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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire

Ambitions for a National Watersport Centre in Dun Laoghaire could be revived following the launch of a new State fund supporting infrastructure for multi-sports projects.

Applications are now being invited for the the Large Scale Sport Infrastructure Fund, launched by Ministers Shane Ross and Brendan Griffin this week.

The scheme is initially open to applications from national governing bodies (NGBs) and local authorities (LAs) and will consist of two streams.

Stream one, which is aimed at smaller NGBs and LAs, will help fund the development of proposals to tender stage. Stream two will assist applicants to bring projects from tender stage to completion.

The scheme encourages multi-functional sports facilities that will serve more than one sport — which is in line with previous proposals to make Dun Laoghaire a national hub for sailing, kayaking, rowing and more.

Sharing between sports, NGBs and LAs is encouraged and such projects will be viewed more favourably by the fund. The scheme will also require a minimum contribution of 30% from applicants toward the cost of any works/design.

The new fund is separate and distinct from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport’s long-running Sports Capital Programme (SCP), which is focused on smaller capital projects where the maximum grant is €150,000.

The full terms and conditions of the Large Scale Sport Infrastructure Fund and application forms can be found HERE.

Viking Marine is currently looking to recruit some hard-working and experienced sailing enthusiasts to work full time and part time as sales assistants in its Dun Laoghaire store.

If you are an experienced sailor with dinghy and yachts knowledge and are looking to share your passion with others, Viking Marine would love to hear from you.

Full details of the full-time and part-time sales assistant roles can be found on the Viking Marine website or click here.

To apply for either of these jobs, please e-mail your CV to [email protected]

Published in Viking Marine

Viking Marine in Dun Laoghaire has something special in store for this year’s Black Friday sales.

Be sure to visit next Friday 23 November for exclusive savings and major discounts on clothing, safety equipment, boat hardware and more.

And be the first to know about Viking Marine’s Black Friday deals — as well as getting inditer tips on regular discounts, exclusive offers, sailing tips and more besides — by signing up for their email newsletter.

Follow Viking Marine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the latest updates.

Published in Viking Marine

#Safety - Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council has posted a safety advisory for swimmers in Dun Laoghaire over an incident of plastic pollution between the West Pier and the Forty Foot.

According to the local authority, “small strips of plastic” that have washed ashore in recent days may be present in bathing waters.

While the plastic poses no chemical danger, it could be a nuisance or at worst a physical risk to swimmers.

As The Irish Times reports, contractors working on the redevelopment of the Dun Laoghaire baths site are launching a clean-up operation in the affected area after “a quantity of fibres” was washed into the water during a concrete pour.

It follows community efforts led by local environmental hero Flossie Donnelly, who recently donated a second Seabin for cleaning surface debris in Dun Laoghaire Harbour to the National Yacht Club.

#Seabin - Five months after local coastal litter campaigner Flossie Donnelly saw the installation of Dun Laoghaire Harbour’s first Seabin, the enterprising youth has presented the National Yacht Club with its own water-cleaning device.

According to the Dun Laoghaire waterfront club, 12-year-old Flossie’s fundraising efforts for Ireland’s first ever Seabin were so inspiring that the company behind the project donated a second device for free.

The Seabin is essentially a floating bucket with a pump that sucks in surfacedebris and traps it for collection. A single device has the potential to collect as many as 20,000 plastic bottles or more than 80,000 plastic bags each year.

Flossie’s Seabin initiative has since won some influential support from NYC stalwart Annalise Murphy, who raced around the world on board Turn the Tide on Plastic in the most recent Volvo Ocean Race.

The National Yacht Club has more on the story HERE.

Published in Dublin Bay

Ambitious plans for a digital technology hub at the former Dun Laoghaire ferry terminal have been scrapped by its developer in the absence of the necessary foreshore licence.

As recently as August, the Harbour Innovation Campus project was moving forward after securing planning permission almost a year after the scheme was announced.

However, in an email to interested parties as seen by Afloat.ie this evening (Monday 29 October), developer Philip Gannon said that a year after signing the lease on the former terminal building, “the landlords have still not secured the foreshore licence necessary to allow them to legally lease the building to us.

“Needless to say I am appalled by this fact, given all of the time and trouble that I put into this project. I spent nine months finding a suitable fit-out team that were due to start in January.

“When I told them that work could not commence until a foreshore licence was granted, they told me they don’t do ‘stand-by’ and would be starting on another project in the new year instead.”

Citing uncertainty surrounding the foreshore licence, and the difficulties involved in putting together a new fit-out team, Gannon said: “I felt that I had no option but to terminate the lease and find an alternative property elsewhere.”

He added: “I deeply regret that in the end, I was unable to make this vision a reality in Dun Laoghaire.”

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Gannon had been intending to invest €20 million in transforming the St Michael’s Pier building into the largest technology hub in Ireland, supporting up to 50 companies and as many as 1,000 jobs.

‘Safety at Sea Through War and Upheaval’ is the title of an exhibition now running at the dlr Lexicon in Dun Laoghaire, highlighting the history of Ireland’s lighthouses between the years 1911 and 1923.

Using resources from the Irish Lights archive, the exhibition – which runs till 7 January — next year explores the mission of safe navigation at sea in the context of the wider political and economic changes in Ireland at the time: independence, civil war, electrification and more.

A deeper focus on the years of the Great War is afforded by a new exhibition on the SS Hare and SS Adela in Dublin Port, which comes to dlr Lexicon this Monday (8 October) and tells the story of both ill-fated vessels during the rise of the U-boat threat from 1914 to 1918.

Keeping with the maritime theme, the late Des Branigan is the subject of a new display (opened yesterday, Friday 5 October) of archive material from photographs to books that give a rounded picture of a humble, ordinary seaman who achieved extraordinary things.

All exhibitions are open free to the public during library opening hours.

#Coastguard - Do you live in or around Dun Laoghaire and have time to volunteer? Do you drive? Are you aged between 18 and 65?

If so, you may be the right fit for Dun Laoghaire Coastguard, which is currently running a recruitment drive.

Send the unit a message via Dun Laoghaire Coastguard's official Facebook page with your details for further information about the important lifesaving role.

#RNLI - Shorter evenings mean having a method of calling for help on the water is more important than ever.

The message from the RNLI came after the Dun Laoghaire lifeboat launched on Tuesday evening (4 September) to a powerboat with three on board that had broken down in Killiney Bay.

The volunteer lifeboat crew was requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat at 7.50pm following a report from the Irish Coast Guard.

Weather conditions were fair with a northern breeze and visibility was good as the all-weather lifeboat located and successfully towed the vessel back towards Dun Laoghaire Marina. All three onboard were uninjured.

Commenting after the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI coxswain Mark McGibney said: “The long evenings are starting to get shorter, so it is vital to have a means of calling for help in case you do end up in trouble.”

#Superyachts - Afloat.ie has learned that superyacht Christopher is moored in Dun Laoghaire Marina this morning (Monday 13 August) after passage from Belfast.

The 46m Ron Holland-designed cruising ketch previously sailed into Dublin Bay in June 2014, when it was considered Dun Laoghaire’s largest ever visiting yacht.

Since then the marina has hosted various other super-sized vessels — including the 35.8m Arcadia, a yacht sturdy enough to transit the Northwest Passage — which prompted Afloat.ie to ask whether a dedicated superyacht berth could be a realistic proposal for Dun Laoghaire.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Marina
Page 5 of 46

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020