bay for the first leg of the Tri-Series

Isabel Mc Carthy was first in ILCA4, with Ethel Bateman second and Eve Mc Carthy third (All Royal Cork).

Bantry Bay Sailing Club pulled out all the stops to make everyone very welcome at the barbeque afterwards.

There were 12 to 14-knot winds on Bantry Bay for the first leg of the Tri-Series

As Afloat previously reported, the Tri-Series is open to all, with the next event being Sunday the 4th of September in Inniscarra Sailing and Kayaking Club.

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About the ILCA/Laser Dinghy

The ILCA, formerly known as the Laser, is the most produced boat in the world, with 220,000 units built since 1971.

It's easy to see why the single-handed dinghy has won the title of the most widely distributed boat of all time.

The Laser is a one-design dinghy, the hulls being identical but three rigs that can be used according to the size and weight of the sailor.

The class is international, with sailors from 120 countries. The boat has also been an Olympic class since 1996, being both the men's and women's singlehanded dinghy.

Three rigs are recognised by the International Laser Class Association (ILCA):

  • ILCA 4: sail of 4.70m2
  • ILCA 6: sail of 5.76 m2
  • ILCA 7: sail of 7.06 m2