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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) has recently announced the introduction of a new non-spinnaker rating for CR4 and CR5 to promote white sails racing in Dublin Bay.

The move comes following the success of the VPRS rating system in the Sports Boats Class, which has been expanded to other classes. With a certificate costing only €25 and no need to get a boat measured, it means that those who do not need IRC ratings can get certified at a much lower cost.

Commodore Ed Totterdell explained, "For the 2024 season, boats currently competing in CR4 and CR5 will be able to compete in a new VPRS Division. This will promote non-spinnaker racing in DBSC by opening another area of competition and fun for all."

DBSC Commodore Ed Totterdell has launched a special Under 30s discount for Dublin Bay racingDBSC Commodore Ed Totterdell Photo: Michael Chester

Class Captain Catherine Day welcomed the initiative, saying, "I am delighted by the overwhelmingly positive response to trialling the new VPRS rating system for the 2024 season.

This initiative promises to offer a fair opportunity for all our class members, ensuring that boat characteristics, rather than crew performance, are the primary focus in DBSC racing. We will continue to support Echo throughout the class too."

Applying for a VPRS Certificate couldn’t be easier, say the organisers, and DBSC has put a link on their membership form for those who need to obtain one.

Any DBSC Cr4 or CR5 member who needs more information is welcome to contact DBSC by emailing [email protected].

The move is expected to promote non-spinnaker racing in Dublin Bay, offering a fair opportunity for all class members.

The new rating system will ensure that boat characteristics, rather than crew performance, are the primary focus in DBSC racing.

The initiative is expected to be welcomed by racing enthusiasts and could lead to more participants joining the races in the future.

Published in DBSC

Strong easterly winds and big seas may have prevented the final race of the AIB-sponsored DBSC Spring Chicken Series from sailing on Sunday morning (March 10) – the first cancellation of the six-race mixed cruiser and one design league – but there was still plenty of fun ashore at a well-attended National Yacht Club-hosted prizegiving at Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

AIB DBSC Spring Chicken Champions 2024 - The crew of the J80 Jambon collect their prizes at the National Yacht Club on Sunday, March 10thAIB DBSC Spring Chicken Champions 2024 - The crew of the J80 Jambon collect their prizes at the National Yacht Club on Sunday, March 10th

As regular Afloat readers know, sportsboats occupied the podium places after the penultimate race with fourth-placed J80 Jambon moving to the front of the mixed cruisers handicap fleet (the second time she has topped the scoreboard in this six race series) after her seventh-placed finish last Sunday.

After five races sailed and one discard, the 1720 No Show is second by two points on 36 with the one-time leader, another 1720 sportsboat, Long Island Legend in third.

Results are downloadable here.

Published in DBSC
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A new overall leader goes into this Sunday's final race of the AIB DBSC Spring Chicken Series on Dublin Bay as sportsboats occupy the podium places.

The fourth-placed J80 Jambon has moved to the front of the mixed cruisers handicap fleet (the second time she has topped the scoreboard in this six race series) after her seventh placed finish last Sunday.

After five races sailed and one discard, the 1720 No Show is second by two points on 36 with one-time leader, another 1720 sportsboat, Long Island Legend in third.

Download the latest results below as a PDF file

Published in DBSC

After four races sailed in the AIB DBSC Spring Chicken Series on Dublin Bay, the 1720 sportsboat Long Island Legend replaces the J80 Jambon at the top of the scoresheet.

With two races to go in the series, only ten points separate the top ten boats overall after organisers applied a discard. 

The third race of the six-race series saw sunny conditions accompanied by a good breeze, providing an ideal setting for the competitors. The 40-boat fleet was safely home before gale-force winds swept the bay on Sunday afternoon.

Overall, Long Island Legend leads by a point from the J109 Joker II on 27. In third place is another J80, Derry Girls on 30 points, with one-time leader Jambon dropping to fourth overall on 31.

Download the latest results below as a PDF file

 

Published in DBSC

A third race win last Sunday means the J80 'Jambon' moves into the  AIB DBSC Spring Chicken Series lead on Dublin Bay.

The Dun Laoghaire Harbour sportsboat crew are five points ahead of second-placed Just Jasmin, a Bavaria Match 35, on 32 points.

Derry Girls, another J80 entrant, lies third on 38 points in the 40-boat fleet.

The fleet sailed in moderate westerly winds for its third race. 

From February 4 to March 10 (first gun 10:10), six races will be run using a progressive handicap on a case-by-case basis.

Racing continues in the National Yacht Club hosted series this Sunday at 10.10 am off Dun Laoghaire.

Download the results below as a pdf file.

Published in DBSC

The AIB DBSC Spring Chicken Series fleet is expecting moderate westerly winds for their third race this Sunday on Dublin Bay.

ECHO Handicaps and start times for the 40 boat have been published and are downloadable below

As Afloat reported earlier, the racing came to an exciting conclusion last Sunday as 'No Show', the 1720 sportsboat, clinched the top spot. The second race of the six-race series saw sunny conditions accompanied by a good breeze, providing an ideal setting for the competitors.

The third race starts at 10.10 am off Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

 

 

Published in DBSC

The AIB DBSC Spring Chicken Series on Dublin Bay came to an exciting conclusion last Sunday as 'No Show', the 1720 sportsboat, clinched the top spot. The second race of the six-race series saw sunny conditions accompanied by a good breeze, providing an ideal setting for the competitors.

However, the day didn't go without incident. During the race, the crew of J109 'Joker' had to deal with a man overboard situation. Fortunately, their practised procedures paid off, and the crew quickly recovered with no damage, albeit a bit wet, according to organisers.

The final results for the second race of the series are available for downloadable below, and organisers have announced that the Katanca result will be corrected to 'retired' in the overalls next week, ensuring fairness and accuracy in the final standings.

 

Published in DBSC

Multiple championship-winning J109 Joker II of the Royal Irish Yacht Club won the first race of the DBSC Spring Chicken Series on Sunday.

The results are downloadable below.

As Afloat reported previously, strong westerly winds reduced the fleet to 17 boats as winds gusted to over 20 knots on Dublin Bay. 

Second was the recent winner of the 2023 Turkey Shoot Series, the 1720 Optique with third place, on modified ECHO handicap, going to the quarter tonner Snoopy from Courtown Sailing Club in County Wexford.

Racing in the six races series hosted by the National Yacht Club continues next Sunday.

Published in DBSC
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Between the delivery of its new committee boat and the strong entries received so far, it looks like a great season ahead for Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC).

DBSC Commodore Ed Totterdell visited builder Gerry Smyth Boats on St. Brigid's holiday weekend and was delighted with the progress. “We have a firm delivery date of March, and she will be on station for the first race of the season,” he told Afloat.

With a bumper edition of the pre-Christmas Turkey shoot successfully concluded and with racing already underway in the Spring Chicken Warm-Up Series, DBSC 2024 summer racing begins in AprilWith a bumper edition of the pre-Christmas Turkey shoot successfully concluded and with racing already underway in the Spring Chicken Warm-Up Series, DBSC 2024 summer racing begins in April

DBSC has received entries for each of its racing classes, with, for example, over half of the B211 class having entered so far. "With a very busy season on the bay, including the club regattas, J Cup, J109 Europeans, ICRAs and IRC European Championships, we have a lot of work to do to make sure we provide all our members a season to remember and receive these entries helps with that planning", Totterdell said. 

Ruffian 23s will now start with the DBSC Red Fleet for Saturday Summer Series racing on Dublin Bay Photo: AfloatRuffian 23s will now start with the DBSC Red Fleet for Saturday Summer Series racing on Dublin Bay Photo: Afloat

"We intend to contact the Class Captains of CR0, 1 and 2 shortly and ask that they poll their members who have entered as to whether they would like to start their race (Starred races do not count towards season points) for the Saturday of the ICRAs," he says.

"It is important, therefore, that everyone has a voice, and we urge members to put their entries in as soon as possible, he notes.

Some classes have also approached DBSC to change their racing schedule, such as the Ruffians now starting with the Red Fleet on Saturdays and the FF15s changing their position in the start sequence, putting them as second start to the SB20s.

Between making these changes, designing some new regatta-type courses, commissioning and launching the new committee boat and working with the clubs to ensure DBSC can run racing while they run championships, it is shaping up to be a busy and exciting 2024 season.

Published in DBSC

A fleet of up to 25 brave DBSC 'Spring Chicken' entrants braved strong westerly winds for the first race of the six-race series on Sunday (February 4).

The blustery 25-knot westerly winds presented quite the challenge for the first race of the 2024 season on Dublin Bay.

The series for mixed cruisers and one designs runs until March 10 (first gun 10:10), using a progressive handicap on a case-by-case basis in the AIB-sponsored event.

Sunday's fleet included a number of championship-winning cruisers, including multiple J109 champion Joker II With sailmakers Maurice O'Connell and Mark Mansfield onboard) from the Royal Irish Yacht Club and Wexford Quarter Tonner Snoopy, the 2021 ICRA Class Three National Champion.

Crew of the J109 Joker II enjoy the strong wind conditions for the first race of the 2024 DBSC 'Spring Chicken' Series on Dublin BayCrew of the J109 Joker II enjoy the strong wind conditions for the first race of the 2024 DBSC 'Spring Chicken' Series on Dublin Bay Photo: Maurice O'Connell

One-designs, cruisers, and other boats that don't often compete in races are all "quite welcome," according to DBSC.

The 2023 Series attracted a fleet of nearly fifty boats, and organisers are expecting a similar fleet as the series progresses.

Race one results are being calculated.

Published in DBSC
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020