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Arklow Rose Takes to the Waters With Splash and Spectacle for Dutch Onlookers

26th April 2024
Click click click… Arklow Rose this morning was a sight to behold as locals of a shipyard in the Netherlands watched as the smart green hulled newbuild took to the waters with a resultant splash! This is the sixth of seven ships built by Royal Bodewes to their Eco-Trader 6,800 dwt series of dry-bulk cargo ships.
Click click click… Arklow Rose this morning was a sight to behold as locals of a shipyard in the Netherlands watched as the smart green hulled newbuild took to the waters with a resultant splash! This is the sixth of seven ships built by Royal Bodewes to their Eco-Trader 6,800 dwt series of dry-bulk cargo ships. Credit: Jonny van der Tuuk – RoyalBodewes-facebook

Despite grey clouds, the sun was out too during the launch of Arklow Rose this morning, which was a spectacle that the locals of a Dutch shipyard clearly enjoyed watching, writes Jehan Ashmore.

A blast from the Royal Bodewes shipyard launched the ship transversely into the waterway, generating consequential wash, which saw tugs fore and aft bob about. All this adds to the drama.

Arklow Rose is now the penultimate of seven 6,800 deadweight (dwt) tons (‘R’ class) to enter the waterway at the shipyard in Martenshoek. Like the rest of the series, it has a cargo hold capacity of 310.000 cubic feet and a service speed of 11 knots.

The 105-metre-long overall (LOA) vessel built for Arklow Shipping Ltd., marks another proud day for the Irish Ship Registrar, with the dry bulk cargo ship showing at its stern the east coast shipowner's homeport.

Also, at the stern (starboard quarter), can be seen the support frame structure where the free-fall lifeboat will occupy its cradle position.

This latest launch follows Arklow Resolve, which took place in January, and sea trials in the North Sea, which occurred in March, necessitating a tow of the newbuild from the inland yard to the Ems Estuary.

Arklow Rose takes its name from a previous vessel, which represented the first of 16 short-sea traders built from 2002. Likewise, the newbuilds were all Dutch-built but from the yard of Barkmeijer Strooboos. As Afloat reported, only two such ships of this series remain in service.

During the video(s) footage of Arklow Rose, when it pans to the left, note that in the bottom corner there is a superstructure showing the bridge and a funnel (on its side) with the ASL crest clearly visible. 

This is invariably the final Eco-Trader of this series, which Afloat shall look forward to featuring. 

Published in Arklow Shipping
Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

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Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

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About Arklow Shipping

Arklow Shipping Limited, one of Ireland's leading shipping companies, has marked over 50 years of operation following its establishment in 1966.

The company, which began with a fleet of seven ships, has grown steadily over the years and now boasts a fleet of 59 vessels.

The company was founded by Captains James Tyrrell, Michael Tyrrell, and Victor Hall, who collaborated to create an umbrella company to operate their ships. This move allowed them to reduce overheads and strengthen their position in the market. The original fleet comprised seven ships, namely Tyrronall, Murell, Marizell, Valzell, Kilbride, River Avoca, and Avondale, all of varying sizes.

The shipping industry in Ireland underwent a significant transformation in the 1960s, with the replacement of traditional auxiliary schooners with modern crafts.

Arklow Shipping was at the forefront of this change, and the founders recognized the need for a new approach to shipping in Ireland. They built a company that could adapt to the changing market demands, and this has been a key factor in the company's continued growth.

Over the years, Arklow Shipping has bought, sold, and built ships, facing the challenges and opportunities that come with operating in the shipping industry. Despite these challenges, the company has remained committed to meeting market demand and providing high-quality services to its clients.

Today, Arklow Shipping is a leading player in the shipping industry, with a strong reputation for reliability and professionalism. The company's success story is a testament to the vision and dedication of its founders, who laid the foundation for a company that has stood the test of time.

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