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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: World Championships

#CANOEING: Noel and Robert Hendrick narrowly missed a podium finish at the Junior and Under-23 Canoe Slalom World Championships in Brazil. The twin brothers, competing in a Junior C2 (Canadian canoe), finished fourth behind French, Czech and German pairings. The Hendricks compete for Ribbontail Canoe Club in Enfield in County Meath. Three Ireland competitors exited at the semi-final stage: Jake Cochrane (C1, Under-23), Aisling Conlan (K1, Under-23) and Robert Hendrick  (C1 Junior). The Hendrick brothers are set to compete at the European Junior and Under-23 Canoe Slalom Championships in Poland next August.

ICF Canoe Slalom Junior and Under-23 World Championships, Foz do Iguassu, Brazil (Selected Results) – C2 Men, Junior: 1 France 104.25 seconds, 2 Czech Republic 101.64, 3 Germany 105.55; 4 Ireland (N Hendrick, R Hendrick) 109.91.

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Aisling Conlan finished 47th in her heat of the K1 (racing kayak) at the Canoe Slalom World Championships in Deep Creek in Maryland in the United States today. The Ireland competitor needed to finish in the top 30 to qualify for the semi-finals. Maialen Chourraut of Spain was the fastest in the heats with a time of 111.45 seconds.

Canoe Slalom World Championships, Deep Creek, Maryland, United States - Day Two (Selected Results; Irish interest)

Women

K1 – Heats (Top 30 Qualify for Semi-Finals): 1 Spain (M Chourraut) 111.45; 47 Ireland (A Conlan) 136.20.

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Robert Hendrick finished 46th in his heat at the Canoe Slalom World Championships in Deep Creek in the United States today. The top 30 qualified for the semi-finals. The 16-year-old C1 (Canadian canoe) paddler had two touches on his first run and four on his second. Alexander Slafkovsky of Slovakia qualified in top position.

Canoe Slalom World Championships, Deep Creek, Maryland, United States (Selected Results, Irish interest) 

Men

C1 Heats (Top 30 qualify for the semi-finals): 46 R Hendrick 134.24.

K1 Heats (Top 40 qualify for semi-finals): 53 S Curtis 114.54; 60 P Hynes 124.61.

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Published in Canoeing

#ROWING: Ireland’s Lisa Dilleen and Leonora Kennedy finished second in the B Final of the women’s pair at the World Rowing Championships in Amsterdam today, placing them eighth overall. Russia’s Liana Gorgodze and Elizaveta Tikhanova, the second slowest of the crews in the semi-finals, took this race by storm. They led all the way down the course despite constant attempts to head them by Ireland, the one crew which mounted a consistent challenge.

World Rowing Championships, Day Seven (Irish interest, selected results)

Women

Pair – B Final (Places 7 to 13): 1 Russia (L Gorgodze, E Tikhanova) 7:06.08, 2 Ireland (L Kennedy, L Dilleen) 7:09.20, 3 Serbia 7:10.61, 4 Canada 7:12.15, 5 Ukraine 7:18.40, 6 Czech Republic 7:19.72.

Published in Rowing

#CANOEING: Andrzej Jezierski finished sixth in his semi-final of the men’s C1 200m at the Canoe Sprint World Championships and will compete in tomorrow’s B Final in Moscow. Peter Egan and Simas Dobrovolskis were seventh in their semi-final of the men’s K1 200m and will go to the C Final. Jenny Egan made her exit from the K1 200m, as she finished eighth in her semi-final, and finished 11th in the women’s 5,000 metres. Jenny Burke placed 4th in the B final of the K1 1,000m, 13th overall.

Canoe Sprint World Championships, Day Four (Irish interest, selected results)

Men

K2 200m – Semi-Final: 7 P Egan, S Dobrovolskis 34.004.

C1 200m – Semi-Final (First Three to A Final; next Three to B Final; rest out): 1 Lithuania 38.320; 6 A Jezierski 39.638.

Women

K1 – B Final (Places 10 to 18): 4 J Burke 3:05.18.

K1 200 – Semi-Final: 8 J Egan 43.097.

K1 5,000 – Final: 1 Britain 23 mins, 10.957 secs; 11 J Egan 24:08.510

 

Published in Canoeing

#ROWING: The Ireland team for the World Rowing Championships has been named. A team of 14 athletes in seven boats have been selected for the event, which will be held in Amsterdam from August 24th to 31st.

Crews have been based at the National Rowing Centre, where they have been on training and undergoing extensive testing since the World Cup regattas at Aiguebelette in France and Lucerne in Switzerland.

Ireland Team for World Rowing Championships, Amsterdam, August 24th to 31st

Men:

Lightweight Pair: Niall Kenny (UCD BC), Mark O’Donovan (UCD BC)

Lightweight Single Scull (ML1x): Paul O’Donovan (UCD BC)

Women

Four: Barbara O’Brien (NUIG BC), Aifric Keogh (NUIG BC), Emily Tormey (NUIG BC) and Marie O’Neill (Cork BC)

Pair: Lisa Dilleen (Gráinne Mhaol RC) and Leonora Kennedy (Portora BC)

Double Scull: Monika Dukarska (Killorglin RC) and Helen Walshe (Three Castles RC)

Lightweight Double Scull: Denise Walsh (Skibbereen RC) and Claire Lambe (Old Collegians BC)

Single Scull: Sanita Puspure (Old Collegians BC)

Published in Rowing

#ROWING: Paul O’Donovan won his heat of the lightweight single sculls at the World Under-23 Rowing Championships at Varese in Italy today. Britain’s Sam Mottram held the lead in the middle stages of the race, but O’Donovan passed him and won, with Brazil and Japan taking the other qualifying places for the quarter-finals.

The Ireland four of Richie Bennett, Kevin Neville, Fionán McQuillan-Tolan and Rob O’Callaghan finished fifth in their heat and will compete in a repechage tomorrow. The Irish could not find a way into contention for the top-three spot they needed. Italy won from Croatia and the United States. Belarus took fourth.

World Under-23 Championships, Varese, Italy. Day One (Selected Results; Irish interest)

Men

Four – Heat One (First Three to A/B Semi-Finals): 1 Italy 6:00.06, 2 Croatia 6:02.31, 3 United States 6:05.38; 4 Belarus 6:07.95, 5 Ireland (R Bennett, K Neville, F McQuillan-Tolan, R O’Callaghan) 6:22.36.

Lightweight Single Sculls (First Four to Quarter-Finals): 1 Ireland (P O’Donovan) 7:08.58, 2 Britain 7:11.14, 3 Brazil 7:19.02, Japan 7:20.05; 5 Portugal 7:22.59.

Published in Rowing

#CANOEING: Ireland junior canoeist Liam Jegou took a silver medal today at the Canoe Slalom Under-23 and Junior World Championships in Sydney, Australia. On a difficult course in Penrith, only Florian Breuer of Germany was faster in the C1 (canoe single) than the Irishman. Both men took one touch, Jegou’s on the fourth gate. Roman Malyshev of Russia was third and Britain’s Samuel Ibbotson fourth.

“It’s great, I am really happy,” Jegou said. He had come close to a podium finish in the last two years, finishing sixth last year and fourth in 2012.

Canoe Slalom World Under-23 and Junior Championships, Penrith, Sydney (Irish interest):

C1 Men – Semi-Final (10 qualify): 1 Britain (S Ibbotson) 109.47; 6 Ireland (L Jegou) 112.11 (2.64 behind). Final: 1 Germany (F Breuer) 104.31, 2 Ireland (L Jegou) 107.61, 3 Russia (R Malyshev) 108.54.

Published in Canoeing

#ROWING: The Ireland trials on Newry Canal this weekend may be altered because of the forecast of bad weather. Time trials are scheduled for both days over five kilometres, but the distance on Sunday might be cut to 2.5 km. The hope is to use the more sheltered part of the course.

Meanwhile, the Cork Head of the River is now set to be held on March 8th. The interest in the Erne Head of the River on March 1st is impressive, with 77 crews entered.

Published in Rowing

#CanoeMarathon2013: Ireland’s Jenny Egan and Peter Egan finished 15th and 19th respectively at the Canoe Marathon World Championships at Lake Bagsværd, Denmark, today. Jenny Egan started promisingly but was knocked back by her performances on the portages.

Peter Egan was generally faster on his portages on his paddle, but did lose control of his boat on one and lost time.

Last year, in Rome, Peter Egan finished 17th and Jenny Egan 16th.

Canoe Marathon World Championships, Lake Bagsværd, Denmark (Irish Interest, Selected Results)

Men, K1 (30.1 km): 1 H McGregor (South Africa) 2 hourse 10 mins 34 seconds; 19 P Egan (Ireland) 2:15.26.

Women, K (25.8 km) 1: R Csay (Hungary) 2:01.26; 15 J Egan (Ireland) 2:09.23.

 

 

Published in Canoeing
Page 9 of 13

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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