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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Dublin Bay

A Dun Laoghaire Senator has described this week's €35m Brexit Infrastructure Fund as an 'opportunity' for improvement of crumbling Dublin Bay Harbours.

Senator Barry Ward tweeted that both Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours in Dalkey County Dublin and Dun Laoghaire Harbour were all in need of 'urgent attention' in different ways.

Marine Minister Charlie McConalogue T.D., announced on Monday the new scheme to rejuvenate local authority public piers and harbours throughout coastal communities.

Afloat previously reported in 2020 how the popular Dalkey Island seasonal ferryboat stopped service due to a partial collapse of a cliff-face underneath a footpath leading to the pier at Coliemore Harbour, Co. Dublin

And in 2018, Bulloch Harbour's Bicencentary was against a backdrop of Storm Damage suffered in Storm Emma.

Senator Barry WardSenator Barry Ward

Announcing the scheme, the Minister said this week “This record funding for our coastal communities is an unprecedented opportunity for us to invest in our publicly owned piers and harbours and will shape the future of our coastal communities. Brexit has and will continue to affect our seafood sector in a unique way compared to other industries. I am delighted to be able to offer this level of investment so that we can deliver safe, accessible, lasting infrastructure and support economic diversification right around our coastline.”

Published in Dublin Bay

Wednesday morning saw some early 2022 season double-handed two boat tuning for a pair of Jeanneau Sunfast 3600 keelboats on Dublin Bay.

ISORA campaigners Searcher (Pete Smyth) and John O'Gorman's Hot Cookie enjoyed 10-15 knots north-westerlies for a fast reach from Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Searcher and Hot Cookie, both from the National Yacht Club, cut quite a dash crossing a deserted bay at speed under pink and red spinnakers.

The pair returned to the harbour after a two-hour session with Searcher sporting a ripped kite in conditions that had strengthened to over 20 knots in gusts.

ISORA celebrates its Golden Jubilee with a return to traditional Irish Offshore Racing in 2022 with the first fixture on May 28th with a 60-mile race from Dun Laoghaire to Holyhead. All this, of course, is preceded by DBSC's Spring Chicken Series that begins on February 6th. 

Published in ISORA

Mysterious maritime events that happened on Dublin Bay exactly 256 years ago are recounted for the first time in a new book about an extraordinary seafarer, Captain George Glass and his brave wife.

The saga involves piracy, mutiny, and murder - and the Muglins Rocks at the southern tip of the Bay.

A thrilling non-fiction tale from Ireland of maritime murder and mayhem. In 1765, the Glass family became involved in multiple murders on a British ship off the southeast coast of Ireland.

Taking readers from Scotland to Senegal and back to the quaint fishing town of Dalkey, the author Des Burke Kennedy works with original research and narrative flair to deliver this historical story, with 30 illustrations.

This high quality bound hardback book is printed on 90gm Munken stock, using an easy-to-read 11.5pt New Baskerville font

Available directly from the author here.

Murder, Mutiny & The Muglins

Published in Dublin Bay
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The interest in the GP14 Frostbite Series on Dublin Bay continued with seven taking to the water last Sunday morning for some very close and competitive races.

Curly Morris with Josh Porter upfront joined Sam Street and Josh Lloyd and Colman Grimes and Meg Tyrrell in making the journey to Sutton Dinghy Club.

Add in the home Clubs Hugh and Dan Gill, Peter and Stephen Boyle, Alan Blay and Hugh McNally and Kerri-Ann Boylan & David Johnston and the build-up to the World Championships for Irish crews had some cracking racing under PRO Jim Lambkin with Safety and Mark Laying managed by Club Commodore Ian McCormack.

Despite it being low water, the racing was underway by ten past 11 in 15kts of breeze. Before the end of the morning, it had reached 20kts with a few gusts to 26kts. Aside from a broken toe-strap on the Blessington boat and a visit to the drink for Kerri-Ann and David during a spinnaker gybe, two superbly competitive races were completed.

On the day Alan Blay/Hugh McNally won both races.

Race 1: Alan Blay (1), Peter Boyle (2), Colman Grimes (3), Hugh Gill (4), Sam Street (5), Curly Morris (6), Kerri-Ann (7)
Race 2: Alan Blay (1), Peter Boyle (2), Hugh Gill (3), Kerri-Ann (4), Colman Grimes (5), Curly Morris (6), Sam Street (7)

Racing continues this Sunday.

Published in GP14

John O'Gorman's Sunfast 3600 Hot Cookie from the National Yacht Club (on board footage from Prof O'Connell of North Sails below) is the overall leader of the mixed cruiser DBSC Turkey Shoot Series on Dublin Bay after four of seven races sailed. 

Another top DBSC campaigner, the Lindsay Casey skippered J/97 Windjammer, from the Royal St. George Yacht Club, is lying second in the 75 boat fleet on 87 points, 11 points behind the leader. 

Early series leader Joker II (John Maybury's J/109 of the Royal Irish Yacht Club) is lying third on 94 points.

Download results below as a pdf file.

Race five starts next Sunday at 10.10hrs.

Race Organiser Fintan Cairns reports a great atmosphere in the Royal Irish Yacht Club Wet Bar and the Terrace after racing, subject to COVID guidelines.

Published in Turkey Shoot

‘All In A Row 2021’ is coming back to the capital’s River Liffey on Saturday 11th December with a rowing challenge for the teams to smash a 1,000km target in eight hours. Forty skiffs, kayaks, canoes and currachs will all be on the water to raise funds for RNLI Lifeboats and the Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit.

The organisers are hoping to exceed last year’s target of rowing 1,000km during the event on the river, which will start from St. Patrick’s Rowing Club at the Tom Clarke Bridge (formerly the East Link Bridge) and go up to the Ha’penny Bridge. The challenge is being undertaken with the aim of showcasing the River Liffey as one of Dublin’s best amenities while raising funds for the water-related charities, RNLI Lifeboats and the Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit. The event raised €15,000 in 2019.

The event will start at 9 am on Saturday 11th December and at 1 pm all boats will gather on the Liffey at the Sean O’Casey footbridge. A wreath-laying ceremony, attended by the Lord Mayor of Dublin, will take place to commemorate all those who have lost their lives through drowning.

Lord Mayor of Dublin Alison Gilliland, who will be attending the event, said “The River Liffey is such an important part of the city of Dublin and it is wonderful to see so many people using and enjoying the river in a range of skiffs, kayaks, canoes and currachs. Best of luck to all those taking part and well done for rising to the challenge of rowing 1,000 km, showcasing our beautiful river and raising money for two great water-related charities, RNLI Lifeboats and the Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit.”

Many Dublin rowing clubs have their home on the River Liffey and are a regular sight on the water. At the port end of the river is St. Patrick’s Rowing Club, Stella Maris Rowing Club, East Wall Water Sports Group and Poolbeg Yacht and Boat club. Ringsend Basin is home to the Plurabelle Paddlers (dragon boats) and the Dublin Viking Dragon boats.

At the other end of the city beyond Heuston Station, there are many river rowing clubs and kayaking clubs, including Phoenix Rowing Club. Rowing clubs from other parts of Ireland will join in this challenge to raise funds for RNLI Lifeboats and the Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit.

Published in Dublin Bay
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The J/109 Dear Prudence is the overall leader of the mixed cruiser DBSC Turkey Shoot Series on Dublin Bay after three of seven races sailed. 

The 1720 sportsboat 'What did you Break?' that led until race two is now in sixth place at the Royal Irish Yacht Club hosted event.

Download results below as a pdf file.

Second is a former double winner of the Christmas Series – one of the biggest yachts in the fleet – theFirst 50, Mermaid IV that sailed home in third place last Sunday.

The Sunfast 3600 Hot Cookie is third overall. 

Race four starts next Sunday at 10.10hrs.

Published in Turkey Shoot
Tagged under

The 1720 sportsboat 'What did you Break?' is the overall leader of the mixed cruiser DBSC Turkey Shoot Series on Dublin Bay after two of seven races sailed. 

Download results below as a pdf file.

Second is the former GBR Commodore's Cupper, the First 40 Prima Forte, while another Turkey Shoot regular, the 1720 Optique, lies third overall.

Race three starts next Sunday at 10.10hrs.

Race Organiser Fintan Cairns reports a great atmosphere in the Royal Irish Yacht Club Wet Bar and the Terrace after racing, subject to COVID guidelines.

Published in Turkey Shoot
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The life and times of Dublin Bay and glimpses of its wildlife against the backdrop of the capital and major port is the theme of a new series beginning on TG4 this week.

Filmed over four seasons, An Cuan is narrated by Eoin Warner. The series is billed as “a celebration of the beauty of Dublin Bay and a timely reminder of the challenges and dangers that its natural habitat faces”.

With a population of almost 1.5 million, Dublin Bay is also home to one of the most important wildlife conservation projects on the island, the series points out.

The series describes how the brent goose is the “unofficial mascot” of the Dublin Bay Biosphere, finding an unlikely feeding ground in the port.

In the first episode, which begins with Spring, Bull Island and the seabird colonies of Howth are explored, while kitesurfers take to the water. However, environmental challenges, including one family’s battle to save its house from the “ever-encroaching” sea and the impact of gorse fires in Howth are also profiled.

A Dublin Bay sealA Dublin Bay seal

Special pontoons built for the local tern population among the cranes and berths of Dublin Port are filmed in the second episode, entitled Summer, when the bee orchid comes into bloom on Bull island.

The vintage Howth 17 fleet feature in the new TG4 SeriesThe vintage Howth 17 fleet feature in the new TG4 Series

The impact of human activity – on litter and in gorse fires – is also a theme, while Joyceans celebrate the special connection between Ulysses and Dublin Bay on Bloomsday, June 16th.

Autumn and winter seasons are captured in the final two episodes of the series, which was produced by Oddboy Media for TG4.

An Cuan is on TG4 from Wednesday November 10th at 9.30 pm

Published in Dublin Bay
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For sixty years and more, Carmel Winkelmann was a force of nature and a power for the good in sailing in Ireland, especially in Dublin Bay. While she gave generously of her time in all areas of interest, her speciality was the encouragement of young people into the sport, and the development of their talents. Her death in June of this year in her 93rd year marked the end of an era, and now it is time for the Final Watch, the scattering of her ashes on the waters of her beloved bay.

Tomorrow (Saturday 30th October) at 2.15 pm, a small flotilla led by the Winkelmann family will leave the Royal Irish YC heading for the Muglins, and accompanied by fellow sailors from Dublin Bay SC and the other Dun Laoghaire clubs with which Carmel was associated.

Communication will be on VHF 72 to co-ordinate a simple yet significant ceremony to mark the Final Watch for one of sailing’s truest and most enduring enthusiasts and pioneers.

Published in DBSC
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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