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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
DBSC Committee vessels (pictured) will run in a pod system and all participants should also ensure their boats are organised in pods
Long-awaited race 'training' gets underway on Dublin Bay in ten days time thanks to Dublin Bay Sailing Club that has announced a May Mini-Series this evening. In line with government guidelines, DBSC will run a Mini-Series this month in order…
Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI inshore lifeboat
Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI rescued a paddleboarder who got into difficulty after he could not get back to shore on Bank Holiday Monday evening. The lifeboat crew were paged following a report made to the Irish Coast Guard by a…
Cormac Devlin TD (left) and Councillor Justin Moylan at Coliemore Harbour on Dublin Bay which has been allocated €100,000 to repair the harbour following rockfall damage
Dublin harbours are set to receive over €8.4m in funding for harbours in Fingal (Loughshinny Harbour, Skerries and Balbriggan Harbours) with Howth Harbour receiving €8.2m for specific improvements and two harbours in Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council (Dún Laoghaire Harbour and…
The May Bank Holiday saw the return of excursion cruises on Dublin Bay linking the harbours of Dun Laoghaire and Howth (as above with St. Bridget). In addition cruises involve around Dalkey Island and Ireland's Eye (also above).All of the 9 cruise options remains with passenger Covid19 restrictions in place.
The May Bank Holiday weekend finally marked a particularly eagerly awaited return of Dublin Bay Cruises, following Covid19's dramatic impact on last year's reduced season, writes Jehan Ashmore. Normally the season starts during the St. Patrick's Festival and so the…
385 boats to date had entered for July's now-cancelled Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta
July’s Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021 has been cancelled due to the ongoing "uncertainties" over the Covid-19 pandemic. The scrubbing of Ireland's biggest regatta, scheduled for the first two weekends of July, comes after careful consideration of the latest government…
The Irish Nautical Trust may have been functioning for years, but Jimmy Murray's enthusiasm is unabated
Jimmy Murray, Director of the Irish Nautical Trust in Dublin, is our "Sailor of the Month" for April in the Environmental category for the key role he played in the commissioning of the purpose-built Liffey Sweeper, which appropriately made its…
Guy O’Leary, who underwent a year of cancer treatment is challenging himself again to swim a mile each day during the month of May
Dun Laoghaire Harbour sailor Guy O'Leary is repeating last year's swim for charity endeavour this morning when he swims a mile each day during the month of May to raise funds for Cancer charities. Like last year, he will be…
Howth RNLI rescue kite-surfer in difficulty
Howth RNLI was on exercise this afternoon Saturday 24th April when it received a call to join the Irish Coast Guard Helicopter Rescue 116 who were tasked to locate a kite-surfer who had got into difficulty off Sutton Strand in…
Colourful RS dinghies from Dun Laoghaire Harbour out for a sail in perfect sailing conditions on Dublin Bay
Boating activity returned to Dun Laoghaire Harbour yesterday on Dublin Bay as fine April weather ushered in the start (officially or unofficially) of the 2021 boating season with a range of sailing and boating underway at the country's biggest boating…
A plinth is in place ready for the statue of Roger Casement to arrive on site at the Dun Laoghaire Baths on Dublin Bay
Despite the stop-start nature of construction due to COVID-19 restrictions, shoreward photography taken at the weekend of the new Dun Laoghaire Baths shows that significant progress has been made in all areas of the flagship project for Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council.…
The latest Jeanneau Merry Fisher Marlin 605 on display at Dun Laoghaire Marina
Go ahead Dublin yacht and boat broker MGM Boats are busy in their homeport of Dun Laoghaire Harbour displaying the latest Jeanneau Merry Fisher Marlin 605 for the 2021 boating season. The proudly displayed new French marque is turning heads from…
Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta has received 94 entries so far for the Open Cruiser Championship (8th – 11th July 2021) on Dublin Bay
Entries for Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta (VDLR) are beyond expectations for July's event giving organisers the opportunity to close the entry system at the end of April to review the 320 boats received so far. Ireland's biggest regatta on Dublin…
Irish Nautical Trust has launched the “Liffey Sweeper
The Irish Nautical Trust has launched the “Liffey Sweeper”, a new environmental vessel designed to collect large amounts of non-natural debris such as plastic, cans and bottles from the city’s waterways. The newest addition to Dublin’s nautical fleet is part…
Dublin and its Bay – national capital, port city, natural wonder, internationally designated biosphere, maritime highway, nautical playground, cultural icon - and much else.
Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association invites you to join their next Zoom session on Dublin Bay Nature, which will be given by Richard Nairn on Thursday, 22nd April at 20:00 hrs. Dublin Bay is one of the most intensively studied…
File image of Dun Laoghaire Marina, which is currently turning down requests from yachts seeking to come in from abroad
Anyone wishing to bring a yacht into an Irish port from abroad will have to wait a little longer as the official line remains “essential travel only”. Despite last week’s slight relaxation of movement restrictions within Ireland — with people…
Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite data showing Ringsend waste Water Treatment Plant on the 10th October 2020, one of the days Irish water reported over 75,000 m3 of storm runoff at Ringsend
The environmental action group, SOS Dublin Bay, has today launched a detailed policy document entitled - “The water quality crisis in Dublin Bay - what is happening and actions needed to protect the public”. Download the full documents and survey…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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