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Bundoran RNLI Undertake Intensive Casualty Care Training to Help Save Lives at Sea

4th March 2019
Bundoran RNLI volunteers pictured back from left, Paul Gallagher, Finn Mullen, Oisin Cassidy, Chris Fox and front from left, Shane O Neill, Nathan Cassidy, Mark Vaughan. Bundoran RNLI volunteers pictured back from left, Paul Gallagher, Finn Mullen, Oisin Cassidy, Chris Fox and front from left, Shane O Neill, Nathan Cassidy, Mark Vaughan.

Volunteer crew members at Bundoran RNLI recently undertook an intensive casualty care course, receiving specialised training to enhance their lifesaving skills at sea.

The course ran by RNLI trainer Jen Forsyth, focused on effective hands-on treatment rather than complex theory or diagnosis and provided crew with the skills to confidently treat casualties.

Maritime search and rescue medicine is a specialised field and the RNLI’s unique course prepares lifeboat crew to manage the situations that are encountered in the operational environment.

"Maritime search and rescue medicine is a specialised field"

During the training each participant had to pass both a written and a practical scenario to demonstrate their individual skill. At the end of the course all crew took part in final practical scenarios where teams of casualty carers treated multiple casualties.

Speaking following the training, Shane O’Neill, Bundoran RNLI Lifeboat Training Coordinator, said: ‘Our crew is prepared to drop everything and risk their lives to save others at a moment’s notice. Their lifesaving work is essential, often difficult and sometimes dangerous. And with only one in 10 volunteers joining the RNLI from a professional maritime occupation, training is especially important. Here in Bundoran, our lifeboat crew train together every week, both at sea and ashore.

‘Casualty care is a crucial link in the search and rescue chain of survival that allows lifeboat crews to save lives at sea. Casualties have to be treated and kept alive often in a sometimes unforgiving and hostile environment until the casualty can be handed into the care of our emergency services colleagues. Our crew will continue to practice and hone these skills on a regular basis through scenario based training.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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