Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Northern Lighthouse Board

The Isle of Man Government's Department of Infrastructure wants to build a dolphin and footbridge in Douglas Harbour.

As Manx Radio reports, plans have been published to extend one of the harbour's piers used by ferry operator, the IOM Steam Packet Company.

The DoI has submitted a planning application for a marine dolphin and footbridge on King Edward VIII Pier.

The application says the scheme would include installing a mooring platform and bollard, as well as additional work not included in the plans as it would not need approval by the planning board.

The site is in a high-risk flood zone, but the department says it has not carried out a flood risk assessment as the structure will be founded in the seabed.

Published in Isle of Man

Dick Welsh has been appointed as the new Isle of Man Commissioner (Non-Executive Director) of the Northern Lighthouse Board, the General Lighthouse Authority responsible for Scotland and Manx waters.

Mr Welsh, who received an MBE in the January 2020 Honours List for services to the maritime community on the Isle of Man and Worldwide, will serve for a three-year term, from 1 June 2022 to 31 May 2025.

Mike Bullock, Chief Executive of the Northern Lighthouse Board said: “We are really looking forward to welcoming Dick to NLB. From a Merchant Navy Cadetship to a serving Engineer Officer and latterly as Director of the Isle of Man Ship Register, Dick’s impressive career at sea and in senior roles ashore means he will be a tremendous addition to our Board of Commissioners.

“This is a unique role which offers the opportunity to contribute to the strategic leadership and governance of NLB, in the delivery of a critical safety service to all mariners.”

Commenting on his appointment with NLB, Dick Welsh said: “I am incredibly fortunate to be appointed as Commissioner, Isle of Man for the Northern Lighthouse Board. I am really looking forward to getting involved and becoming a valuable member of the Board.

“I have had a long association with NLB lights. As a boy I spent summers at Langness where a family friend had been a keeper. This association went further when I dated a Langness keeper's daughter. When he was posted to Muckle Flugga, I spent 3 glorious weeks there one summer and visited the lighthouse. Even today I often spend time at Langness, Point of Ayre or fishing inside Chicken’s Rock.”

As a Commissioner, Mr Welsh will help provide non-executive leadership, challenge, oversight and support to the executive team through regular Board and committee meetings as well as participating in visits to NLB’s operational sites across Scotland and the Isle of Man.

The appointment will take effect from 1 June 2022.

Published in Isle of Man

The Northern Lighthouse Board which is responsible for the waters surrounding Scotland and the Isle of Man, has been named as a finalist in the Working Families Best Practice Awards.

The NLB has been shortlisted in the category Best for Mental Health & Wellbeing. The awards celebrate employers whose stand-out cultures and working practices are leading the way in flexible and employee-friendly workplaces.

Mike Bullock, Chief Executive of the Northern Lighthouse Board said: “It is a huge honour to have been shortlisted for this award. Our people are the most precious and important asset we have, and our aim is to provide a supportive and healthy working environment to allow every member of NLB’s team to thrive.”

The other finalists in the category are Arnold Clark and Santander.

The winners will be announced at an awards event at Vintner’s Hall in London on 8 June 2022, with the official event partner Bright Horizons Work+Family Solutions.

Published in Lighthouses

#PoleStar – Northern Lighthouse Board's aids to navigation tender NLB Pole Star which normally serves in Scottish waters and also has responsibility for the Isle of Man, made a brief call to Dun Laoghaire Harbour over the weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The presence of Pole Star in Irish waters is not unusual as on occasions, operations require the deployment of these specialist ships between the three General Lighthouse Authority (GLA).

The GLA are the Commissioners of Irish Lights, Northern Lighthouse Board and Trinity House which works in English and Walsh waters and those of the Channel Islands.

During Pole Star's overnight Friday-Saturday call to Dun Laoghaire, the harbour is where CIL are headquartered and is also the homeport of ILV Granuaile, which is understood to be at Cork Dockyard.

As Afloat.ie previously reported, she underwent last year a '15 year Special Survey Dry-docking' awarded to the Rushbrooke based facility that beat off stiff competition from other European yards.

At this stage, it is uncertain if the call to Cork (or for layover period?) was directly to do with the deployment of Pole Star. The vessel  departed the Dublin Bay harbour yesterday for Belfast Lough and today headed up the Firth of Clyde bound for Greenock.

Pole Star (2000/1,174grt) the smaller of the two NLB vessels, is otherwise an Oban based buoy-laying vessel which can also carry out hydrographic surveys.

Combined, the GLA's have a fleet of six ships in which CIL's ILV Granuaile built also in 2000, was the first in terms of ship design of the lighthouse umbrella organisation to have her working deck positioned aft. i.e. at the back of the ship where buoys are stowed to and from deployment.

At the time of Granuaile's introduction, this far improved design was followed suit by her GLA counterparts. However, Trinity House's THV Patricia, dating from 1982, remains as the sole survivor of the traditional forward located working deck arrangement between the superstructure and bow.

Notably, she is the only tender to accommodate paying-passengers (numbering 12) who can join the vessel as she carries out her routine duties.

Published in Lighthouses

Sailing was not the only activity that took place in Dublin Bay last Saturday as the Northern Lighthouse Board's (NLB) multi-function tender NLV Pharos was busy at work, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The NLB is the Scottish equivalent of the Commissioners of Irish Lights (CIL) and it is not unusual for such vessels to share work duties beyond their respective jurisdictions. The 84m NLV Pharos is equipped with dynamic positioning and a 30-tonne main crane on her 300m2 aft-deck.

Overall she is similar in appearance to Irish lights ILV Granuaile which is based out of Dun Laoghaire. The Irish Lights tender built in Romania in 2000 tends to operate more often off the west coast during the summer months due to the more favourable weather conditions.

The 1,300 (dwt) deadweight tonnes NLV Pharos yesterday returned to her base in Oban from her Irish duties. The west coast base was established in 1904 and is also homeport to the service's smaller NLV Pole Star which is equipped with an 18-tonne crane on her 90m2 aft deck.

The facility in 2000 underwent a £4.2 million redevelopment to turn a buoy yard into a multi functional support base which is computer-linked to the NLB headquarters in Edinburgh.

In addition Trinity House which maintains the service for England and Wales operate the tenders THV Galtea,THV Patricia and the fast-response craft THV Alert from their base in Harwich.

Trinity House forms the trio of the General Lighthouse Authorities (GLA) alongside NLB and CIL. Each member of the GLA co-operate in the allocation of vessel-tender deployment.

Asides the varied and critical role of the tasks performed by the GLA's tenders, they are also available for charter to third parties. Between them the tenders can conduct buoy and chain work, search and rescue, lighthouse re-fuelling, salvage and recovery, towing, hydrographic applications and ROV work.

Published in Lighthouses

Galway Port & Harbour

Galway Bay is a large bay on the west coast of Ireland, between County Galway in the province of Connacht to the north and the Burren in County Clare in the province of Munster to the south. Galway city and port is located on the northeast side of the bay. The bay is about 50 kilometres (31 miles) long and from 10 kilometres (6.2 miles) to 30 kilometres (19 miles) in breadth.

The Aran Islands are to the west across the entrance and there are numerous small islands within the bay.

Galway Port FAQs

Galway was founded in the 13th century by the de Burgo family, and became an important seaport with sailing ships bearing wine imports and exports of fish, hides and wool.

Not as old as previously thought. Galway bay was once a series of lagoons, known as Loch Lurgan, plied by people in log canoes. Ancient tree stumps exposed by storms in 2010 have been dated back about 7,500 years.

It is about 660,000 tonnes as it is a tidal port.

Capt Brian Sheridan, who succeeded his late father, Capt Frank Sheridan

The dock gates open approximately two hours before high water and close at high water subject to ship movements on each tide.

The typical ship sizes are in the region of 4,000 to 6,000 tonnes

Turbines for about 14 wind projects have been imported in recent years, but the tonnage of these cargoes is light. A European industry report calculates that each turbine generates €10 million in locally generated revenue during construction and logistics/transport.

Yes, Iceland has selected Galway as European landing location for international telecommunications cables. Farice, a company wholly owned by the Icelandic Government, currently owns and operates two submarine cables linking Iceland to Northern Europe.

It is "very much a live project", Harbourmaster Capt Sheridan says, and the Port of Galway board is "awaiting the outcome of a Bord Pleanála determination", he says.

90% of the scrap steel is exported to Spain with the balance being shipped to Portugal. Since the pandemic, scrap steel is shipped to the Liverpool where it is either transhipped to larger ships bound for China.

It might look like silage, but in fact, its bales domestic and municipal waste, exported to Denmark where the waste is incinerated, and the heat is used in district heating of homes and schools. It is called RDF or Refuse Derived Fuel and has been exported out of Galway since 2013.

The new ferry is arriving at Galway Bay onboard the cargo ship SVENJA. The vessel is currently on passage to Belem, Brazil before making her way across the Atlantic to Galway.

Two Volvo round world races have selected Galway for the prestigious yacht race route. Some 10,000 people welcomed the boats in during its first stopover in 2009, when a festival was marked by stunning weather. It was also selected for the race finish in 2012. The Volvo has changed its name and is now known as the "Ocean Race". Capt Sheridan says that once port expansion and the re-urbanisation of the docklands is complete, the port will welcome the "ocean race, Clipper race, Tall Ships race, Small Ships Regatta and maybe the America's Cup right into the city centre...".

The pandemic was the reason why Seafest did not go ahead in Cork in 2020. Galway will welcome Seafest back after it calls to Waterford and Limerick, thus having been to all the Port cities.

© Afloat 2020