Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

UK's Second Largest Ports Group Calls for Supply-Chain Rethink Across Country's Port Network

18th October 2021
Peel Ports Group, the UK’s second largest port group, calls for the supply-chain to take a rethink by improving logistics in the better use of the nation's port network. The group consists of Liverpool, Heysham, Manchester Ship Canal (above), Medway (Sheerness / Chatham), Clydeport and Great Yarmouth. In addition, to operating the MTL Terminal in Dublin Port and owns BG Freight Line, a provider of short sea container services between the UK, Ireland and mainland Europe and feeder services between UK and Ireland. Peel Ports Group, the UK’s second largest port group, calls for the supply-chain to take a rethink by improving logistics in the better use of the nation's port network. The group consists of Liverpool, Heysham, Manchester Ship Canal (above), Medway (Sheerness / Chatham), Clydeport and Great Yarmouth. In addition, to operating the MTL Terminal in Dublin Port and owns BG Freight Line, a provider of short sea container services between the UK, Ireland and mainland Europe and feeder services between UK and Ireland. Credit: Peel Ports-twitter

In the UK, the second-largest port operator is calling for the supply chain to rethink its approach by making better use of the entire port network across the country.

Peel Ports says that it is essential for logistics firms and cargo owners to take advantage of the full range of private, public and trust ports all along the UK’s coastline, helping to address problems caused by trade bottlenecks in the South-East.

According to Maritime UK, the UK ports industry handles 95% of UK import and export by volume. Despite the large number of ports in the UK, much of the freight traffic is concentrated among a comparatively small percentage, with the top 20 ports accounting for 88% of the total.

Local logistics could sort supply chain woes

  • UK’s network of 120 commercial ports is under-utilised
  • Bottlenecks in a small number of major ports are harming UK plc
  • Commerce as a whole will gain from spreading the load

David Huck, Managing Director of Group Ports at Peel Ports, said: “It might raise eyebrows that we’re encouraging companies to use competitors as well as ourselves, but these are exceptional times. Brexit, Covid and the long-standing HGV driver shortage are all combining to challenge the supply chain like never before.

“Congestion in southern ports has long been an issue and there has traditionally been a huge reliance on the south to facilitate the UK’s supply chain. Currently 95% of goods enter the country via the south, yet 60% is actually destined for the north. We have long argued the UK is too reliant on the South-East and the current climate calls for a serious rethink on the future of alternative regional ports being used as points of entry and exit.”

“The UK has excellent coverage throughout the country of ports for every size vessel and every commodity. We need to take full advantage of this by moving goods by sea as much as possible and doing so closest to their point of origin or their destination. That will reduce the pressure in congested areas and allow us to better use both the supply of haulage services and the road network. That is in everyone’s interests.”

Peel Ports has invested around £1.2 billion worth of infrastructure into its ports across UK and Ireland (MTL Terminal, Dublin Port with caller BG Freight Line), to prepare for increased demand and pressures on the supply chain. Investments include the L2 container terminal in Liverpool, Brexit contingencies for HGV trailers, new rail connections to major UK city hubs and a heavy recruitment campaign to increase labour.

This investment has helped to attract more services to Peel Ports’ facilities. Following a successful trial earlier this year, DKT Allseas announced that its China Xpress liner service will become a permanent route into Liverpool, complimented with the introduction of a new onward rail service into Freightliners Birmingham terminal.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

Email The Author

Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

We've got a favour to ask

More people are reading Afloat.ie than ever thanks to the power of the internet but we're in stormy seas because advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. Unlike many news sites, we haven’t put up a paywall because we want to keep our marine journalism open.

Afloat.ie is Ireland's only full–time marine journalism team and it takes time, money and hard work to produce our content.

So you can see why we need to ask for your help.

If everyone chipped in, we can enhance our coverage and our future would be more secure. You can help us through a small donation. Thank you.

Direct Donation to Afloat button

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating