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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: yacht

HOWTH YACHT CLUB. DINGHY REGATTA (O'ALL) 24/07/2011 Optimist: 1, Adam Hyland RStGYC (2.00); 2, Ronan Cournane RCYC (3.00); 3, Richard Hogan HYC (6.00); Optimist Junior: 1, Jamie McMahon HYC (7.00); 2, Luke Rickard NYC (9.00); 3, Megan Cahill HYC (14.00); Sundry: 1, Sean Anglim 4.7 MYC (3.00); 2, Aoife Hopkins 4.7 HYC (3.00); 3, Lizzy McDowell 420 MYC (5.00)
Published in Howth YC
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DBSC Tuesday + Saturday Series 3 sees Howth Yacht Club domination... 19/07/2011 17 Footer SCRATCH: 1, Rita Curley/Lynch; 2, Hera M & J Duffy; 3, Deilginis Deilginis Group; 17 Footer HCAP: 1, Sheila HYC Inst. Team; 2, Hera M & J Duffy; 3, Rita Curley/Lynch TUESDAY SERIES 3 Puppeteer SCRATCH: 1, Yellow Peril N Murphy; 2, Eclipse A & R Hegarty; 3, Trick or Treat A Pearson; Puppeteer HPH: 1, Eclipse A & R Hegarty; 2, Yellow Peril N Murphy; 3, Mr. Punch NiBhraonain/Wilson; Squib SCRATCH: 1, Astrix M McCaughey; 2, Kerfuffle Craig/Ruane; 3, Arctic Fox G Barry; Squib HPH: 1, Astrix M McCaughey; 2, Kerfuffle Craig/Ruane; 3, Arctic Fox G Barry; Etchells SCRATCH: 1, Kootamundra D O'Grady; 2, Jabberwocky S Knowles; SB3 SCRATCH: 1, Shockwave E Quinlan; 2, Investwise G May; 3, Sin a Bhuifl Guinness/Costigan
Published in Howth 17
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HOWTH YACHT CLUB. WEDNESDAY SERIES 2 (RACE) 13/07/2011 Class 1 IRC: 1, Trinculo M Fleming; 2, Crazy Horse Reilly/Chambers; 3, Tiger Hughes/Harris; Class 1 HPH: 1, Tiger Hughes/Harris; 2, Crazy Horse Reilly/Chambers; 3, Trinculo M Fleming; Class 2 IRC: 1, King One D Cullen; 2, MiniMumm Cobbe/McDonald; 3, Impetuous Noonan/Chambers; Class 2 HPH: 1, MiniMumm Cobbe/McDonald; 2, King One D Cullen; 3, Impetuous Noonan/Chambers; Class 3 IRC: 1, Pinnochio N Davidson; 2, Alliance V Gaffney; 3, Rock Lobster Delaney/Archer; Class 3 HPH: 1, Rock Lobster Delaney/Archer; 2, Crazy Horse M Shanahan; 3, Hellyhunter L McMurtry; White Sails HPH: 1, On the Rox J & C Boyle; 2, Brazen Hussy Barry/Stirling; 3, Bite the Bullet C Bermingham; White Sails IRC: 1, On the Rox J & C Boyle; 2, Bite the Bullet C Bermingham; 3, Brazen Hussy Barry/Stirling
Published in Howth YC
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HOWTH YACHT CLUB. TUE + SAT SERIES 2 (RACE) 12/07/2011 17 Footer SCRATCH: 1, Deilginis Deilginis Group; 2, Pauline O'Doherty/Ryan; 3, Rita Curley/Lynch; 17 Footer HCAP: 1, Zaida T Houlihan; 2, Pauline O'Doherty/Ryan; 3, Deilginis Deilginis Group TUESDAY SERIES 2 Puppeteer SCRATCH: 1, Harlequin Clarke/Egan; 2, Yellow Peril N Murphy; 3, Ile Molene Byrne/Stanley; Squib SCRATCH: 1, Chatterbox J Kay; 2, Puffin E Harte; 3, Fantome N MacDonell; Etchells SCRATCH: 1, Kootamundra D O'Grady; 2, Fetching Quinn/O'Flaherty; 3, Jabberwocky S Knowles; SB3 SCRATCH: 1, Sin a Bhuifl Guinness/Costigan; 2, Dinghy Supplies S Murphy; 3, Investwise G May; Puppeteer HPH: 1, Mr. Punch NiBhraonain/Wilson; 2, Ile Molene Byrne/Stanley; 3, Haemoglobin Mullen/O'Dea; Squib HPH: 1, Puffin E Harte; 2, Chatterbox J Kay; 3, Arctic Fox G Barry
Published in Howth 17
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There was fun on the river at Crosshaven for the Second Saturday of Royal Cork's Optimist July League for all four fleets Gold, Silver, Bronze and Copper. Three races were sailed starting out very light and ending up with about 8 knots in Cork Harbour. Plus we have one or two shots from an eight boat 420 Munsters. SCROLL DOWN FOR PICS by Bob Bateman.
Published in Royal Cork YC
The Irish Examiner reports that three man have been rescued after their yacht got into difficulty near Furbo in Galway Bay this afternoon.
Galway's RNLI lifeboat was dispatched to retrieve the men after their distress call to the Irish Coast Guard.
The men were en route to Rossaveal Harbour at the time when their yacht became tied up in fishing pots.
The Irish Examiner reports that three man have been rescued after their yacht got into difficulty near Furbo in Galway Bay this afternoon. 

Galway's RNLI lifeboat was dispatched to retrieve the men after their distress call to the Irish Coast Guard

The men were en route to Rossaveal Harbour at the time when their yacht became tied up in fishing pots.
Published in RNLI Lifeboats
The yacht once owned by former Taoiseach Charles Haughey will return to Ireland next week for its new life as a marine research vessel after completing the first leg of the 2011 Tall Ships Races.
The 52-foot Celtic Mist, the only Irish entrant in this year's races, came "a respectable last in our class”, skipper Fiacc Ó Brolcháin told The Irish Times from Scotland.
As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the yacht will know be fitted out with scientific instruments after it was gifted by the Haughey family to the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) to support its conservation work.

The yacht once owned by former Taoiseach Charles Haughey will return to Ireland next week for its new life as a marine research vessel after completing the first leg of the 2011 Tall Ships Races. 

The 52-foot Celtic Mist, the only Irish entrant in this year's races, came "a respectable last in our class”, skipper Fiacc Ó Brolcháin told The Irish Times from Scotland. 

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the yacht will know be fitted out with scientific instruments after it was gifted by the Haughey family to the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) to support its conservation work.

Published in Tall Ships
5th July 2011

Oona Wins in Howth

HOWTH YACHT CLUB. TUE + SAT SERIES 2 05/07/2011 17 Footer SCRATCH: 1, Oona P Courtney; 2, Leila R Cooper; 3, Aura I Malcolm; 17 Footer HCAP: 1, Leila R Cooper; 2, Oona P Courtney; 3, Zaida T Houlihan TUESDAY SERIES 2 Puppeteer SCRATCH: 1, Harlequin Clarke/Egan; 2, Yellow Peril N Murphy; 3, Gold Dust Walls/Browne; Squib SCRATCH: 1, Puffin E Harte; 2, Pot Black I & R McMurtry; 3, Arctic Fox G Barry; Etchells SCRATCH: 1, Jabberwocky S Knowles; 2, Northside Dragon J Bourke; SB3 SCRATCH: 1, Sin a Bhuifl Guinness/Costigan; 2, Dinghy Supplies S Murphy; Puppeteer HPH: 1, Ile Molene Byrne/Stanley; 2, Harlequin Clarke/Egan; 3, Yellow Peril N Murphy; Squib HPH: 1, Puffin E Harte; 2, Arctic Fox G Barry; 3, Pot Black I & R McMurtry
Published in Howth YC
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In the biggest and most competitive race in the 34 year history of the Three Peaks Yacht Race, the Irish boat 'Danu Technologies', skippered by Glen Ward, stayed ahead of the competition to win in a time of 77 hours 37 minutes.

The victory was all the remarkable given the Ker 35 was last across the line after a disastrous start. The race began at Barmouth on the mid-Wales coast last Saturday and sea conditions were treacherous with 20 foot waves making it difficult for the race fleet to even leave the harbour.

Danu Techologies, entering the race for the first time, was still being prepared minutes before the start, had to be cut from its moorings and then suffered damage as it motored through the worst of the seas to the start line. Crashing down from a big wave one of the runners aboard was swept across the deck and broke a stanchion, which then punctured the jib, and the navigation computer on which the race route had been planned was destroyed. As the start flare fired the boat was out of position with its mainsail trailing, yet the crew of 3 and their two mountain runners finished the race as winners. They made the 6th fastest passage to Caernarfon, where elite Irish mountain runners, Deon McNeilly and Gary Bailey, made the 24 mile crossing of Mount Snowdon, the highest point in Wales, in the hours of darkness in 5 hours and 10 minutes. After a safe passage of the Menai Strait, and with light winds prevailing, the racing pedigree of a boat designed originally for the IRM Grand Prix rule enabled the team to take the lead. The runners then stayed ahead on the longest land stage, reaching Scafell Pike, England's highest summit, after a mountain bike ride to Ennerdale and a run across Black Sail Pass, which took 8 hours and 6 minutes.

The 32 boats taking part faced strong headwinds, then light airs and periods of calm on the route around the Mulls of Galloway and Kintyre and up through the Inner Hebridean islands to reach Fort William, and the final summit, Ben Nevis. A unique feature of the race is that yachts are rowed through periods of calm and the crew of Andrew Miles and John Prudhoe, took their turn at the oars when required to stay ahead of the challenge from Team Whistler, an Australian team who have formerly won the Tasmanian 3 Peaks Yacht Race and were looking for a unique double win in a Reflex 38. Unable to make up the deficit when they arrived second at Fort William the Australian team switched tactics to win the Tilman Trophy, which requires 4 of the team to reach a mountain summit. Skipper David Rees and crewman Tim Jones put on their walking boats to climb Ben Nevis and claim the prestigious trophy, though they did lose second place overall to Team White Cloud, a HOD 35, skippered by John Donnelly.

The other major trophy of the race, for the Kings of the Mountains, went to endurance runners Martin Beale and Ian Ridgeway, who were racing on team Peaks Addix. They were fastest on all 3 peaks and had a total running time of 13 hours 30 minutes, 2 hours ahead of their nearest challengers.

From the 32 starters there have been 5 retirements and 4 boats are presently still making their way to the finish. At the back of the field is another international team, The Flemish Lowlanders, whose runners were involved in a dramatic rescue of two climbers on Scafell Pike on Tuesday. The Belgian team have until the course closes at 18.00 on Saturday to reach the finish line and complete the race.

Published in Racing
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Rosslare RNLI lifeboat was launched in the early hours of this morning (Wednesday 29 June 2011) to go to the aid of a 40 ft yacht that was badly damaged following a collision with a three masted 100 ft Norwegian Tall Ship ten miles south east of Rosslare Harbour. SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO.

The lifeboat launched at 2.38am and was on scene at 3.32am. Reports had been received from Dublin Coast Guard that the yacht was in urgent need of assistance after being damaged on collision with another vessel and was taking on water.

Arriving on scene the volunteer lifeboat crew saw debris in the water and noticed a considerable amount of damage to the yacht on the port side. They immediately assessed the state of the crew on both vessels, fifteen were onboard the Tall Ship and a single crewmember onboard the yacht.

cas_vess

The casualty vessel - Photo: RNLI

On establishing there were no injuries three lifeboat crew boarded the yacht and cleared some of the debris from the water. Due to the damage the lifeboat crew took the yacht under tow back to Rosslare Harbour and the Tall ship made its way on to Waterford.

The Irish Coast Guard Helicopter from Waterford arrived on scene and provided a strong search light overhead for the crews to work in. Conditions were good with a slight swell.

Commenting on the callout, Rosslare Deputy Launching Authority Dave Maloney said, " While there was damage to one of the vessels thankfully there was no serious injury to any person. The priority for the lifeboat crews was to ensure that there was no danger to anyone and that the vessel was taken back to shore as quickly as possible due to the threat of sinking.”

Afloat's latest Tall Ships News HERE

Published in Tall Ships
Page 9 of 14

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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