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Dublin Harbours Feel the Brunt of Storm Emma

2nd March 2018
The scene at Bulloch Harbour where a storm surge caused waves to break over the harbour. Scroll down for video. The scene at Bulloch Harbour where a storm surge caused waves to break over the harbour. Scroll down for video.

Flooding in South Dublin coastal towns and villages came when high tides arrived at lunch time today.

In Bulloch Harbour in Dalkey, on the southern tip of Dublin Bay, storm waves swept through the harbour as Bay waters threatened the top of the quay.

At nearby Coliemore Harbour a boat was capsized in the small harbour in Dalkey Sound

Coliemore harbourColiemore harbour Photo: Michael Chester

At Dun Laoghaire Harbour, boats are snug in the country's biggest marina but there is reported damage to pontoons and boats moored elsewhere.

At Seapoint, in Monkstown, County Dublin the shoreline railway there resembles a canal as Storm Emma continues to rage this afternoon.

The scene in Sandycove, County Dublin where mountainous seas caused local flooding.

Snow 2018 Day2 692Waves pound Newtownsmith at Sandycove. Photo: Michael Chester

Despite warnings to the public to stay out of the water, a woman swimmer had to be rescued from the harbour in Sandycove.

Earlier today, as Afloat.ie reported here, breaking waves in north Dublin at Howth have caused damaged to a  pierside shed where some historic yachts are stored. 

Today's high tide at noon added to Howth's storm problems with the northeast gale little eased, and the waves continuously sweeping over the East Pier. While the actual damage timeline is still confused, it may well be that the worst of the destruction to the sheds at the end of the pier housing seven of the Howth 17s did not occur until around 1.30pm today, with reports of at least two boats seriously damaged

howth harbour today1Howth harbour today Photo: W M Nixon

Published in Dublin Bay
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

 

At A Glance – Dublin Bay

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south

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