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New Yacht Sees 'Sailing in Dublin' Club on Crest of a Wave

12th April 2015
Sailing_In_Dublin_Silver_Wind
Silver Wind, a 35ft Jeanneau Sun Odyssey boat, was purchased thanks to the assistance of a grant from the Government's Sports Capital scheme
New Yacht Sees 'Sailing in Dublin' Club on Crest of a Wave

#sid – Sailing in Dublin Club (SID Club) has just acquired an additional cruising boat to add to its growing fleet writes Jessica O'Donnell. Silver Wind, a 35ft Sun Odyssey boat, was purchased thanks to the assistance of a grant from the Government's Sports Capital scheme with the balance paid from Club funds. SID put together dedicated grant and boat acquisition sub-committees drawn from club members and they put much hard work into securing this important new acquisition. The new boat, which was purchased with the aim of increasing participation in sailing, has been enthusiastically welcomed by SID's growing club membership.

Since its foundation thirty years ago, Sailing in Dublin Club has gone from strength to strength and its current fleet includes Laser Vagos; Ruff Diamond, a Ruffian 23; Obsession, a Sigma 33 boat, and now an additional cruising boat, Silver Wind. As a sailing collective, SID offers wonderful opportunities for racing and cruising without someone having to own their own boat. Its volunteer ethos means that there is also a pool of members to also draw upon to help with, and therefore offering more opportunities to learn more about, boat maintenance.

SID regularly participates in the DBSC series of races throughout the year, races in the challenging Irish Offshore ISORA races as well as Regattas in Dun Laoghaire and elsewhere close to Dublin. The Club's cruising ambitions have grown impressively and in 2015 SID has an exciting cruising programme which will see members sail in cruises along the east, south and west coast of Ireland stopping off in the likes of Dunmore East, Crosshaven, Baltimore, Dingle and Galway along the way. There are also plenty of shorter cruises and days sails closer to home against the backdrop of stunning Dublin Bay. With the new boat, there is now even more comfort and enhanced features for members when cruising. This cruising aspect is only one part of a vibrant club that also has an active dinghy section so there is certainly something for everyone!

While not a sailing school, there is a strong emphasis in SID on encouraging members to up-skill through their participation in recognised sail training provided by sailing schools around Ireland and abroad. A volunteer Training Officer and training sub-committee regularly update members on the availability of approved sail training courses whether related to VHF, First Aid, Sea Survival skills, operating a powerboat or other relative subjects. Club members, too, are happy to share their skills with others on different rungs of the sailing ladder and such co-operation and opportunities for sailing development from competent crew to skippering is one of the Club's most attractive features.

As a small and friendly club, there are opportunities for socializing after sails and throughout the year at Club dinners, BBQs and other events. With two female Commodores in succession the Club is also leading the way in promoting 'women on the water'. SID's excellent value – the annual membership subscription is only €370 – and variety and extent of sailing opportunities has seen the Club's membership grow impressively year on year. New members are always welcome and for anyone who would like to avail of a Guest Sail with SID, they can do so by going to the Club's website www.sailingindublin.ie The cost of a Guest Sail is only €40 and is redeemable against full membership subscription should a person wish to join the Club. With the bright evenings and summer approaching it is definitely time to get out sailing! To find out more about SID and what it has to offer click www.sailingindublin.ie 

Published in Dublin Bay
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

 

At A Glance – Dublin Bay

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south

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