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Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News

#Superyachts - All indications show the superyacht market is turning around — and as it expands, it’s important to note that more and more of these vessels are eschewing crowded Mediterranean spots and cruising instead in Northern European waters.

Typically these luxury craft, many greater than 50 metres in length, are heading to northern destinations such as the Orkney IslandsNorway and Sweden that are already popular with cruise liners.

On the way, they’re transiting the Irish Sea — and seeking opportunities for safe and convenient berths close to transport links in the UK and Ireland alike. Dun Laoghaire is perfectly positioned to capitalise on this market.

Super yacht Dublin cityThe completion of the Samuel Beckett Bridge across the River Liffey in Dublin City effectively meant the demise of the Dublin City Mooring facility in 2010 as large craft could no longer transit the river. During their relatively short period of operation, the modest Dublin City Mooring pontoons in the heart of Dublin was able to attract a number of superyachts (like the Triple 7 above) to berth on their pontoon which was located conveniently in the heart of Dublin. This is no longer possible and has effectively ended Dublin as a destination for visiting superyachts but these superyachts still want to come here

Above and beyond the local spend on overnight berths, and victualling these superyachts, there are significant opportunities to target high net worth individuals in the luxury tourism market. And Dublin is a recognised go-to destination.

dun laoghaire harbour aerialThe Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company is currently marketing the harbour as a cruise ship destination in competition to the existing location of Dublin Port. It is seeking to establish the harbour as a stop over for small to medium sized cruise ships and has identified the Carlisle Pier for this purpose. Super yachts can also be accomodated in this plan. Photo: Michael Chester

Many of these superyachts are the size of small ships, weighing over 250 tonnes. It means they’re too big for Dun Laoghaire’s 800–berth yachting marina, but they represent a welcome boon for a harbour vacant since the loss of the Stena HSS ferry service. One recent arrival into Dun Laoghaire was the magnificent Atlantic schooner from America in August. Read Aflaot.ie's article on the Atlantic's visit here.

Arcadia yachtThe 35.80m Arcadia berthed in Dun Laoghaire in September 2014. Not only does the impressive 'Arcadia' have gorgeous lines but as the 159th vessel to transit the Northwest Passage, she's also a serious long distance expedition motor yacht too

SY ChristopherEven seasoned observers were gobsmacked at the sheer size of the 46–metre (150–foot) Superyacht Christopher berthed at Dun Laoghaire marina in 2014, dwarfing all 500 local craft in the harbour. Christopher represents the upper limit of craft permitted at the marina due to weight and draft restrictions. In fact Christoper could only be facilitated in the marina due to the fact she has a lifting keel

What's more thanks to the Failte Ireland accredited marina, it has the type of 'concierge' facilities to deal with visiting superyachts: everything from car hire to hotel bookings.

But this isn't an overture for billionaires who have no place to park their superyacht. There's a business case to say that Dun Laoghaire town can easily take advantage of this.

Atlantic superyacht dun laoghaireThe two-year-old 185–ft three-masted schooner Atlantic alongside at Dun laoghaire Harbour in August. The replica that was too big for the yachting marina stayed for a week at a secure but somewhat neglected (below) berth No.4 alongside at the abandoned ferry terminal. Photos: TwitterAtlantic superyacht dun laoghaireThe facilities required to operate a Super yacht berth amenity are relatively few. A serviced, heavy duty linear concrete pontoon of approximately 80–100m length with shore access via a bridge. Secure access by crew, guests and staff only. Crew facilities could be located in the ferry terminal and be accessible 24 hours to include toilet and shower facilities and wifi access. There is an existing level of security infrastructure which would be utilised including CCTV and Harbour Police to give added assurance to crew and guests that their boat will be secure at all times

At a time when nothing seems to be going right for Dun Laoghaire, these boats could be an important part in the mix of rejuvenating the harbour, bringing much needed revenues — and a splash of glamour.

They’re coming here already, but more could be done to market Dun Laoghaire as a superyacht destination that could even see the harbour as a winter lay-up hub, too.

To attract them would not need consultants, planning permission, investment, tenders — just the space they need. And that’s already available in Dun Laoghaire, which has four vacant ship berths capable of accommodating such vessels.

The question isn’t whether Dun Laoghaire can attract this lucrative superyacht business — the question is, who in the harbour will take the initiative?

super yacht graphicSource: Towergate Insurance

Published in Dublin Bay

#Superyacht - Sailing tests have begun on what’s purported to be one of the world’s largest sailing yachts, as Mail Online reports.

Sailing Yacht A’s functional name is very much an understatement, as this enormous vessel is more than 140m long, comprising eight decks with 90m masts, making it more like a skyscraper than the boats moored at your local marina.

Priced at some €365 million, and designed by the renowned Philippe Starck, the luxury ship was built in Germany for Russian billionaire Andrey Melnichenko as a replacement for his 2008 vessel Motor Yacht A, another Starck design.



The new A also boasts the latest in sailing technology, with digitally controlled sails, a carbon-fibre-impregnated hull and bomb-proof glass.

It’s not the only superyacht in the news, as Royal Huisman has taken an order for its largest vessel to date — and the largest aluminium hulled yacht yet conceived — at a comparatively modest 81m in length. Yacht Harbour has more on the story HERE.

This story has been updated with additional information.

Published in News Update

Dun Laoghaire harbour welcomed the Maltese flagged cruising superyacht 'Ganesha' this morning. The 46 metre sailing yacht arrived into the Irish east coast port and took a prime marina berth, she's the second superyacht appearance in a month for Dun Laoghaire, record breaking Rambler 88 arrived in port prior to last month's Round Ireland race

The 46m Vitters build is named after an Indian deity and is a regular on the international superyacht regatta circuit.

Superyachts are becoming regular visitors to the Irish coastline as facilities such as coastal marinas improve. Kinsale welcomed The 55m ‘Galileo G’ in May and this month the south coast port received the 73m Grace E arrived at the yacht club marina.

Ganesha superyacht150–ft superyacht Ganesha along side at Dun Laoghaire marina this morning. Photo: Dun Laoghaire marina

Published in Dublin Bay
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With aerial views of the Charles Fort, James Fort, visiting Super yacht 'Grace E' and the town marina, Kinsale is filmed by drone pilot Daniel Foran with spectacula results for the harbour that marks the start of the Wild Atlantic Way.

 

Published in Kinsale
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The latest superyacht visitor to Kinsale Yacht Club Marina makes quite an impact alongside at the yacht club pontoon today.

'It's not too often we get these large boats into visit' Matthias Hellstern, Kinsale Yacht Club's Rear Commodore told Afloat.ie

‘Grace E’ is a Superyacht, 73 metres in length and built in 2014 by Perini Navi Group Italy. She won Motor Yacht of the Year at the World Superyacht Awards 2015

Grace E Kinsale yacht club superyachtSuperyacht 'Grace E' moored in Kinsale harbour

Published in Kinsale

Now regular visitor Superyacht ‘Air’ returned to Cork this morning. The yacht is moored off Cork Harbour anchored off the spit lighthouse in Cobh. This black hulled Dutch-built Feadship was launched in March in 2011 and called to the Irish South coast in 2012 and in 2015. The yacht is available for charter at the reported rate of €750,000 per week. Onboard luxury inlcudes a helicopter pad and 102-inch pop-up movie screen.

If the superyacht follows her usual Irish itinerary then she will move on to Kinsale where she anchors in the mouth of the harbour and tenders in and out. Last year they anchored in the lee of the old head and the onboard helicopter flew from the boat up to the golf course. See our 2015 photos of the superyacht.

Published in Cork Harbour
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Only 24 hours day after the world’s largest privately owned yacht sailed into Cork harbour, a second Superyacht arrived in Kinsale this afternoon.

In an early season boost for the Cork coast, the massive yachts make a fine spectacle in both harbours this evening.

The ‘Galileo G’ is a 55m Perini Navi ice class steel displacement hull built in 2011, British flagged and has accommodation for 10 guests and 12 crew. It is powered by two caterpillar engines with a cruising speed of 11 knots giving it a range of 9,000 nautical miles.

Gallileo G super yacht kinsale

The hull design is from Philippe Briand and the exterior design is from the Vitruvius series

‘It is great to see boats of this calibre now becoming regular visitors to the area', said local yacht broker John McDonald of MGM Boats who welcomed the boat into the town.

Published in Kinsale
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The AGM of the Irish Marina Operators Association (IMOA) took place this month at the end of another successful season. The news from around the coast is that visitor numbers are excellent with Irish marinas attracting large numbers of boats from Britain, France and Norway in particular. Superyachts continue to see Ireland as a new and exciting destination as well as smaller cruising boats from all over the world. Some marinas are filling up again with demand being seen for larger berths in particular. Marina operators are also investing significant sums to upgrade and improve the existing facilities.

On the marketing front, the recent Southampton Boat Show was a success for a number of members who exhibited there. There is an appetite to market Ireland as a marine leisure destination and it is hoped that further marketing in the UK can be carried out.

The topic of dredging was discussed at length and the members aired their frustration at the drawn-out process to receive permission to carry out maintenance works. Similarly it was disappointing to hear that there is still no movement on the Maritime Area and Foreshore (Amendment) Bill 2013. The lack of progress on this front is potentially damaging for the industry as a whole.

Finally, it was agreed by all members that there is a change in the outlook of customers/boat owners and a more positive attitude is evident right around the coast.

Published in Irish Marinas

#kinsalesuperyacht – Kinsale is a destination of choice for superyachts with a second making a call to the south coast harbour within a week. The 35–metre Vitters built SY 'Ghost'  is moored at the Blue flag Kinsale Yacht Club marina this morning and expected to stay until Saturday morning.

The lightweight high performance sailing yacht has a carbon fibre hull and superstructure, the first of its kind for the yard. Her visit follows a return visit from MY 'Air' currently anchored in the shelter of the Old Head, an 81m Feadship.

Published in Kinsale
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#superyachtvisit – Return visitor to Ireland, the 81-metre long super motor yacht 'AIR' cut a dramatic pose as an early season caller to Cork Harbour yesterday. As Afloat reported previously, this black hulled Dutch-built Feadship was launched in March in 2011 and called to the Irish South coast in 2012. The yacht is available for charter at the reported rate of €750,000 per week. Onboard luxury inlcudes a helicopter pad and 102-inch pop-up movie screen.

The largest yacht ever to be built at the Koninklijke De Vries yard, AIR has a sleek and elegant exterior with modern lines, it has a matte black steel hull, and an aluminium superstructure. She measures 265.7 feet in length and has a beam of nearly 39 feet.

Extremely spacious, the vessel can accommodate 12 guests in 7 roomy staterooms including an impressive split level owner's suite, two guest cabins on the upper deck, one cabin on the main deck, and three on the lower deck. The owners' observation lounge offers a breathtaking view over the eight-meter long pool on the main deck's forward area.

Published in Cruise Liners
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Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

At A Glance – Dublin Bay

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south

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