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Displaying items by tag: RNLI

A record of the trust which was established to help bereaved families in the lifeboat disaster on Christmas Eve 1895 off Dun Laoghaire has been published digitally by Dun Laoghaire Rathdown (dlr) archive services.

The Kingstown Life-Boat Disaster Fund Letter Book has become the first item selected for the new digital series: Miscellany from the dlr Archive Collection.

All 15 crew on the lifeboat died after it capsized while trying to rescue the crew of the Finnish barque SS Palme which was sheltering from a storm in Dublin Bay. The event is commemorated every year on Christmas Eve.

The original book is now “extremely fragile”, the dlr Archive Services say, and making it available digitally brings it to a “much wider audience than is possible in a traditional archive while still preserving the original item”.

Councillor Denis O’Callaghan, Cathaoirleach, Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council; Harry Duggan, Harbour Master, Dún Laoghaire Harbour; Ed Totterdell, RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager; with RNLI crew members Nathan Burke, Andrew Sykes and James Traynor at rearCouncillor Denis O’Callaghan, Cathaoirleach, Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council; Harry Duggan, Harbour Master, Dún Laoghaire Harbour; Ed Totterdell, RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager; with RNLI crew members Nathan Burke, Andrew Sykes and James Traynor at rear

Dlr cathaoirleach Denis O'Callaghan said the archive collection is “important for the history of the county, and I welcome this first example of the council extending the reach of our historic records while ensuring the integrity and preservation of the originals”.

“ We are looking forward to adding to the new collection over time," he said.

The new publication is central to the history of lifeboats in Dún Laoghaire and this year is the 200th anniversary of the RNLI.

To mark this, O’Callaghan made a presentation to Eddie Totterdell, RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager.

Georgina Sweetnam, dlr Archives described it as “an exciting step forward for dlr Archive Services”.

Kingstown Life-Boat Disaster Trust Letter BookDescription - Following the Lifeboat disaster in Kingstown [now Dún Laoghaire] on Christmas Eve 1895, a financial Trust was established to dispense assistance to the families of the fifteen men who lost their lives. This book contains copies of correspondence from the Trust's secretary to the grant recipients, Trustees and other interested parties. It contains copy letters from 1897-1902. A Descriptive Guide accompanying the work is includedKingstown Life-Boat Disaster Trust Letter BookDescription - Following the Lifeboat disaster in Kingstown [now Dún Laoghaire] on Christmas Eve 1895, a financial Trust was established to dispense assistance to the families of the fifteen men who lost their lives. This book contains copies of correspondence from the Trust's secretary to the grant recipients, Trustees and other interested parties. It contains copy letters from 1897-1902. A Descriptive Guide accompanying the work is included

The collection has been deposited with the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI), a facility which provides long-term preservation, access, and discovery for Ireland’s social and cultural data.

DRI provides “stewardship of social and cultural data from a range of organisations including higher education institutions, cultural heritage institutions, Government agencies, local authorities, and community archives.

DRI Director Dr Lisa Griffith also welcomed the development.

She said “this moving collection, which sheds light on the assistance dispensed to the families of the fifteen men who lost their lives on Christmas eve 1895, highlights the profound bravery, experiences of loss and community responses to the shipping disaster”.

You can view the digital archive on the Kingstown Life-Boat Disaster Trust Letter Book – Digital Repository of Ireland (dri.ie) here.

Some of the crew and volunteers of Dún Laoghaire RNLI were acknowledged yesterday for their bravery and commitment in saving lives at sea. Organised by Dún Laoghaire Senator Barry Ward, twelve members of the Dún Laoghaire RNLI were presented with certificates of appreciation by An Taoiseach, Simon Harris TD, in Government Buildings, Dublin.

Remembering the dramatic rescue of a six-year-old girl at the back of the East Pier in Dún Laoghaire last month, Senator Ward welcomed the volunteers to Leinster House and Government Buildings, describing them as “everyday heroes who don’t look for acknowledgement but do deserve to be recognised for the incredible work they do protecting us all.”

Senator Ward said that “we are lucky to have the services of the lifeboat in Dún Laoghaire for over 200 years, even before the establishment of the RNLI, to keep everyone safe in Dublin Bay and beyond. The Dún Laoghaire RNLI commitment to saving lives at sea is present in all weathers, at every hour of the day and every day of the year. The recently publicised rescue of a 6-year-old girl at the back of the East Pier in Dún Laoghaire on 7 April is just one example of the courage and effectiveness of our lifeboat volunteers.”

Dún Laoghaire RNLI with An Taoiseach, Simon Harris TD and Senator Barry Ward in Government Buildings, DublinDún Laoghaire RNLI with An Taoiseach, Simon Harris TD and Senator Barry Ward in Government Buildings, Dublin

Presenting the volunteers with a certificate of appreciation, Taoiseach Simon Harris TD thanked Dún Laoghaire RNLI for the work they do every day, “saving people’s lives at sea and serving their community”, describing them as “the brave and committed men and women of Dún Laoghaire RNLI”.

Dún Laoghaire RNLI were presented with certificates of appreciation by An Taoiseach, Simon Harris TDDún Laoghaire RNLI were presented with certificates of appreciation by An Taoiseach, Simon Harris TD

It is the second honour for the Dun Laoghaire RNLI this month, with some of the crew travelling to London for a Buckingham Palace Garden Party celebrating 200 years of the Institution.

The members of Dún Laoghaire RNLI present in the Taoiseach’s office in Government Buildings were:

• Nathan Burke, ILB crew on 7 April 2024;
• Cira Doran, crew;
• Gary Hayes, Helm of the ILB on 7 April 2024;
• Laura Jackson, shore crew on 7 April 2024;
• Darina Loakman, Dún Laoghaire RNLI water safety leader;
• Mark McGibney Station Cox;
• Andrew Sykes, ILB crew on 7 April 2024, who entered the water during the rescue of a 6-years old girl;
• Ailbhe Smyth, ILB crew on 7 April 2024;
• Dara Totterdell, Dún Laoghaire RNLI Launch Authority and Training Coordinator;
• Ed Totterdell, Dún Laoghaire RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The 200th anniversary of the RNLI was celebrated in Portaferry on Sunday (26 May) with a cross-community service of thanksgiving held in St Patrick’s Community Centre.

The service hosted by Portaferry RNLI was greatly supported by both the local community and those who had travelled from further afield, and included contributions from religious representatives from Portaferry and the surrounding areas of Northern Ireland’s Ards Peninsula.

The audience was entertained by local sea shanty group the Selkies as well as a solo by Father Martin O’Hagan who was accompanied by Zara Quinn.

Speakers and dignitaries on the stage at St Patrick’s Community Centre to celebrate 200 years of the RNLI | Credit: RNLI/Lissa McCullySpeakers and dignitaries on the stage at St Patrick’s Community Centre to celebrate 200 years of the RNLI | Credit: RNLI/Lissa McCully

Among the attendees were the Lord Lieutenant of County Down, Gawn Rowan Hamilton; Mayor Jennifer Gilmour; Jim Shannon MP; Portaferry RNLI operations president John Murray; president of Portaferry RNLI’s fundraising branch Eveleigh Brownlow MBE; and Ards Peninsula Council members.

All at Portaferry RNLI said they wish to express their sincere gratitude to everyone who contributed to or joined them to mark such a important milestone in their charity’s history.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Time was - and it's not so very long ago - that if you wanted to see the nearest set of traffic lights and other road control paraphernalia to Crosshaven, then you'd have to go well into Cork City. Not so any more.

And the road on the immediate landward side of the of the Royal Cork Yacht Club's is one of Crosser's best fitted, with all the lights, bells and whistles of a classic Zebra crossing for wheeled and pedestrian traffic control.

So with the Bicentenary of the RNLI this year coming soon after the Tricentenary of the Royal Cork YC, and leading us on into the 55th anniversary of the final Beatles album, the yellow welly walkers of Crosshaven Lifeboat - who have been holding fund-raising walks every
Sunday morning in May - decided to mark the conclusion of their successful effort with a re-enactment by the core team of the famous Abbey Road image of The Beatles, but using the pedestrian crossing right outside the Royal Cork YC marina complex.

Abbey Road was first issued on 26th September 1969, and rumour has it that at least two of those in the photograph - excluding lifeboat mascot Stormy Stan of course - saved up their pocket money to buy copies of the album. Unlike London’s leafy Abbey Road in St John’s Wood, the village of Crosshaven has only this one Zebra crossing complete with old style Belisha Beacons at the RCYC which - conveniently - just happened to be the start point of the May Welly Walks. Next Sunday, the word is the RNLI crew look forward to “Golden Slumbers” in the “Octopus’s Garden” unless of course, their pagers go off. We're asked to convey apologies to the Fab Four.

Meanwhile, now it can be revealed: the perspiring hero fulfilling the Stormy Stan role in that heavy suit was Conor Barry.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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HM Coastguard requested the launch of Portaferry RNLI’s inshore lifeboat on Friday evening (24 May) to assist a 35ft yacht which was making slow progress after having suffered engine failure eight miles to the north-east of Strangford Bar in Northern Ireland.

As friends and family arrived at Portaferry Lifeboat Station shortly after 6pm to dedicate a bench to the memory of former crew member Billy Ellison, the lifeboat launched with helm Chris Adair and volunteer crew members Scott Blackwood, Oliver Rogers and Gary Meehan onboard.

Conditions at the time had a Force 3-4 southerly light breeze, slightly choppy wave conditions and good visibility.

Once on scene, both members of the stricken yacht’s crew and their dog were observed to be safe and well.

After an assessment of the situation, the yacht crew were happy and able to hoist their mainsail and make their own way to the safety of Ardglass Marina.

Portaferry’s lifeboat returned to station at 7.30pm and after washing and refuelling the boat, the crew enjoyed refreshments with the Ellison family and past Portaferry RNLI lifeboat crew members. Comments were made that perhaps Billy Ellison was watching on.

An hour later, the coastguard contacted Portaferry lifeboat operations manager, Heather Kennedy to report that the yacht was now 1.5 miles out of Ardglass but needed assistance to negotiate the entrance to the marina.

With no other vessel available to assist, the lifeboat crew readied themselves and launched immediately.

Once on scene, a tow was established ensuring the yacht could safely enter the marina where it was met by Newcastle Coastguard.

Kennedy said: “We commend the crew onboard the yacht for raising the alarm when their engine failed. This is always the correct thing to do and a situation can quickly change and greater risks may arise.”

The RNLI reminds all boat owners to check their vessel's engine to ensure they are ready for summer. Always check the weather and tides before venturing out. Always wear a lifejacket or suitable personal flotation device for your activity and always carry a means of calling for help. Should you get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Volunteers from Irish lifeboat stations including Dun Laoghaire, Arklow and Union Hall were among the 2,500 guests at a special garden party at Buckingham Palace last Thursday (23 May) to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI).

HRH The Princess Royal, accompanied by Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, and RNLI President HRH The Duke of Kent hosted the event that was attended by lifeboat crew, lifeguards, water safety volunteers and fundraisers from across Great Britain and Ireland, including recent recipients of meritorious service awards and The King’s Birthday and New Year Honours.

Representing Dun Laoghaire RNLI were helm Nathan Burke, station mechanic and coxswain Kieran ‘Colley’ O’Connell and helm Gary Hayes.

Representing Union Hall RNLI at Buckingham Palace last Thursday were volunteers Mary Rose Deasy and Mary Jacinta Casey, flanked by Martin Deasy and Sean Thompson | Credit: Mary Rose DeasyRepresenting Union Hall RNLI at Buckingham Palace last Thursday were volunteers Mary Rose Deasy and Mary Jacinta Casey, flanked by Martin Deasy and Sean Thompson | Credit: Mary Rose Deasy

Fundraising volunteers Mary Rose Deasy and Mary Jacinta Casey attended on behalf of Union Hall RNLI in West Cork, while Arklow RNLI was represented by John and Liz Bermingham, Jimmy and Majella Myler, Austin Gaffney and Helena Dennehy; and Trevor and Kelly Ann Conroy.

One of the highlights of the afternoon was a presentation by The Princess Royal of a Silver Medal for Gallantry to Penlee RNLI coxswain Patrick ‘Patch’ Harvey for his pivotal role in saving eight French sailors during a hurricane on 31 October 2022.

Head of volunteering at the RNLI, Donna McReath said: “I would like to thank each and every one of our incredible volunteers.

Among those attending the garden party from Ireland were John and Liz Bermingham, Jimmy and Majella Myler, Austin Gaffney and Helena Dennehy, and Trevor and Kelly Ann Conroy from Arklow RNLIAmong those attending the garden party from Ireland were John and Liz Bermingham, Jimmy and Majella Myler, Austin Gaffney and Helena Dennehy, and Trevor and Kelly Ann Conroy from Arklow RNLI

“We couldn’t do what we do without their vital support and the time and effort they generously dedicate in a wide variety of roles, from lifesaving crew to fundraisers and those who volunteer in our shops, museums or by sharing our water safety messaging.

“They are all lifesavers, and this special garden party is a wonderful opportunity to recognise and celebrate the joy and impact of volunteering for the RNLI. We are always looking for new volunteers to join our charity to help us continue saving lives at sea.”

Since the RNLI was founded on 4 March 1824, following an appeal to the nation from Sir William Hillary, the charity has saved more than 146,277 lives — this equates to an average of two lives saved every day for 200 years.

Today, the RNLI operates 238 lifeboat stations around Ireland and the UK, and has seasonal lifeguards on around 240 lifeguarded beaches around the UK.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Bundoran RNLI’s volunteers were called on Saturday morning (25 May) to assist in a water rescue off Mullaghmore in Co Sligo.

It was reported that a casualty had fallen from a boat and was struggling in the water. The alarm was raised by a passerby who heard calls for help and dialled 999.

The Bundoran RNLI lifeboat — helmed by Brian Gillespie with crew members Richard Gillespie, Oisin Cassidy and Fergal Mullen — launched within four minutes and headed to the scene some six miles away.

Fortunately, passers-by managed to help the casualty out of the water and onto land before the arrival of the emergency services.

The Bundoran RNLI shore crew arrived shortly thereafter, followed by the lifeboat team, who administered first aid to the casualty.

The Irish Coast Guard’s Sligo-based helicopter Rescue 118 was also dispatched to the scene but was stood down once the National Ambulance Service transported the casualty to hospital for further treatment.

Lifeboat helm Brian Gillespie said: “We wish the casualty a speedy recovery and thank our colleagues at Rescue 118 and the National Ambulance Service for their prompt assistance.”

Speaking following the call-out, Daimon Fergus, Bundoran RNLI lifeboat operations manager added: “If you get into difficulty in the water, it’s important to remember not to panic and to utilise the RNLI Float to Live campaign: tilt your head back and submerge your ears, relax and try to control your breathing, move your hands to help you stay afloat. It’s okay if your legs sink, everyone floats differently.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The Dunmore East RNLI Open Water Swim Charity Event will be held from Waterford Harbour Sailing Club on Sunday, June 2, with a predicted 350 sea swimmers expected for three swims of varying length - 1,600m, 800m, and 500m.

“This provides opportunities for individuals of all levels to brave the open water,” say the organisers. “Safety is the utmost priority, with a dedicated team of expert kayakers and safety boats on side to escort the swimmers throughout the event.”

Sponsored by EirGrid it is a key annual fixture supporting Dunmore East lifeboat. Margaret Barry, Chairperson of Dunmore East RNLI fundraising branch said, "Building upon the momentum of the previous year, the 2024 Dunmore East RNLI Open Water Swim promises to be an unforgettable experience, uniting swimmers of all levels in support of the important work carried out by the Dunmore East RNLI.

"EirGrid, our new event sponsor, has committed to a three-year sponsorship, enhancing the significance of this year's event and ensuring its continued impact and success"

More information about the Dunmore East RNLI Open Swim can be found here

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The weekly Sunday morning yellow-welly fund-raise walks that have been a feature of each May weekend in Crosshaven, going sociably along the easy Cork Harbour shore path to Drake's Pool and back to the lifeboat station for welcome sustenance, will conclude this Sunday (May 26th) with the walk beginning at 10.0am - the poster says it all.

ccrosshaven_lifeboat_poster

When started, it was hoped that May's usually springlike or just plain cold weather would keep things reasonably cool for the fully-foul-weather-clad lifeboat mascot Stormy Stan. But last Sunday morning's exceptionally bright sunlight was threatening to turn him into Sweatin' Stormy Stan, though he made it back to the comfort of the station nevertheless.

A cheery crowd with a purpose - last Sunday's Crosshaven Lifeboat walking groupA cheery crowd with a purpose - last Sunday's Crosshaven Lifeboat walking group

The walks have been attracting a diverse crowd, and if they haven't been simple chatting with each other, they'v been observing the diverse and seasonally-growing fleet of boats in the river. So can somebody please tell us if the handsome white sloop in the first photo includes an American-built boat that first arrived into Fenit on Tralee Bay many years ago, shippered Transatlantic by a seafaring priest?

The very worthy reason for it all - the Crosshaven lifeboat running as smoothly as envisaged by her designer, in action to seaward of Roche's PointThe very worthy reason for it all - the Crosshaven lifeboat running as smoothly as envisaged by her designer, in action to seaward of Roche's Point

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Carrybridge RNLI’s volunteers were called by Belfast Coastguard on Saturday afternoon (18 May) to assess a 6m vessel with one person on board which had run aground some two miles upstream from the lifeboat station on Upper Lough Erne in Northern Ireland.

Winds were southerly Force 3 with excellent visibility as the inshore lifeboat Douglas Euan & Kay Richards proceeded to the vessel’s last known location, and on arrival found it holding on its anchor.

The lifeboat crew assessed the wellbeing of the casualty on board and found them to be safe and well.

Upon assessing the casualty vessel, the volunteer crew found that it had lost all means of propulsion.

The helm deemed the safest option would be for the lifeboat and its crew to set up a tow, with the owner’s permission, and bring it back to the safest public jetty at Carrybridge, to avoid other craft going into the shallows to assist.

One crew member from the lifeboat was placed on board the casualty vessel to assist and the casualty vessel was swiftly towed to safety.

Speaking following the call-out, Stephen Scott, lifeboat operations manager at Carrybridge RNLI had advice for all boat users.

“Before setting out on your journey, please plan your route and carry out regular checks of their vessels position throughout your journey,” he said. “Have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble, have lifejackets for all on board and plan their journey using the relevant charts.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is: 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) is one of Europe's biggest yacht racing clubs. It has almost sixteen hundred elected members. It presents more than 100 perpetual trophies each season some dating back to 1884. It provides weekly racing for upwards of 360 yachts, ranging from ocean-going forty footers to small dinghies for juniors.

Undaunted by austerity and encircling gloom, Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC), supported by an institutional memory of one hundred and twenty-nine years of racing and having survived two world wars, a civil war and not to mention the nineteen-thirties depression, it continues to present its racing programme year after year as a cherished Dublin sporting institution.

The DBSC formula that, over the years, has worked very well for Dun Laoghaire sailors. As ever DBSC start racing at the end of April and finish at the end of September. The current commodore is Eddie Totterdell of the National Yacht Club.

The character of racing remains broadly the same in recent times, with starts and finishes at Club's two committee boats, one of them DBSC's new flagship, the Freebird. The latter will also service dinghy racing on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Having more in the way of creature comfort than the John T. Biggs, it has enabled the dinghy sub-committee to attract a regular team to manage its races, very much as happened in the case of MacLir and more recently with the Spirit of the Irish. The expectation is that this will raise the quality of dinghy race management, which, operating as it did on a class quota system, had tended to suffer from a lack of continuity.