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#ISLAND NEWS - Cork County Council has set up a working group to examine the future of the Dursey Island Cable Car.
The group, established with the objective of securing the future sustainable operation of Ireland's only cable car – and the only sea-going cable car in Europe - had its first meeting on Friday 4 November.
The cable car between Dursey Island and Ballaghboy on the mainland is the main method of access to the island. It operates year round, weather permitting.
Featured in the working group are residents of the island and the local farming community, Comhar na nOileán, the Islands Division of the Department of Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht Affairs, Fáilte Ireland, the Bere Island Projects group, West Cork Development Partnership and other island representation.
Cork County Council recently commissioned an expert engineering report on the Dursey Island Cable Car, which the group is now working from.
Take a trip on the Dursey Island Cable Car courtesy of YouTube:

#ISLAND NEWS - Cork County Council has set up a working group to examine the future of the Dursey Island Cable Car.

The group, established with the objective of securing the future sustainable operation of Ireland's only cable car – and the only sea-going cable car in Europe - had its first meeting on Friday 4 November.

The cable car between Dursey Island and Ballaghboy on the mainland is the main method of access to the island. It operates year round, weather permitting.

Featured in the working group are residents of the island and the local farming community, Comhar na nOileán, the Islands Division of the Department of Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht Affairs, Fáilte Ireland, the Bere Island Projects group, West Cork Development Partnership and other island representation.

Cork County Council recently commissioned an expert engineering report on the Dursey Island Cable Car, which the group is now working from.

Take a trip on the Dursey Island Cable Car courtesy of YouTube:

Published in Island News
#CORK HARBOUR - A never-before-seen collection of images and memorabilia from Cork celebrating the harbour city and its heritage has just been published, the Cork Independent reports.
Pure Cork features photos, postcards, maps and other items collected by Blarney Street native Michael Lenihan over the last 40 years, and he claims that "95 per cent" of them have never been seen before.
The selection represents just a fraction of the more than 2,000 postcards and countless photographs in Lenihan's collection.
From paddle steamer boats in the famous harbour to the landing of the first plane at Cork Airport in the 1960s, the changing face of transport in the city is also documented.
Pure Cork is available in bookshops across Cork, priced at €25. An exhibition of original photos from Lenihan's collection is also on display at Liam O'Shea's Bookshop on Oliver Plunkett Street.
The Cork Independent has more on the story HERE.

#CORK HARBOUR - A never-before-seen collection of images and memorabilia from Cork celebrating the harbour city and its heritage has just been published, the Cork Independent reports.

Pure Cork features photos, postcards, maps and other items collected by Blarney Street native Michael Lenihan over the last 40 years, and he claims that "95 per cent" of them have never been seen before.

The selection represents just a fraction of the more than 2,000 postcards and countless photographs in Lenihan's collection.

From paddle steamer boats in the famous harbour to the landing of the first plane at Cork Airport in the 1960s, the changing face of transport in the city is also documented.

Pure Cork is available in bookshops across Cork, priced at €25. An exhibition of original photos from Lenihan's collection is also on display at Liam O'Shea's Bookshop on Oliver Plunkett Street.

The Cork Independent has more on the story HERE.

Published in Cork Harbour
Recognising that Cork's long and varied coastline is one of its greatest assets, the Mayor of Cork County, Councillor Kevin Murphy, and the County Manager, Martin Riordan, launched two major reports on Cork's coastal areas earlier this Summer; a Marine Leisure Strategy for South Cork, and a Draft Study of Cork Harbour.

The Marine Leisure Infrastructure Strategy for South Cork, 2010-2020 is a document that has paved the way for additional marine leisure facilties to get established in the harbour namely the recently installed Cork Harbour marina at Monkstown.

Councillor Kevin Murphy said that, following completion of the Marine Leisure Strategy for South Cork, survey information on marine leisure infrastructure and activities is now available for the entire coastline of Cork. In 2008 Cork County Council and the Coastal and Marine Research Centre (CMRC), UCC, produced A Marine Leisure Infrastructure Strategy for West Cork, covering the coast from the Kerry border to Courtmacsherry (700km). In 2010, they completed the picture, with the South Cork Strategy covering another 500km of coastal inlets, bays, beaches and harbours, from Timoleague to Youghal. This involved auditing the coastal infrastructure and assessing the current offering in relation to tourism and leisure. As a result, Cork is uniquely placed to take advantage of the marine leisure opportunities offered by its coast.

There is an extensive legacy of marine infrastructure all along the coast of Ireland, from the heyday of the 20th century fishing industry. The 21st century brought a change in how much of this marine infrastructure was used, so that in certain areas it became less critical to livelihoods. The motive behind the 2008 Strategy was to use these resources, re-assess their value and tap into the potential of marine infrastructure to develop sustainable products, services and jobs, as well as encourage investment along the coast.

Preparatory research for the Marine Leisure Infrastructure Strategy for the Southern Division of Cork County Council included asking over 100 stakeholder organisations to submit suggestions on the future development of marine infrastructure and recreation on the South Cork coast. The responses from people directly involved in marine leisure and tourism at local level have informed the development of this Strategy, and will help promote future use of Cork's coast as part of a sustainable tourism product.

The Marine Leisure Strategy is an Action Plan for the coast, developed with inputs from these stakeholder organisations and a Steering Group with representatives from Cork County Council, CMRC, Fáilte Ireland, the ports of Kinsale, Cork and Youghal, the Town Councils of Kinsale, Cobh and Youghal, funding partnership groups (South and East Cork Area Development and West Cork Development Partnership) and Inland Fisheries Ireland. It identifies the untapped potential of the coast, contains extensive information on marine leisure activities and infrastructure, and outlines the next steps key to creating a top class coastal tourism and leisure product for County Cork.

Draft Cork Harbour Study

The Draft Cork Harbour Study looks at the most intensively used part of the South Cork coastline, on a broader and longer term basis, which includes the other activities on Cork Harbour as well as marine leisure, and looks forward up to the middle of the 21st century.

Cork harbour is one of the largest in the world, but the range, scale and importance of its functions is also exceptional - as a major port, as the setting for Cork City, most of its satellite towns and the main energy and pharmaceutical industry clusters in the State, as an over-wintering site for birds area, as a centre for boating and fishing, and as the country's main naval base, both currently and historically, with the historical aspect represented by an exceptional coastal defence heritage. All of this happens in a Harbour in which agriculture and forestry still account for more than half the land within O.5 kilometres of the shoreline.

However, this balance will not maintain itself. The proportion of land adjoining the Harbour which was developed rose from around one ninth in the 1930s to around one third now, and on a trend basis will be around two-thirds in the 2050s. This trend is not sustainable in the longer term, and the Draft Study seeks a shift in approach. More development can occur on disused or underused Harbour side industrial land, for port uses and dockland type re-development, and perhaps also for new industries such as wave power devices, which may be a thousand tons each, and need to be built beside deep water and launched like a ship. Greenfield land adjoining the Harbour should not be developed for uses that have no strong reason for being there. In practice, a balance between the development and amenity roles of the Harbour is only likely to be maintained if there is public support for this. Greater use and better public access to its amenities and recreational facilities will make this more likely.

The Study tries to understand what is happening in Cork Harbour and where it might lead, partly through analysis of around 60 shoreline areas. It is often clearest at this level how different activities interact with the inherited landscape and each other, where potentially dynamic activities offer new opportunities, and where there are tensions to be resolved. Characteristic features of Cork Harbour - such as the position of many settlements on steep slopes with their centres on narrow level areas between the base of the hill and the sea, and the concentration of transport corridors close to the shoreline - become obvious as they recur in numerous local areas

As well as having numerous different activities, Cork Harbour also has numerous organisations involved in its management and development - public, private and community based. There is growing recognition of the importance of an integrated approach to coastal areas, and Cork County Council has been a partner with other local organisations in the COREPOINT and IMCORE projects (supported by the EU INTERREG programme), and is represented on the Cork Harbour Management Focus Group. A general framework to support a more integrated approach thus already exists.

However, the Harbour will change as a result of specific choices made in particular places, and the ultimate test of an integrated approach is whether it has practical influence at that level. Cork County Council has produced a Draft Study outlining possibilities, not a Plan saying what should definitely happen next, to promote discussion of options, in the hope that a greater degree of consensus will emerge at this more practical level.

The County Manager said that it was important that Harbour residents, businesses, community and recreational groups are part of these discussions, as well as public agencies with a responsibility in the Harbour area. The Draft Study will be on public display until 15th July, in Libraries and Council Offices, and under Planning on the Council's website. Cork County Council would welcome comments from all concerned during the next seven weeks.

All our latest Cork Harbour updates here

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under

#JOBS – Royal Cork Yacht Club (RCYC) is recruiting an Administrator on a fixed term contract for its Cork Week 2012 regatta. 

Cork Week, a major biennial event, the next hosting of which will take place from the 7th July 2012 - 13th July 2012.

Reporting to the Club Manager, RCYC says the role is an exciting opportunity for a person with proven administrative and organisational skills.

The person appointed will have a high level of computer literacy, a knowledge of website management and a familiarity with the world of sailing. The person must be able to demonstrate strong interpersonal abilities and use of initiative in dealing with Members, event competitors, sponsors, suppliers and the general public.

Please send application and CV (by email only) to [email protected]

Closing Date for receipt of applications is 25th November, 2011

Published in Jobs
#RESCUE - A fisherman on a Spanish vessel is in hospital after being airlifted from some 150 nautical miles southwest of Co Cork early yesterday, The Irish Times reports.
The skipper of the fishing vessel Albelo Primero radioed the Irish Coast Guard's Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre on Wednesday night, reporting that a 33-year-old crewman had taken ill and required emergency medical attention.
The man was airlifted by coastguard helicopter to Cork Airport and transfered by ambulance to Cork University Hospital.
The Irish Times said his condition is not understood to be life-threatening.
#RESCUE - A fisherman on a Spanish vessel is in hospital after being airlifted from some 150 nautical miles southwest of Co Cork early yesterday, The Irish Times reports.

The skipper of the fishing vessel Albelo Primero radioed the Irish Coast Guard's Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre on Wednesday night, reporting that a 33-year-old crewman had taken ill and required emergency medical attention.

The man was airlifted by coastguard helicopter to Cork Airport and transfered by ambulance to Cork University Hospital.

The Irish Times said his condition is not understood to be life-threatening.
Published in Rescue

#ROYAL CORK – With only two points between Jump Juice (Kerr 37) and Gloves Off (Corby 38) going into the final race of the O'Flynn Exhams Autumn Regatta at Royal Cork YC last weekend, it was all to play for in Cork Harbour. Videographer Brian Carlin jumped from Gloves to Jump to capture the action of the top 2 custom boats in IRC 0 class for the last show down of the 2011 season...

Published in Royal Cork YC
Tagged under

#JOBS – Cork County Council have issued a notice of intention to grant planning permission to allow the expansion of Cork Harbour Marina, Monkstown to a larger and more comprehensive 285 fingered berth marina as reported previously on Afloat.ie. The expansion will allow for 175 car parking spaces, a marina pavillion building to incorporate a provisions shop, cafe/bar/restaurant, chandlery, marine and boat sales office, Gym, changing rooms with showers, toilets and laundry facilities. All 285 berths are fully serviced, secure fingered berths ranging in size of up to 18m in length, a reception berth, a fuelling berth with diesel and petrol available and a pump out facility berth. The car park and pavillion will be encompassed by a public promenade with seating, panoramic viewing platform, viewing deck promontory and a nature awareness garden.

corkharbourmarina

An artist's impression of plans for an expanded marina at Monkstown

This expansion will lead to one of Ireland's finest marinas facilities which will support up to 90 jobs both directly and indirectly, of these 32 will be full time permanent jobs on the completed Marina complex. The Marina is a unique development, destined to be the South of Ireland's first Blue Flag marina with world-class facilities for berth holders and visitors alike which will allow Cork to capture a bigger slice of the world marine leisure market worth approx €928 billion annually. Initially, set up to address the deficit of safe berths in the Monkstown Bay area the facility is a credit to the Irish team that invested, designed and built it, and of their ambitious plans for its expansion to a five star facility to rival any that Europe has to offer.

A €1.5 million investment into the Irish economy was required to complete the first phase, namely an 82 berth state of the art floating concrete marina. Project co-coordinator James O'Brien advised that "having secured a grant from SECAD (South and East Cork Area Development) and private investment, Monkstown Bay Marina Company proceeded with the totally Irish construction project. All local contractors were employed, from engineering to carpentry to provision of water supplies, to mooring and anchoring specialist teams".

When questioned if he felt that it was wise to undertake such a project during a recession, Mr O'Brien felt that the project will actually help Cork recover from the recession, "In recent years, the lack of marina and berthing facilities in Cork Harbour, the second biggest natural Harbour in the world has been recognised as having a negative impact on the amount of yachts and marine leisure holidaymakers visiting the harbour, and utilising onshore facilities, both in the in the immediate locality and Cork County". Located just 7kms from Ringaskiddy Ferry Port, with access to the UK several times a week and Roscoff in France once a week. A weekly service to Spain is also under negotation, at this time making Cork Harbour Marina the ideal place to winter a visiting boat or to place it in Ireland for multiple family visits, and with the world class cruising grounds of West Cork.

Having a slip (or berth) at a marina offers convenience, security, services, amenities, and a social atmosphere to enjoy. There are broader quality of life benefits for users also, such as improved safety, to-and-from access, and the availability of other essential services, such as electricity to effect repairs, fuel at a convenient marina location, or provisions, parts or repairs being delivered directly to any boat as necessary. Berth spaces are currently available to rent long and short term, at competitive costs.

The boating public have eagerly awaited the new marina for many years, and the response has been one of huge endorsement and positivity, with rapid take-up of berths, and a high incidence of short stay and overnighting too, all bringing much needed tourism revenue to a village that most, up to now, would have sailed or motored past!

Cork Harbour Marina offers an asset-backed; Bord Failte approved BES scheme, in one of the only tax shelters left available to the Irish investor. Full details of this BES scheme are available on request. Berths are allocated on a first come first served basis, all enquiries regarding berthing space should be directed to James O'Brien on 087 3669009

Monkstown is an attractive seaside village that offers visitors beautiful walks in a stunning location - even walking the marina, visitors can enjoy this tranquil and picturesque harbour setting.

South of the city, the marina is also served by a regular bus route, No 223, allowing easy access to Cork City's shopping and social scenes, one of the top cities in the world for a short break, according to a recent Trailfinder survey. Cork Harbour Marina is also only 2kms from the Cross River Ferry, giving easy access to Great Island and East Cork.

For those choosing to stay for an extended period, various ancillary services can be organised - provisioning, refuelling, cleaning, antifouling, boat maintenance and repairs, sail repair, and winter storage both outdoor and covered. The marina team can also organise a boat delivery or recovery service provided by competent Offshore Yacht masters.

Cork Harbour marina is the closest marina to the suburbs of Douglas, Rochestown and Passage West, nestles right in front of the stunning Monkstown village, is convenient to Monkstown Sailing, Rowing, Golf and Tennis Clubs, and the world renowned Bosun Restaurant and Guesthouse, the convivial Monkstown Inn, and the proposed Monkstown Amenity Park, which the local communities are pushing toward completion.

In brief, Cork Harbour Marina is Ireland's newest coastal marina with all year round berthage. The marina itself can accommodate boats up to 17m and consists of an outer perimeter of floating concrete break waters with fingered berths contained internally.


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Published in Irish Marinas
1st November 2011

Paul Kingston

#RIP – Warm tributes have been paid to Cork Yacht Broker Paul Kingston (53), formerly of Kilmacsimon boatyard, who died unexpectedly at the weekend. A one time Irish Marine Federation (IMF) board member the news of his death has shocked both the local Cork boating community and his boating friends round the coast of Ireland. Paul ran a long established boat yard and brokerage business in the area first set-up in the 1970s by his father George.

Paul_Kingston

Yacht Broker Paul Kingston. Photo: David O'Brien

A member of Kinsale Yacht Club, Paul was a keen Dragon keelboat sailor and a motorcycle enthusiast. He was a big supporter of the Irish Boat Shows and a popular marine industry figure along the south coast.

Funeral details as follows:

Lying in repose at the Temple Hill Funeral Home, Boreenmanna Road of Jerh O'Connor Ltd from tomorrow, Thursday. Removal at 7pm (same evening) to the Church of Christ the King, Turners Cross, Cork. Requiem Mass on Friday at 11am.  Funeral afterwards to St Catherine's Cemetery, Kilcully.

Published in News Update

Phase one of a planned 300-berth marina facility in Monkstown Co. Cork, aptly named 'Cork Harbour Marina', is Ireland's newest coastal marina and is offering all year round berthing facilities for pleasure craft.

The new addition to the seaside village is in a sheltered location on the western bank of the River Lee in an area very popular for boating activities.

Monkstown marina

The new marina at Monkstown in Cork harbour

Accordng to the marina website a grant secured from SECAD (South East Area Development) assisted in the development of the marina and it is claimed the new facility will allow a wider range of people to get afloat in Cork Harbour, the second biggest natural harbour in the world.

Annual and long-term lets are now being taken.

Plans include promoting sailing in the area to older people, people with disabilities and for some less active men and women to get involved on the basis 'it is far easier and safer for such sailors to access their boats from a pontoon than a swinging mooring', the marina website says.

The new facility can accomodate boats up to 17m and consists of an outer perimeter of floating concrete break waters with fingered berths contained internally.

The 'Cork Harbour marina' web site is here.

Published in Irish Marinas
Two Royal Cork sailors stormed to the top of this morning's opening rounds of the Waterways Ireland All Ireland Sailing Championships. ICRA chsampion George Kenefick scored 1,1,2 to finsh top of the group with 1720 sportsboat Mark Mansfield in second on 5 points. They both now progress to the finals and will be joined by Ballyholme's Adrian Allen and Howth's SB3 champ Ben Duncan, the first four sailors into tomorrow's shoot-out for the title of All Ireland sailing champion.

Racing is taking place in flight two this afternoon in gusty 12 knot winds under race officer Geoff O'Donoghue of Lough Derg Yacht Club.

All three Dun Laoghaire helms competing in this morning's first flight were eliminated. Missing the cut by a single point are Mermaid champion Roger Bannon, David Gorman of the Flying fifteens and Alan Claffey of the Ruffians. Also going home is Donegal GP14 Champion John McGuinness.

Flight 1 Results

Flight

Boat

Name

R1

R2

R3

Total

1

7

George Kenefick

1

1

2

4

1

1

Mark Mansfield

2

2

1

5

1

2

Adrian Allen

8

3

3

14

1

6

Ben Duncan

4

6

4

14

1

5

Roger Bannon

5

5

5

15

1

3

Alan Claffey

6

4

6

16

1

8

David Gorman

3

7

7

17

1

4

John McGuinness

7

8

8

23


Results of the second flight later.
Published in All Irelands
Page 15 of 25

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