Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Crosshaven

Two back-to-back shouts on Thursday evening (4 August) for the volunteers of Crosshaven RNLI lifeboat in Cork Harbour.

The first tasking came at 4.15 pm and the crew launched to a report of a ‘raft” with persons onboard drifting between Spike Island and the Whitegate oil refinery.

The crew of Warren Forbes, Norman Jackson, Claire Morgan and Derek Moynan made best speed to the area before conducting a sector search of the area. After a period searching with nothing found, the Coast Guard stood down the lifeboat to return to station. The call was deemed a false alarm with good intent.

30 minutes after putting the lifeboat “to bed”, Valentia Coast Guard once again activated the pagers at 6.20pm to proceed to an angling boat with 4 adults and 2 children on board in the Graball Bay area of The Sound.

The track of  the busy Crosshaven RNLI lifeboat in Cork HarbourThe track of the busy Crosshaven RNLI lifeboat in Cork Harbour

An adult male on the vessel was having a medical episode. The lifeboat crew of Alan Venner, Jonny Bermingham and Claire Morgan were soon alongside. Claire transferred to the casualty vessel and administered casualty care whilst both vessels proceeded to Crosshaven where the casualty was handed into the care of the National Ambulance Service.

Shore crew on these taskings were, Hugh Mockler, Aidan O’Connor, Warren Forbes, Jon Meany, Jonny Bermingham and Michael McCann (DLA).

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Shortly after launching on exercise this evening, Valentia Coast Guard tasked the volunteer RNLI crew at 7.15 pm to proceed to Ringabella Bay, where two people who had been cut off by the tide attempted to swim across the bay to Fountainstown and one of the casualties found themselves in difficulty.

Local kayakers raised the alarm by VHF with the Coast Guard who tasked the Crosshaven lifeboat to attend.

Meanwhile, the rescue rib from a local Adventure Centre overheard the VHF transmissions, responded immediately and took the casualty from the water.

On scene, the Lifeboat crew talked to the casualty and confirmed that she was medically fit and required no further assistance, before the Rescue rib dropped the casualty back to Fountainstown beach. The second
the casualty had made their own way ashore.

The lifeboat crew were stood down and continued with their exercise.

Helm, James Fegan commented, “Members of the public need to be aware of the times of high and low water before crossing sandbanks and if they do get cut off by the tide to dial 999/112 and ask for the Coast Guard.
Stay High, Stay Dry and Stay Put until the rescue services attend” James also offered his thanks to the crew of Funkytown for responding so rapidly to what could have been a serious incident.

Crosshaven Coast Guard unit was also tasked.

Crew: James Fegan, Warren Forbes, Jonny Bermingham and Norman Jackson. Shore Crew; Suzanne Deane, Wojtec Solinsky and DLA Micheal McCann.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under

On Saturday afternoon, 14 May, while on exercise in Cork Harbour, Crosshaven RNLI volunteers were tasked by the Coast Guard to a 32’ yacht with suspected electrical fire on board and mechanical difficulties.

The lifeboat with David Venner, Clare Morgan, Warren Forbes and Ian Venner on board made best speed to the casualty which had two people on board and was in a position off the Whitegate oil refinery jetty.

Forbes and Morgan boarded the vessel and checked the fire was extinguished, brought the sails under control and set up a tow to the Royal Cork Yacht Club marina at Crosshaven.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under

Proof of the continuing resurgence of the 1720 sportsboat class was evident in Crosshaven in Cork Harbour at the weekend with the arrival - and naming of - another addition to the Royal Cork fleet.  

Given the number at the "Europeans Championships" in Dunmore East in September, where numbers were just under 30 boats, the 2022 season already looks sure to be a highlight of July's Cork Week Regatta when the club's design will take centre stage. 

It's obvious there's been some TLC that went into this lovely new addition, her silver-grey topsides looking every inch the perfect finish!

1720 'Breaking Bad' - silver grey topsides1720 'Breaking Bad' - silver grey topsides

As to the identity of the skipper of Breaking Bad, there's no confirmation from Crosshaven yet, but insiders say a Laser National Champion may take the helm.

Published in 1720

RNLI Lifeboat volunteers received a page from Valentia Coast Guard at 12.37 this afternoon to attend a boat fire and person in the water at a mooring near the Point Slipway in Cork Harbour.

As the crew were assembling and making ready to launch, A Royal Cork Yacht Club RIB arrived at the station with the casualty from the water who had serious burns.

The RNLI casualty care crew of Jenna O’Shea, Claire Morgan, Caoimhe Foster, Warren Forbes and James Fegan brought the casualty into the station and treated his injuries along with Crosshaven Coast Guard first responders.

Meanwhile, the yacht Club RIB had returned for a second casualty, who had minor burns and possible smoke inhalation and also brought him back to the station for medical aid.

Both casualties were transported to CUH by two HSE ambulance.

The incident was attended by Crosshaven Fire Brigade, HSE Ambulance Service, Crosshaven Coast Guard, The Port of Cork, a private RIB and the Royal Cork Yacht Club safety RIB which acted immediately they saw the incident, recovered the casualty from the water and brought him immediately to the Lifeboat Station for Casualty care. 

This incident was the fourth tasking in two days for Crosshaven RNLI.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under

If you were to bring together even half of the boats built with the involvement of the late great George Bushe of Crosshaven, you'd have the makings of a fascinating maritime museum. The master boatbuilder – whose skills live on nationally and internationally in his sons Mark and Killian – was game for any challenge, whether it was of complex boat engineering, or a world-class yacht finish. And if it came to the pinch, he was more than capable of turning his hand to boat design as well.

It says everything about the quality of George's work that he is still remembered for building a boat too well. In the mid 1950s, he was commissioned to provide one of only two International Dragons ever constructed in Ireland, in this case Melisande for ace Cork Harbour helm Joe FitzGerald.

With Melisande finished and looking exquisite, the Class Surveyor was brought over from Scandinavia to certify her as a true International Dragon. But she was rejected. It seems that George had rounded off the edges of all the bent timbers within the hull when apparently the Dragon small-print rules – in a throwback to the class's origins as an inexpensive weekend cruiser – insisted that the timbers be left basic finish, with angled edges and no fancy smoothing off.

It was quite a challenge to re-frame Melisande without damaging her superbly-finished hull, and by the time she was finally certified as a Dragon, the overall cost was well north of the economy package which had been the thinking at the class's origin in 1929.

The traditional Crosshaven Boatyard setup of camping out in the main boatshed, complete with a small shed shed for your own gear, the spars newly varnished, and a mysterious old boat lurking alongside with a magical little transom that suggests serious ambitions in rowing races. Photo: Darryl Hughes   The traditional Crosshaven Boatyard setup of camping out in the main boatshed, complete with a small shed shed for your own gear, the spars newly varnished, and a mysterious old boat lurking alongside with a magical little transom that suggests serious ambitions in rowing races. Photo: Darryl Hughes

But getting it right was one of the many challenges George took in his stride. Another was the very Corkonian one of a local dinghy sailor ordering a new Bushe-built IDRA 14, with the deal only being finalised and the boat accepted if she had won the up-coming IDRA Nationals on Lough Derg. The word is George built the boat as the ultimate IDRA 14 of that year's crop, and then raced her himself to victory on Lough Derg, with a done deal following immediately afterwards.

With such a talent - whether ashore in the building shed or out on the racecourse – you'd think any way at all of linking a boat to George Bushe is something special. So it has been something of a wonder that in Crosshaven Boatyard, where he has been re-fitting his 1938 43ft Tyrrell classic gaff ketch Maybird, that noted mover and shaker Darryl Hughes has managed to find a very special George Bushe boat called Lorelei of early 1950s vintage, a boat which had more or less slipped away under the radar.

All is revealed as Lorelei is turned for the first time in years – this was George Bushe's 1953 take on a serious racing skiff. Photo: Darryl Hughes   All is revealed as Lorelei is turned for the first time in years – this was George Bushe's 1953 take on a serious racing skiff. Photo: Darryl Hughes  

He'd become curious about a 30ft long and very slim four-oared classic rowing skiff, dusty and hidden in the shed against the wall beside a space where he'd found some room to do the usual wellnigh perfect varnish work on Maybird's already many spars, which seem to double in number whenever varnishing time comes around.

In Crosshaven, where boats are involved, you approach such mysteries as this sidelined skiff with care and diplomacy, and it has been doubly difficult with the pubs being shut. However, eventually, it was revealed that the last known owners were the now non-functional Crosshaven Rowing Club. But the boat hadn't been used for at least twenty years, and if rowing does revive on the Owenabue River, it will more likely be with more modern design concepts which emerged from hotbeds of design development such as the Ron Holland Office.

The old hidden boat was built to race with a class of similar skiffs which were very active up in Cork City at the time, based around Marina. In her day, she must have been quite the hot property, as George incorporated lots of weight-saving techniques such as notably wide plywood planking which was edge-glued, while the reinforcing hull timbers are of minimal size. And as each rowlock had its own reinforced bracket external to the hull, he didn't feel the need to reinforce the entire gunwhale with further weight other than using a slightly heavier gauge of marine ply as the top strake.

Seen from ahead, the lightness of construction is evident, yet there is no sign of it having been too light. Photo: Darryl Hughes   Seen from ahead, the lightness of construction is evident, yet there is no sign of it having been too light. Photo: Darryl Hughes  

This makes you think that the boat must have wriggled along when they were rowing at full power, but the fact that after nearly 70 years, the hull is still in basically good order seems to indicate that George got it right.

After her period up at Marina, she was acquired by the expanding Crosshaven Rowing Club, but for at least two decades, she had become out-of-sight and out-of-mind in this hidden corner of the boatyard until Darryl came poking around.

As it's a time of change at Crosshaven Boatyard, he reckoned that the occasion was ripe for this remarkable boat to find a viable new home and guaranteed future. So having contacted the surviving members of the CRC and Mark Bushe, permission was given for Barry Saunders and the Stella Maris Rowing Club in Ringsend in Dublin to take her over, and now this remarkable craft has a new home on the banks of the Liffey, with her first appearance afloat under the new custodianship a keenly-anticipated event.

Changed circumstances – Lorelei in her new home at the Stella Maris Club in Ringsend, her slim lines much in evidence in her first appearance in sunshine in 20 years.   Changed circumstances – Lorelei in her new home at the Stella Maris Club in Ringsend, her slim lines much in evidence in her first appearance in sunshine in 20 years. Photo: Barry Saunders

Yet what, you might well ask, has all this to do with Tinseltown's blonde bombshell Marilyn Monroe? Well, the mystery skiff is very clearly named Lorelei. So it could well be that her early crews were enthusiasts for Germanic mythology and its influence on Wagnerian and other operas through the story of Lorelei, the doomed Rhine maiden.

There's no doubting the boat's name, but why was she so-called? Photo: Darryl HughesThere's no doubting the boat's name, but why was she so-called? Photo: Darryl Hughes

But the smart money bets otherwise. It doesn't see lusty rowing crews as being into opera, notwithstanding the importance of the Cork Opera House. However, at the time Lorelei was built, one of the great new box office movie hits was the musical Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, starring Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell. Monroe was on top form as the showgirl Lorelei, she was at her best, and of course if a crewman's missus or girl-friend threw a frost over the boat being name after a Hollywood pin-up, the advantage of a rowing club is that you could say it was nothing to do with you personally, but everyone else seemed to want it……

Whatever, it gives us an opportunity to draw your attention to a YouTube clip which dates from a time when movies were supposed to be totally entertaining, songs were expected to be witty and tuneful, and musicals required a mind-boggling level of choreography:

Published in Cork Harbour

Crosshaven RNLI lifeboat was paged at 2.10 am and launched at 2.30 am this morning to a vessel broken down between Myrtleville and Fountainstown off Cork Harbour.

Initially, the position was given as 2 miles East of Myrtleville. The volunteer crew had a casualty mobile number and were able to get a Lat/Long position from their phone which placed them between Myrtleville and Fountainstown.

The RIB, with two persons on board had run out of fuel, had no working navigation lights and no working VHF radio. One of the casualties was very cold and the two casualties were transferred to the lifeboat before taking the RIB in tow to Crosshaven.

The lifeboat was recovered, refuelled, washed down and declared ready for service once more at 4.50 am.

The crew on this service, Alan Venner in command with Claire Morgan, Peter Lane and Jonny Bermingham.

Shore Crew, Norman Jackson, Jenna O’Shea, Richie Leonard, James Fegan, Gary Heslin and Kevin McCarthy.

Helm, Alan Venner commented on the importance of ''having your vessel in good order and making sure you have enough fuel onboard before heading to sea."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

A family of six had a close call when one of their Kayaks capsized in Cork Harbour.

The double kayak capsized after being hit by the wake of a passing vessel throwing the father and his 4-year-old son into the water.

Crosshaven RNLI volunteers immediately launched after being paged at 12.40 pm this afternoon and found the family ashore on Spike Island. The child was very cold after spending 20 to 30 minutes in the water and initially, the crew were very concerned for his welfare. The crew warmed the child up in what was warm sunshine and continued to monitor him. Eventually, the Child was eating and drinking with no signs of distress and it was decided to transport the family and their kayaks back to their vehicle at Paddy’s Point slipway.

Crew on this service was David Venner in command with Norman Jackson, Derek Moynan and Alan Venner. The launch and recovery crew were JP English (DLA) , Michael McCann and Jon Meaney.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Crosshaven RNLI Lifeboat crew in Cork Harbour went to the assistance of two anglers today (Saturday, 6 February) after their vessel had mechanical problems, one and a half miles South East of Roches Point.

The volunteer lifeboat crew were paged at 9.42 am this morning and made their way to the 32' angling vessel in reasonably calm seas, before attaching a tow line for the four-mile journey back to Crosshaven. The vessel was made secure at Salve Marine pontoons before the crew returned to station at 11.35 am.

The crew on this shout were Ian Venner in command with Molly Murphy, Peter Lane and Richie Leonard. Commenting after the event, Helm Ian Venner said, ‘The casualty crew
did exactly as they were meant to, and called the Coast Guard as soon as they had a problem.. The engine problems meant they were dead in the water and at the mercy
of the tides. Fortunately, there was only a 10 to 12 Knot Northerly wind blowing them away from the land.’

The lifeboat was recovered, washed down, refuelled and declared ready for service once more at 12.15 pm

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The volunteers of Crosshaven RNLI lifeboat were paged at 5.51 pm this evening (Saturday 19 July) to go to the aid of a broken-down vessel, East of Power Head at the entrance to Cork Harbour.

The lifeboat with Ian Venner in command and with Claire Morgan, Derek Moynan and Jonathan Birmingham on board made best speed towards the Casualty in good conditions and a slight sea.

First reports were that the 23' powerboat with two persons on board had broken down and was at anchor awaiting help.

Enroute, the lifeboat crew was informed by the Coast Guard that the casualty had managed to restart their engine and was slowly making for Ballycotton and would be obliged for the lifeboat to escort the vessel into the harbour.

The lifeboat crew were happy to oblige and saw the vessel safely moored in the harbour at Ballycotton.

Commenting on the incident, helm, Ian Venner said the vessels owner had 'done everything by the book and called the problem into the Coast Guard immediately and then anchored the vessel.'

Launch crew on this call out were Sandra Farrell, Susanne Deane, Richie Leonard and Caomhe Foster. The lifeboat returned to station at 8 pm.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 1 of 15

boot Düsseldorf, the International Boat Show

With almost 250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair and every year in January the “meeting place" for the entire industry. Around 2,000 exhibitors present their interesting new products, attractive further developments and maritime equipment. This means that the complete market will be on site in Düsseldorf and will be inviting visitors on nine days of the fair to an exciting journey through the entire world of water sports in 17 exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology, equipment and accessories, services, canoes, kayaks, kitesurfing, rowing, diving, surfing, wakeboarding, windsurfing, SUP, fishing, maritime art, marinas, water sports facilities as well as beach resorts and charter, there is something for every water sports enthusiast.

boot Düsseldorf FAQs

boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair. Seventeen exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology.

The Fairground Düsseldorf. This massive Dusseldorf Exhibition Centre is strategically located between the River Rhine and the airport. It's about 20 minutes from the airport and 20 minutes from the city centre.

250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair.

The 2018 show was the golden jubilee of the show, so 2021 will be the 51st show.

Every year in January. In 2021 it will be 23-31 January.

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Messeplatz 40474 Düsseldorf Tel: +49 211 4560-01 Fax: +49 211 4560-668

The Irish marine trade has witnessed increasing numbers of Irish attendees at boot over the last few years as the 17-Hall show becomes more and more dominant in the European market and direct flights from Dublin offer the possibility of day trips to the river Rhine venue.

Boats & Yachts Engines, Engine parts Yacht Equipment Watersports Services Canoes, Kayaks, Rowing Waterski, Wakeboard, Kneeboard & Skimboard Jetski + Equipment & Services Diving, Surfing, Windsurfing, Kite Surfing & SUP Angling Maritime Art & Crafts Marinas & Watersports Infrastructure Beach Resorts Organisations, Authorities & Clubs

Over 1000 boats are on display.

©Afloat 2020

At A Glance – Boot Dusseldorf 

Organiser
Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz
40474 Düsseldorf
Tel: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668
Web: https://www.boot.com/

The first boats and yachts will once again be arriving in December via the Rhine.

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2022

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating