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Displaying items by tag: Fireball


The Irish Fireball fleet, minus those boats in transit from Barbados, descended on Killaloe at the southern end of Lough Derg for the season-opening regatta, the Open Sailing Championships. Hosted by the Killaloe Sailing Club for the first time in quite a few years, but based at the University of Limerick’s Activity Centre, the event attracted an excellent entry of 25 boats considering there were some significant absentees.

A large percentage of the fleet was home-based and the racing on the water was soon to validate the training sessions that Neil Colin and others have conducted both in Killaloe and Dun Laoghaire, when participants in those sessions featured in excellent individual race performances and overall positions.

Race Officer Liam Moloney and his team on the water had a very challenging weekend as the winds were light and on Sunday in particular, variable. Having said that, seven races were sailed when Race 3 was ordered to be re-sailed after a protest! The lightness of the breeze presented the fleet with the need for heightened awareness of wind on the water and meant that decisions on which way to go were much more significant than when the wind is more vigorous!

The new combination of Shane McCarthy & Noel Butler provided the element of consistency that these conditions demand to win by a comfortable margin of 4 points, but in terms of individual race wins they only took half the races. However, a discard of a 3rd shows how well these two sailed in the trying conditions.

The other race wins were shared by Neil Colin & Margaret Casey, who finished second overall, Louis McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe, who took third and Simon McGrotty & Ruairi Grimer who finished fourth overall. Colin/Casey had a very good series after discarding a tenth, while McKenna/O’Keeffe surprised everyone with the consistency of their boatspeed all weekend allowing them to win one race and add three other top four positions to their points tally.

Jim Ryan & David Tanner from the host club also hit a purple patch, scoring a 2nd, a 5th and a 6th to be the first local boat in 5th overall. Jon Evans & Aidan Caulfield led the fifth race of the regatta and only just lost out on the finish line to Butler/McCarthy. Other excellent race performances came from Marie Barry who counted three top ten finishes, Susie Coot & Christope LeScornet, in the Silver fleet who also scored three top ten finishes, Mary Chambers & Brenda McGuire who got a 9th in the last race and Derval O’Carrol & Siobhan Hayes who scored an eighth in Race 2. All these combinations were attendees at recent training sessions and this weekend saw the fruits of that training.

Saturday evening was spent in Crotty’s in Killaloe where the fleet enjoyed superb hospitality and lots of craic having pre-booked their meals for the evening at registration that morning. A traditional three-piece band played in the background keeping us distracted while with one eye on the TV screen we watched Ireland’s entry to Eurovision drop further and further down the scoreboard.

Having sailed four races on the Saturday, we appeared to be set up for an early finish on the Sunday when only two races were required to make up the series. However, with Race 3 thrown out on a technicality, three races were sailed on Sunday, before our guillotine on start times kicked in and a full six race series was completed.

The prevailing conditions meant that races were short and they may not have been to everyone’s taste, but in truth the race team did everything they could to get a regatta in and they couldn’t be faulted for effort.

The regatta also saw the competitive debut of our newest Fireball, 15018, a home built wide-bow in wood by Martin O’Toole. As the results below show, Martin and his crew Shane scored a 5th in one race.

Prizes for the event were provided by McWilliam’s Sailmakers and due thanks were offered to all those who had sponsored and contributed to the hosting of the event.

Sail No. Helm Crew Club 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total
Gold
14894 Noel Butler Shane McCarthy DMYC 1 3 2 1 3 1 8
14775 Neil Colin Margaret Casey DMYC 2 1 3 10 4 2 12
14691 Louis McKenna Hermine O’Keeffe RStGYC 8 6 4 3 1 4 18
Silver
14176 Susie Coote Christope LeScornet KSC 15 7 10 15.5 7 13 52
14416 Mary Chambers Brenda McGuire DMYC 17 15 12 22 17 9 70
15018 Martin O’Toole Shane O’Toole SSC
Published in Fireball
Tagged under

Neil Colin's appropriately named Elevation went straight to the top of the local Dublin Bay Sailing Club Fireball dinghy fleet in last night's race in Scotsman's Bay. Racing in moderate westerly conditions and an ebb tide, Marie Barry's Reality Check was second and Incubus (S Oram) third. In the IDRA 14 dinghy class Frank Hamilton's Dunmoanin continues his winning run. Full sailing results click read more.

 

DUBLIN PORT Dublin Bay Sailing Club Results for 18 MAY 2010                          

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Jalapeno (Dermod Baker et al), 2. Lula Belle (Liam Coyne)                        

CRUISERS 3 - 1. Grasshopper 2 (K & J Glynn), 2. Chouskikou (R.Sheehan/R.Hickey), 3. Papytoo (M.Walsh/F.Guilfoyle)         

CRUISERS 4 - 1. Maranda (Myles Kelly), 2. Aslana (J.Martin/B.Mulkeen), 3. Ghrazel (Charles Pearson)                                           

FIREBALL - 1. Elevation (N.Colin/M.Casey), 2. Reality Check (Marie Barry), 3. Incubus (S Oram)                         

GLEN - 1. Glencorel (B.Waldock/K.Malcolm)         

IDRA 14 FOOT - 1. Dunmoanin (Frank Hamilton), 2. Dart (Pierre Long), 3. Doody (J.Fitzgerald/J.Byrne)        

MERMAID - 1. Tiller Girl (J.O'Rourke), 2. Lively Lady (G O'Neill & M Hanney), 3. Kim (D Cassidy)                      

PY CLASS - 1. Joan Flanagan (Laser), 2. Richard Tate (Laser), 3. David Dwyer (Laser)                       

RUFFIAN 23 - 1. Alias (D.Meeke/M.McCarthy), 2. Cresendo (L Balfe), 3. Diane ll (Bruce Carswell)                     

SIGMA 33 - 1. White Mischief (Timothy Goodbody), 2. Pippa lV (G.Kinsman/K.Blake/M.O'Brien) 

SQUIB - 1. Little Demon (Marie Dee), 2. Periguin (N.Coakley/J.Redahan)

Published in DBSC
With the Fireball title race over, Irish teams now concentrate on the final races and improving their overall standing. But the moniker of World Champion is already gone. Cormac Bradley sends us another missive from the sandy shores of Bridgetown as the island event winds down.Chips Howarth and Vyv Townend have dominated the 2010 Worlds in Barbados with six race wins and two thirds under their belts. This currently gives them a 16-point advantage over Matt Burge & Richard Wagstaff who have a five point advantage over Matt Findlay & Richard Anderton. Fourth is Dave Edwards & Simon Potts with the first non UK boat, the Aussies Ben Schulz & Phillip Bowley in 5th overall.

Among the Irish sailing entries, Neil Spain & Francis Rowan are the leading boat in 21st overall with Noel Butler & Seamus Moore in 26th. These two have kept most of their results in the twenties with each having a mid-teens result and a 30th each as well.

In 35th overall, Messrs Laverty & Butler have scored results mostly in the thirties but with one result in the twenties (27th) and two in the forties. Next up is Smyth/Bradley in 46th with a high of a 31st and a low of a DNF. Their results are consistently in the forties. Frank Miller & Marguerite O'Rourke have not had a good series by their standards and lie in 49th with the last Irish boat Hannah Showell & Martina Michels in 60th.

Other well known combinations are as follows; Derian & Andy Scott (18th), Tim Rush & Russ Clark (9th), Vince Horey/ Sam Brearey (11th) and Heather McFarlane & Chris Payne (17th).

Two races tomorrow (Fri) conclude the series but Howarth/Townend don't look as though they need to sail them both. Prize-giving is scheduled for tomorrow evening.

It has been a physically challenging series even on those days when the wind eased. The fleet has been launching at 11:45ish for a 12:30 start and getting ashore at around 16:30. Most evenings have seen the club environs empty earlyish. Burning the midnight oil in a social context has been the exception rather than the rule!!
Published in Fireball
Tagged under

Fireball International Week, the warm up to next weeks world championships, concluded in Barbados yesterday. Dublin's Noel Butler and Seamus Moore were the best of the Irish with two 14s leaving them in 16th overall. Neil Spain and Franis Rowan finishe just outside the top 20 in 21st. Owen Laverty and Hugh Butler also had a good days sailing with two scores in the twenties. This allowed them to crack a top 30 finish in 29th. They were followed in the overal ranking by Smyth/Bradley in 37th, and Miller/O'Rourke in 56th. The 61 boat fleet was led home by a Brit 1-2-3 with Howarth/Townsend winning both races toiday to post a warning to all those with designs on their Worlds title. Second were Dave Edwards and Simon Potts, followed by Kevin Hope/Russell Thorne. The winners had a 2pt margin on second.

More on the forum thread here.

Published in Fireball
Tagged under

Spoiled for Choice

There’s no shortage of one-design classes from which to choose and each gives its enthusiasts great competition, fun and camaraderie, writes Graham Smith in this review of the classes. A profile of each active class in Ireland is supplied below; just click on the title link (in bold) or the Class Association link to go directly to the information.

One-design racing is where it all starts. It is, after all, where all the top sailors earned their stripes, battling away for line honours without a thought for a handicapper’s calculator wiping away a hard-fought victory!

Indeed, you could count on less than one hand the number of top Irish sailors who didn’t cut their teeth in a one-design dinghy! Just think of Cudmore, Barrington, Watson, Wilkins, Hennessy and Dix to name a few and you realise that they honed their skills in everything from Enterprises to Lasers and a lot in between.

At present count, there are a little over 30 one-design classes in Ireland, split almost evenly between dinghies and keelboats, a statistic which might raise a few eyebrows. They range from the long-established Mermaids, IDRA14s and Dragons to the newer additions like Fevas, Topaz and RS Elite. They all fill a particular need and give their owners and crews considerable enjoyment.

Many have attracted their World or European Championships to Irish waters over the years and while 2009 is notable for a lack of such events here, the following year will see the Etchells Worlds at Howth and perhaps a few other international regattas too.

In addition to the review, we asked each class to complete a questionnaire giving details of their fleet numbers, whether they were on a growth pattern or holding their own, so we could highlight those ‘on the up’ and those remaining static in terms of numbers. The older traditional designs, as you might imagine, fall into the latter category, although that’s not a negative!

 

CLASS REVIEW  The State of the Classes – League Table (as at February 2009)

S = Static; U = Up/growing

275     Optimist   U

200+   Laser   S

189     Mermaid   S

160     Flying Fifteen   S

130     RS Feva   U

115     Shannon One Design    U

100+   Mirror   S

100+   Topper   U

99       Topaz   U

94       Laser SB3   U

87       GP14   U

85       Squib   S

70       Fireball   S

70       Ruffian   S

60       J24   S

60       Shipman   S

52       Dragon   S

50       RS400/200   S

50       420    U

43       Multihulls    U

42       Dragon    S

40       Water Wags    U

40       Wayfarer    S

34       IDRA14    U

33       Puppeteer    U

28       Etchells    S

27       E-Boat    U

26       Glen    S

25       Enterprise    S

18       Sigma 33    S

18       Howth 17    U

13       RS Elite    U

Published in General
Page 44 of 44

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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