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The popular Dublin Bay Winter sailing series may be postponed due to Level 5 restrictions but DBSC Turkey Shoot organiser Fintan Cairns believes there is still scope for a resumption of sailing before Christmas

On the day the 2020 Turkey Shoot Series should have started last Sunday it was heartening nevertheless to see boats back on the water at Dun Laoghaire and going for a sail on the Bay in a good outdoor healthy atmosphere without contaminating themselves or others.

Hopefully, the powers that be and the civil servants will support us and can see their way to let us go sailing again?

As the Government advertisements say, such activity is good for our personal and collective resilience and well being:- "Outdoor activity is important for physical and mental health. Sport Ireland will support people to stay active through the winter"!

#Join the Turkey Shoot!

Published in Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) will launch its AIB sponsorship with a sailing psychology evening featuring some of the country's top sailors online.

RTÉ's Fergal Keane from Seascapes will host a live chat with top professional sailors Tom Dolan, Annalise Murphy and Damian Foxall as well as leading sports psychologist, Dr Kate Kirby.

Annalise Murphy training in her Laser dinghy in Dun Laoghaire Harbour Photo: AfloatAnnalise Murphy training in her Laser dinghy in Dun Laoghaire Harbour Photo: Afloat

The sailors will outline their own approaches to sport psychology and how resilience forms an essential part of their make-up.

Sports psychology has traditionally been viewed as only having application to high performance or professional sports. However, many of the techniques in sport psychology have just as much relevance for recreational athletes and also can be applied to our personal and professional lives.

The free DBSC virtual event to highlight its partnership with AIB is on Thursday 12 November at 19.30hrs.

Published in DBSC

The 20th edition of the popular Dublin Bay Sailing Club Turkey Shoot Series due to start in November has been postponed due to the Level Five COVID-19 lockdown beginning tonight but organisers hope there may still be a chance of some racing come December.

As Afloat previously reported, November's eight-race DBSC was set to run each Sunday from the 1st November to 20th December and hosted by the Royal Irish Yacht Club

According to DBSC race organiser, Fintan Cairns, there may still be a chance for some racing prior to Christmas, "if we drop back a level or 2 and sailing in pods, or bubbles is revisited", he says.

The restrictions are due to be reviewed in four weeks.

The short, sharp format of racing has earned a strong following on the capital's waters and the series regularly attracts up to 60 or 70 boats.

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

The Notice of Race has been published for November's eight-race DBSC Turkey Shoot that is sponsored by the club's new title sponsor, AIB.

Running each Sunday from the 1st November to 20th December and hosted by the Royal Irish Yacht Club, 2020 is the 20th edition of the popular Winter Sailing series in the capital

The short, sharp format of racing has earned a strong following on the capital's waters under race organiser Fintan Cairns and the series regularly attracts up to 60 or 70 boats.

As Afloat reported previously, racing is under modified ECHO. Cruisers, cruising boats, one-designs and boats that do not normally race are very welcome, especially those who may be seeking some more racing given this cut-short COVID-19 hit 2020 season.

In 2019, the 66-boat Dublin Bay-based series was won by the Trapper Eleint with 1720 sportsboats taking second and third overall. 

The Notice of Race for the Series is downloadable below.

Published in DBSC

It’s no secret that the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Laser fleet is in good shape. Anybody strolling the piers or looking out on club forecourts will have seen that for themselves. DBSC (Dublin Bay Sailing Club) in 2020 drew a huge entry of 92 Laser 4.7s, Radials and Standards, with regular turnouts of 60-70 boats, with sailors of all ages. Likewise, numerous pods go out training once or twice a week, sharpening race skills and getting newer or returning sailors up to scratch for the real deal.

Everybody in this local Laser community just gets on with it in a great spirit of co-operation and camaraderie. We will get the sailors on the water for racing, but that’s where experienced DBSC Race Officer Suzanne McGarry steps in, aided by a wonderful flagship team. DBSC delivered a wonderful programme from late June to mid September, despite all the challenges of this annus horribilis. Until Level 3 kicked in, organizers squeezed in 24 great Saturday Laser races, as well as a comprehensive Tuesday night series. The funny thing now as we all reflect is that many of us can’t remember a more enjoyable sailing season, even with no showers, outdoor changing at times and all the very necessary protocols. I suppose it was all about local sailing again and people got into a really nice rhythm, uninterrupted by regattas, Championships or foreign holidays! The class captains for the last six years were, therefore, delighted to meet Suzanne at the RStGYC yesterday to present a token of our appreciation for her and the whole team. She went to great lengths to explain about the importance and dedication of everybody involved in the race management team and it’s striking so many have worked together for so many years.

It was in 2015 that Lasers really came out from the shadows in Dun Laoghaire after the fleet had dwindled to 3 or 4 stalwarts, by then subsumed into the Mixed PY division. DBSC had the foresight to listen, giving us our own class again, more shorter races and low entry fees (especially for Under 25s). We were immediately up over 30 boats by 2015 and we’ve basically added 10 regular racers each season since then, even more this year with the push into solo sailing.

Tuesday DBSC night Laser racing in 2020 Photo: Rob WalkerTuesday DBSC night Laser racing in 2020 Photo: Rob Walker

Excellent race management has been a massive contribution to the growth of the class. We estimate that Suzanne has presided over more than 80% of the hundreds of races staged in the last six years. Start lines are square, beats and runs are true and results are gathered efficiently. But remember, we’re talking about very tricky conditions here. Racing is within the shifty confines of our wonderful harbour, or outside in Scotsman’s Bay, often in a fickle evening breeze, with a strong tide. Despite being in that characteristic, steely “zone” up on the foredeck, Suzanne is very approachable and receptive to feedback onshore. Indeed, this season, after only a few races, she quickly introduced an innovative tweak to the starting procedure, to give the big Radial fleet more time to digest course changes between races. Incidentally, the 53 boat Laser Radial entry is almost definitely the largest local racing Radial fleet in the world, just now.

Laser thank you trophy

The 2020 season was an amazing effort by all DBSC Officers and volunteers. Suzanne and her team got dinghies out competing on June 30th as Afloat reported here. This was at the earliest possible opportunity given government guidelines and well before DBSC keelboat racing started.

Undoubtedly, the Laser turnout that day of 60 boats was the biggest one-design racing staged anywhere in Ireland since the Pandemic began. We hope we encouraged others up and down the country. 

From all Dun Laoghaire Laser sailors, thank you, Suzanne and colleagues, for all your support and service down the years.

Below are the names of the core people who help Suzanne and keep the show on the road;

Barbara Conway. Ros Bremner. Caroline Liddy. Brendan Dalton, Declan Traynor, Dara Traynor, James Traynor, Dave Coleman, Liz Aylmer, Sharon Moylan, Ian Mathews, Ben Mulligan, Niki Wheatley, Susan Spain, Caitriona O’Brien Michael Costelloe and Joanne Sheehan

There will be no further Dublin Bay Sailing Club Summer Series racing due to the continuing Government Level 3 restrictions and Irish Sailing guidelines.

At the start of the partial lockdown in the capital, it had been hoped that Dublin might emerge from Level 3 conditions at midnight this Friday to enable the final race of the summer to be sailed this Saturday (October 10) on Dublin Bay as per 2020's revised AIB sponsored race schedule.

Unfortunately, however, the continuing restrictions have led DBSC to announce 'there will be no further racing in the above race series', according to DBSC honorary secretary Chris Moore.

DBSC Turkey Shoot

Ireland's largest racing yacht club, is, however, looking forward to its annual Turkey Shoot Series with the first race scheduled for this November 1st, as Afloat previously reported here.

A Notice of Race and online entry forms will be available in the near future.

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club’s final Saturday race of the truncated summer season remains a possibility if the capital is lifted out of Level 3 coronavirus restrictions on Friday 9 October.

Earlier today (Thursday 1 October), Irish Sailing provided an update on the current situation for sailing under the new five-level plan, confirming that the sport will have no exemption from the current NPHET advice which has tied up boats in Dublin and Donegal.

Irish Sailing says it made representations to Sport Ireland and the Expert Group in respect of the relatively low risk activities that sailing encompasses.

But the current guidelines remain — despite exceptions being made for high-level rugby and GAA competitions.

Sailing’s governing body in Ireland also moved to clear up confusion of the changing definition of a ‘pod’ in the revised health guidelines.

“Under Level 3, Sport Ireland uses the term ‘non contact pods’ to counteract the risk of people being close contacts, and that people within a pod must not ‘spend more than 15 minutes within 2 metres of someone either indoors or outdoors. Where sports can’t achieve this, they should modify activity appropriately.’

“For sailing this means we can only do single-handed or same-household sailing unless social distancing can be maintained while aboard.”

Irish Sailing added: “Sport Ireland are working with all sporting bodies to clarify any confusion and ensure consistency across the sporting sector is maintained within the Government’s five-level plan.”

Tagged under

November's eight-race DBSC Turkey Shoot to run each Sunday from the 1st November to 20th December and hosted by the Royal Irish Yacht Club is the 20th edition of the popular series. 

The short, sharp format of racing has earned a strong following on the capital's waters under race organiser Fintan Cairns and the series regularly attracts up to 60 or 70 boats.

Racing is under modified ECHO. Cruisers, cruising boats, one-designs and boats that do not normally race are very welcome and perhaps the cut short 2020 season may see more venture out this winter subject to the lifting of Dublin COVID restrictions that brought the curtain down on September sailing this weekend.

In 2019, the 66-boat Dublin Bay-based series was won by the Trapper Eleint with 1720 sportsboats taking second and third overall. 

A Notice of Race for the Series will issue shortly.

Published in Turkey Shoot
Tagged under

Dublin Bay Sailing Club has 'suspended' its AIB DBSC 2020 Summer Sailing Series in light of this evening's latest government Level 3 restrictions that impact sailing activity.

As the Level 3 partial shutdown is expected to extend beyond the last race of the DBSC season in October it effectively ends the 2020 summer racing season for the largest yacht racing club in the country. 

Dublin Bay Sailing Club is the umbrella organisation for all four waterfront clubs in Dun Laoghaire Harbour and this year had seen regular turnouts of over 100 boats for Thursday and Saturday racing.

As Afloat reported earlier, the suspension follows the earlier cancellation of the Laser Masters Championships at the Royal St. George Yacht Club also at Dun Laoghaire.

DBSC's Honorary Secretary, Chris Moore says "We take the opportunity of thanking all our members and volunteers for their input during 2020, and look forward to more normal times in the future. Stay Safe, and respect social distancing".

Published in DBSC

132 boats across 20 classes turned out for Saturday's Dublin Bay Sailing Club Race. 

In the big cruiser division, the First 40 Prima Forte was the IRC Zero winner from  XP 44 WOW and the Beneteau 44.7 Lively Lady. 

IRC One was dominated by J109s. White Mischief won from Chimaera and Something Else.

In the One Design classes, many of which had two races, Frequent Flyer was the winner of both Flying Fifteen races. Likewise in the SB20s where Ted won two from two.

Full results below

DBSC Results for 12/09/2020

Race 1

Cruiser 0 IRC: 1. Prima Forte, 2. Wow, 3. Lively Lady

Cruiser 0 Echo: 1. Prima Forte, 2. Lively Lady, 3. D-Tox

Cruiser 1 IRC: 1. White Mischief, 2. Chimaera, 3. Something Else

Cruiser 1 Echo: 1. Something Else, 2. White Mischief, 3. Jump the Gun

Cruiser 1 J109: 1. White Mischief, 2. Chimaera, 3. Ruth

31.7 One Design: 1. Levante, 2. Prospect, 3. Bluefin Two

31.7 Echo: 1. Fiddly Bits, 2. Bluefin Two, 3. Levante

Cruiser 2 IRC: 1. Windjammer, 2. Peridot, 3. Rupert

Cruiser 2 Echo: 1. Boojum, 2. Enchantress, 3. Leeuwin

Cruiser 2 Sigma 33: 1. Rupert, 2. Leeuwin, 3. Boojum

Cruiser 3 IRC: 1. Starlet, 2. Dubious, 3. Maranda

Cruiser 3 Echo: 1. Pamafe, 2. Krypton, 3. Starlet

Cruiser 5 NS-IRC: 1. Gung Ho, 2. Persistance, 3. Act Two

Cruiser 5 Echo: 1. Act Two, 2. Sweet Martini, 3. Sea Safari

SB20: 1. Ted, 2. Carpe Diem, 3. SeaBiscuit

Sportsboat: 1. George/Riordan/Simington, 2. Jambiya, 3. George 1/McNamara

Dragon: 1. Phantom, 2. D-Cision

Flying 15: 1. Frequent Flyer, 2. Ignis Caput, 3. Flyer

Ruffian: 1. Bandit, 2. Ripples, 3. Ruffles

Shipman: 1. Poppy, 2. Jo Slim, 3. Invader

B211 One Design: 1. Ventuno, 2. Small Wonder, 3. Beeswing

B211 Echo: 1. Ventuno, 2. Small Wonder, 3. Plan B

Glen: 1. Glen Luce, 2. GlenDun, 3. Glenroan

PY Class: 1. N Butler, 2. B Foley, 3. Allsorts

IDRA 14: 1. Slipstream, 2. Dart, 3. Chaos

Fireball: 1. F Miller, 2. P ter Horst, 3. N Miller

Laser Standard: 1. F Walker, 2. R O'Leary, 3. B Maguire

Laser Radial: 1. G Fisher, 2. C Gorman, 3. R Geraghty-McDonnell

Laser 4.7: 1. A Daly, 2. L Turvey, 3. F McDonnell

Race 2

SB20: 1. Ted, 2. venuesworld.com, 3. Carpe Diem

Sportsboat: 1. Jambiya, 2. George 1/McNamara, 3. G. O'Connor

Dragon: 1. Phantom, 2. D-Cision

Flying 15: 1. Frequent Flyer, 2. FFuZZy, 3. Phoenix

B211 One Design: 1. Billy Whizz, 2. Chinook, 3. Beeswing

B211 Echo: 1. Ventuno, 2. Small Wonder, 3. Beeswing

PY Class: 1. N Butler, 2. Allsorts, 3. B Foley

IDRA 14: 1. Chaos, 2. Dutch Courage, 3. Slipstream

Fireball: 1. F Miller, 2. N Miller, 3. P ter Horst

Laser Standard: 1. G Murphy, 2. R O'Leary, 3. F Walker

Laser Radial: 1. J Murphy, 2. R Geraghty-McDonnell, 3. C Gorman

Laser 4.7: 1. L Turvey, 2. A Daly, 3. H Turvey

Published in Dublin Bay
Page 2 of 102

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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