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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
Victorine (above) which CLdN launched onto the first pure RoRo service between the Iberian Peninula (Santander, Spain) with the UK and Ireland in June has been joined by another freight-only ferry Clementine but on a new link from these ports to Leixoes in Portugal.
Freight-ferry operator CLdN and UK ports group, Peel Ports celebate the addition of a second ferry service linking the Iberian peninsula to Liverpool and Dublin Port. The new weekly service connecting Leixoes, Portugal to the UK and Irish ports, follows the…
Laser racing on Dublin Bay is part of a number of events cancelled in the capital
Some key end of summer Dublin sailing events have been cancelled with immediate effect this weekend as a result of the Government's level three restrictions announced this evening. The announcement led the country's largest yacht racing club, Dublin Bay Sailing Club,…
While her wardrobe is not yet complete, John B Kearney's 1925-built Mavis - restored by Ron Hawkins in Maine - has enough cloth available to take her first new steps under sail in September 2020
In this time of increasing uncertainty with its frustration of sailing plans, we find reassurance in soothing thoughts of well-restored or new-built classic boats. And traditional vessels in handsome and workmanlike order have the same heartening effect. We've an instinct…
With all of Dun Laoghaire Harbour to play with, and an unusual evening onshore breeze, the Water Wag fleet takes all the tactical options on Wednesday evening. Polly (31, Roger Mossop & Henry Rooke), Badger (20, John & Anne Marie Cox) and Ethna (1, David Sommervillle & Pauline McNamara) in foreground
With a turnout of 24 boats keen to enjoy the benefit of sunshine at sea while the mist gloomed over the land, the Dublin Bay Water Wags continued to push the truncated 2020 season to its limits on Wednesday evening.…
Royal St. George's J97 Windjammer is racing to the Kish lighthouse on Sunday
With entries close to 35 boats, the annual DMYC Kish Race has been made all the more interesting with some of top ISORA boats now entered for this Sunday's Race on Dublin Bay.  ISORA coastal regulars such as the Royal…
Ruffles was third in the Ruffian 23 race
132 boats across 20 classes turned out for Saturday's Dublin Bay Sailing Club Race.  In the big cruiser division, the First 40 Prima Forte was the IRC Zero winner from  XP 44 WOW and the Beneteau 44.7 Lively Lady.  IRC…
The Goodbody family of Dun Laoghaire have been remarkably successful in making the best of 2020's shortened season. On Thursday evening their J/109 White Mischief emerged as overall winner of Cruisers 1 in the DBSC Thursday Series under both IRC and ECHO, and they also were champion J/109. Meanwhile in August, Richard Goodbody and his 16-year-old son Max crewed aboard Chris & Patanne Power-Smith's J/122 Aurelia to take line honours and third overall in the Fastnet 450
Even Dublin Bay Sailing Club, with all its remarkable expertise and sheer firepower, has been unable to slow Planet Earth in its daily rotation, let alone alter the steady changing of our little solar satellite's endlessly shifting tilt as it…
Fishing for crab and lobster on Dublin Bay - Cultural heritage is associated with the sea, fishing and small-scale fleets
Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency, is to host a webinar on Wednesday 9th September 2020 at 2 pm on how the role of cultural values can be integrated more in small-scale fisheries management. The webinar, which will…
The start of ISORA's night race off Dun Laoghaire Harbour. See video below
ISORA Champion Rockabill VI was the overall winner of Friday's 40-mile night race. Although short on entries, the seven boat fleet was made up of the leading contenders for this year's Irish ISORA overall prize. It was the defending champion,…
The passenger ferryboat service to Dalkey Island in south Dublin Bay is not operating following the partial collapse of the cliff within Coliemore Harbour resulting in the closure of the harbour' s access walkway path to the ferry-pier and the Dalkey Rowing Club boathouse (also above) due to health and safety grounds. On the right can be seen the gap where a large rock became dislodged, dropped directly into the water below.
The popular Dalkey Island seasonal ferryboat has stopped service due to a partial collapse of a cliff-face underneath a footpath leading to the pier at Coliemore Harbour, Co. Dublin, writes Jehan Ashmore. The ferry operator, Ken Cunningham said "unfortunately due…
A moment of inspiration recalled at Sutton Dinghy Club's Junior Training – Annalise Murphy wins her Silver Medal in Rio, August 2016
Olympic Silver Medallist Annalise Murphy took a break from her training routine towards the 2021 Olympics this (Wednesday) morning when she hopped into her sponsored Mercedes SUV to see the successful COVID-compliant Junior set up put together by Hugh Gill…
Anglers perched on the rocks on the Dalkey coastline
For the second weekend running in August, anglers on the south shore of Dublin Bay have been taking a bountiful supply of mackerel on feathers, especially on the southern tip of the Bay at Dalkey Island where shoals of sprat…
What a Lump - On the dock at Dun Laoghaire Marina
Normally found in the cold waters of the Arctic, North Atlantic, and North Pacific ocean, this unusual-looking lumpsucker fish was discovered on the dock at Dun Laoghaire Marina on Dublin Bay this morning. "The Icelandic fish them for their eggs,…
Competitors in a previous Dun Laoghaire Harbour Swim
The 90th edition of the annual Dun Laoghaire Harbour Swim is scheduled for the morning of Sunday 16 August. The National Yacht Club’s notice requests that all harbour users keep clear of the swimmers on the day — this includes…
Stella a former Dutch canal-cargo barge in this file photo when initially the vessel was berthed at the pierhead of the Old Pier (dating to 1767) which as the name suggests is Dun Laoghaire Harbour's oldest. The barge subsequently was relocated to the adjacent Coal Harbour. Take a closer look above the West Pier were the funnel and upper superstructure of a Seatruck Ferries 'P' class ro-ro freighter is seen underway having departed neighbouring Dublin Port and when bound to Britain, either Heysham or Liverpool.
During a self-imposed 'semi' day-off which took place on this day last week, several small 'motor'-powered vessels were observed during a brief visit to the marina in Dun Laoghaire Harbour and environs, writes Jehan Ashmore. It was in Dun Laoghaire…
Developers Bartra Property Group proposed to build three 3-story luxury villas and two apartments as well as a cafe on the site at Bulloch Harbour (above) in AFLOAT's file photo is a closer-up view compared to Dublin Live's coverage. On right colourful timber-built fishing related huts and the former boat-hoist crane since dismantled. In the background TUI Cruises Mein Schiff 1 while at anchor off Dun Laoghaire Harbour which was scheduled this year to receive a record 22 calls but due to Covid-19 fallout, only two cruiseship calls are expected this season.
In south Dublin Bay campaigners against a luxury development at Bulloch Harbour, Dalkey have been celebrating after planning permission for the controversial coastal mansions was quashed last week. An Bord Pleanala has conceded the judicial review brought by the association,…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

 

Dublin Bay Webcam

Dublin (North Wall) Tide Times

Marine Traffic

Wind Forecast