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Bourbon is Not just a Biscuit!...but Clearly is a X-Bow Ship

6th May 2013
xbow ship
Bourbon Clear is painted with a distinctive green hull and also features an unconventional bow Photo: Bob Bateman
Bourbon is Not just a Biscuit!...but Clearly is a X-Bow Ship

#CorkHarbour – The increasing strategic importance of Cork Harbour as a base for the oil and gas energy sector in the search for natural resources particularly off our southern shores, is evident with this recent view taken by our colleagues of the platform supply vessel (PSV) Bourbon Clear passing Cobh, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Not only is Bourbon Clear painted with a distinctive green hull but also features an unconventional bow which is of the X-BOW design, a unique and environmentally-friendly hull line design that is patented by her Norwegian developers Ulstein.

The odd looking X-Bow has an inverted bow design which was first introduced in 2005 with the Bourbon Orca, her introduction caused quite a splash in the offshore maritime world and beyond.

Since then, more 60 vessels of various designs have been completed with the specialist bow form which claims to improve handling in rough seas and in reduced levels of fuel consumption.

The 4,000 tonnes newbuild has further Nordic connections as the owners are Bourbon Offshore Norway. The company have a fleet of vessels that utilizise in the very latest design and technology so to provide supplies to oil and oil-related companies all over the world.

Bourbon clear x Bow Cork Harbour

Bourbon Clear passes Port Control at 'The Holy Ground' area of Cork Harbour. Photo: Bob Bateman

Currently Bourbon have newbuilds under construction and they are of the Ulstein PX105 PSV design in which the 80m Bourbon Clear belongs to this series having been launched last year from a Chinese shipyard.

Bourbon Clear has called previously to Cobh Cruise Terminal and in the background of the (TOP) photo, is yet another Norwegian flagged vessel, Hurtigruten's Fram, the polar expedition cruiseship which visited Dublin Port yesterday.

 

Published in Cork Harbour
Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

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Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

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Cork Harbour Information

It’s one of the largest natural harbours in the world – and those living near Cork Harbour insist that it’s also one of the most interesting.

This was the last port of call for the most famous liner in history, the Titanic, but it has been transformed into a centre for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

The harbour has been a working port and a strategic defensive hub for centuries, and it has been one of Ireland's major employment hubs since the early 1900s. Traditional heavy industries have waned since the late 20th century, with the likes of the closure of Irish Steel in Haulbowline and shipbuilding at Verolme. It still has major and strategic significance in energy generation, shipping and refining.

Giraffe wander along its shores, from which tens of thousands of men and women left Ireland, most of them never to return. The harbour is home to the oldest yacht club in the world, and to the Irish Navy. 

This deep waterway has also become a vital cog in the Irish economy.

‘Afloat.ie's Cork Harbour page’ is not a history page, nor is it a news focus. It’s simply an exploration of this famous waterway, its colour and its characters.

Cork Harbour Festival

Ocean to City – An Rás Mór and Cork Harbour Open Day formerly existed as two popular one-day events located at different points on Cork’s annual maritime calendar. Both event committees recognised the synergy between the two events and began to work together and share resources. In 2015, Cork Harbour Festival was launched. The festival was shaped on the open day principle, with Ocean to City – An Ras Mór as the flagship event.

Now in its sixth year, the festival has grown from strength to strength. Although the physical 2020 festival was cancelled due to Covid-19, the event normally features nine festival days starting on the first week of June. It is packed full of events; all made possible through collaboration with over 50 different event partners in Cork City, as well as 15 towns and villages along Cork Harbour. The programme grows year by year and highlights Ireland’s rich maritime heritage and culture as well as water and shore-based activities, with Ocean to City – An Rás Mór at the heart of the festival.

Taking place at the centre of Ireland’s maritime paradise, and at the gateway to Ireland’s Ancient East and the Wild Atlantic Way, Cork is perfectly positioned to deliver the largest and most engaging harbour festival in Ireland.

The Cork Harbour Festival Committee includes representatives from Cork City Council, Cork County Council, Port of Cork, UCC MaREI, RCYC, Cobh & Harbour Chamber and Meitheal Mara.

Cork Harbour Festival & Ocean to City Race

Following the cancellation of the 2020 event, Cork Harbour Festival will now take place 5 – 13 June 2021, with the Flagship Ocean to City on 5 June

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