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Displaying items by tag: Waterways Ireland

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Erne System in Northern Ireland that the Henry Street Jetties in Enniskillen will be closed this Friday 23 to Saturday 24 February.

This is to accommodate the annual Fishing Tackle and Bait angling open weekend taking place in the Co Fermanagh town, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of all craft on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that repair works will be taking place at Roscarban Bridge in Co Leitrim from Wednesday 14 February until mid-March.

During these works, a mechanical platform will be hung from the side of the bridge by mechanical plant, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

The navigable channel will remain open, but boaters are asked to comply with safety signage and heed all instructions from safety personnel who will be in the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the installation of lighting on the underside of Carrick-on-Shannon bridge arches will take place between Monday 19 and Friday 23 February, with works to take place between 10am to 3pm daily.

The contractor will be using a mobile under-bridge hoist vehicle. One lane of the bridge will be closed during these hours and a stop/go traffic management plan will be in place for traffic crossing the bridge.

Masters of vessels should proceed with additional caution during these works and comply with the instructions of onsite safety staff, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland is seeking planning permission for a five-year programme of maintenance works along the Barrow Navigation at townlands throughout counties Carlow, Laois and Kildare.

The proposed works will consist of essential maintenance and repair of the navigation assets and will include dredging, back-drain maintenance, and towpath and bank repairs.

Waterways Ireland says it seeks to improve the assets along the Barrow Navigation, which is a nationally important recreation and navigation corridor and also has a unique heritage and biodiversity value.

The Barrow Navigation features many bridges, locks and buildings that are protected structures and/or national monuments, and the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says its works will seek to protect these structures as well as the natural, cultural and amenity potential of the corridor to ensure the continued use and accessibility for all users.

Following validation, the planning documents will be publicly available on the three councils’ planning portals. Waterways Ireland encourages the public and interested parties to familiarise themselves with the documents and submit potential feedback to the councils.

Gerard Bayly, senior engineer on the Barrow with Waterways Ireland said: “The Barrow Navigation is a nationally important heritage corridor comprising a rich tapestry of natural, built and cultural assets.

“At Waterways Ireland, our goal is to ensure we can provide safe and sustainable experiences for all users of our waterways.

“We seek to maintain the heritage and biodiversity of Ireland’s waterways while providing a high-quality navigation and recreation offering, for the benefit of all.”

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the lifting bridges at Tarmonbarry and Rooskey in Co Roscommon will be closed on Thursday 8 and Friday 9 February to facilitate structural inspections.

In an update on Friday, Waterways added that while Rooskey lifting bridge will reopen on Saturday 10 February, the bridge at Tarmonbarry will remain closed until next Friday 16 February to facilitate maintenance works.

Update 16/2: Waterways Ireland wishes to notify masters of vessels and users Tarmonbarry Bridge will remain closed until Friday 8 March to facilitate essential maintenance works. A diversion route is available via the Camlin River.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and users of the Lower Bann navigation in Northern Ireland that due to the installation of new lock gates at Movanagher Lock, the lock will be closed for a period of around five weeks as of Tuesday 6 February.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the westernmost section of the public jetty access at the Boyle Harbour public amenity in Boyle, Co Roscommon will be closed from Monday 5 to Friday 23 February to facilitate planned maintenance works to the harbour.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has been accused of attempting to gentrify Grand Canal Dock with plans to hike annual fees for houseboat dwellers by nearly 700 per cent.

Residents among the 30 vessels at the Dublin city centre mooring told The Journal that they have no objection in principle to an increase in the annual mooring fees, which include access to electricity, water and refuse collection.

But they argue that the sharp rise from €578 annually to €4,000, rising to €7,500 over six years, is “not affordable or realistic”.

In response, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says the proposed rise in charges is in line with the “superior” facilities at Grand Canal Dock — adding that any houseboat owners unwilling to pay would be “facilitated at an alternative location”.

The Journal has more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that it will be carrying out maintenance works on the waiting jetty on the upstream side of the 35th Lock in Shannon Harbour.

Works will begin on Monday 29 January and will last for four weeks, from 9am to 5pm each day. The jetty will be closed during this time, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels on the Grand Canal that the Barrow Line from Lock 24 (McCartney’s) to Lock 25 (Moores) will reopen to navigation on Thursday 28 March following essential quay wall refurbishment at Bell Harbour in Monasterevin.

Localised quay wall restrictions will remain within Bell Harbour to facilitate ongoing paving and landscaping works, and vessels navigating within the harbour are asked to proceed with caution, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways
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The home club of Laser Radial Olympic Silver medalist Annalise Murphy, the National Yacht Club is a lot more besides. It is also the spiritual home of the offshore sailing body ISORA, the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race and the biggest Flying Fifteen fleet in Ireland. Founded on a loyal membership, the National Yacht Club at the East Pier in Dun Laoghaire on Dublin Bay enjoys a family ethos and a strong fellowship in a relaxed atmosphere of support and friendship through sailing.

Bathing in the gentle waterfront ambience of Dun Laoghaire on the edge of South County Dublin, the National Yacht Club has graced the waters of the Irish Sea and far beyond for more than a century and in 2020 celebrates its sesquicentennial.  

The club is particularly active in dinghy and keelboat one-design racing and has hosted three World Championships in recent years including the Flying Fifteen Worlds in 2003, 2019 and the SB3 Worlds in 2008. The ISAF Youth Worlds was co-hosted with our neighbouring club the Royal St. George Yacht Club in 2012...

National Yacht Club Facilities

Facilities include a slipway directly accessing Dun Laoghaire Harbour, over eighty club moorings, platform parking, pontoons, fuelling, watering and crane-lifting ensure that the NYC is excellently equipped to cater for all the needs of the contemporary sailor. Berths with diesel, water, power and overnight facilities are available to cruising yachtsmen with shopping facilities being a short walk away. The club is active throughout the year with full dining and bar facilities and winter activities include bridge, snooker, quiz nights, wine tasting and special events.

National Yacht Club History

Although there are references to an active “club” prior to 1870, history records that the present clubhouse was erected in 1870 at a cost of £4,000 to a design by William Sterling and the Kingstown Royal Harbour Boat Club was registered with Lloyds in the same year. By 1872 the name had been changed to the Kingston Harbour Boat Club and this change was registered at Lloyds.

In 1881. the premises were purchased by a Captain Peacocke and others who formed a proprietary club called the Kingstown Harbour Yacht Club again registered at Lloyds. Some six years later in 1877 the building again changed hands being bought by a Mr Charles Barrington. and between 1877 and 1901 the club was very active and operated for a while as the “Absolute Club” although this change of name was never registered.

In 1901, the lease was purchased by three trustees who registered it as the Edward Yacht Club. In 1930 at a time when the Edward Yacht Club was relatively inactive, a committee including The Earl of Granard approached the trustees with a proposition to form the National Yacht Club. The Earl of Granard had been Commodore of the North Shannon Y.C. and was a senator in the W.T.Cosgrave government. An agreement was reached, the National Yacht Club was registered at Lloyds. The club burgee was created, red cross of Saint George with blue and white quarters being sky cloud, sea and surf. The Earl of Granard became the first Commodore.

In July of 1950, a warrant was issued to the National Yacht Club by the Government under the Merchant Shipping Act authorising members to hoist a club ensign in lieu of the National Flag. The new ensign to include a representation of the harp. This privilege is unique and specific to members of the National Yacht Club. Sterling’s design for the exterior of the club was a hybrid French Chateau and eighteenth century Garden Pavilion and today as a Class A restricted building it continues to provide elegant dining and bar facilities.

An early drawing of the building shows viewing balconies on the roof and the waterfront façade. Subsequent additions of platforms and a new slip to the seaward side and most recently the construction of new changing rooms, offices and boathouse provide state of the art facilities, capable of coping with major international and world championship events. The club provides a wide range of sailing facilities, from Junior training to family cruising, dinghy sailing to offshore racing and caters for most major classes of dinghies, one design keelboats, sports boats and cruiser racers. It provides training facilities within the ISA Youth Sailing Scheme and National Power Boat Schemes.

Past Commodores

1931 – 42 Earl of Granard 1942 – 45 T.J. Hamilton 1945 – 47 P.M. Purcell 1947 – 50 J.J. O’Leary 1950 – 55 A.A. Murphy 1955 – 60 J.J. O’Leary 1960 – 64 F. Lemass 1964 – 69 J.C. McConnell 1969 – 72 P.J. Johnston 1972 – 74 L. Boyd 1974 – 76 F.C. Winkelmann 1976 – 79 P.A. Browne 1979 – 83 W.A. Maguire 1983 – 87 F.J. Cooney 1987 – 88 J.J. Byrne 1988 – 91 M.F. Muldoon 1991 – 94 B.D. Barry 1994 – 97 M.P.B. Horgan 1997 – 00 B. MacNeaney 2000 – 02 I.E. Kiernan 2002 – 05 C.N.I. Moore 2005 – 08 C.J. Murphy 2008 – 11 P.D. Ryan 2011 – P. Barrington 2011-2014 Larry Power 2014-2017 Ronan Beirne 2017 – 2019