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Displaying items by tag: Fenit

Work is set to begin next month on the development of the Fenit Viewing Platform - a Community Heritage Project that will offer commanding views of Tralee Bay and highlight the marine landscape and ecology of the Bay, including maritime history, flora, and fauna.

As the County Kerry's fishing and maritime population is changing fast, the local community hopes to document it for future generations.

The works include the production of a 2.6-metre bronze map, to be located on the wasteland at the western side of Fenit pier below the statue of St. Brendan the Navigator.

"We believe that this project has the potential to capture and bring to life the full maritime history of Fenit and captivate residents and visitors alike, says the project's Michael Pierce.

Works are expected to commence in April 2024, with an official opening pencilled in for August 2024.

Published in Irish Harbours
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Film footage of the 1970 Fireball World Championship hosted in Fenit by Tralee Bay Sailing Club has been digitised after more than 50 years and has been shared online by John Caig, who won the event with Jack Davies.

According to Caig, the original 16mm film had deteriorated over the decades but a BBC engineer was able to transfer the footage to digital at a higher resolution than existing colour video of the event.

Barry O’Neill of the Royal St George Yacht Club provided Afloat.ie with more details about the film, which was made on “zero budget” by O’Neill and colleagues from the former Arks advertising agency.

Members of the Celtic rock band Horslips also worked at the agency at the time, and O’Neill says he roped them in to compose music for the film, which may mark “one of the first times Horslips had been in a recording studio”.

Published in Fireball

It’s a family affair across RNLI lifeboat crews on call in Cork and Kerry for the Christmas holiday period.

In Crosshaven and Ballycotton respectively, a father and daughter and a husband and wife are among the RNLI families in Cork who will be on call together for the first time this Christmas.

As the charity launches its Christmas appeal, asking for help to continue its lifesaving work at sea, Crosshaven RNLI’s Holly Fegan and Ballycotton RNLI’s married couple Brian and Ann Daly will be among the new lifeboat crew preparing to drop their festive plans this year and go to the aid of someone in need over the Christmas period.

Nineteen-year-old Holly Fegan joined the crew at Crosshaven RNLI three months ago. Her father James has been on the crew for 18 years while her cousin Molly is also a crew member, and her uncle and godfather Patsy Fegan is the lifeboat operations manager.

The family ties don’t end there as her aunt Tina Bushe was the first female helm at Crosshaven while supporting the work of the station’s fundraising branch are her aunt Annamarie Fegan and before her, Holly’s late grandmother Marie Fegan.

“Since I was a child, I have been going to the lifeboat station with my dad or helping out at open days with my grandmother,” Holly says. “I have always loved the atmosphere and the way everybody helps each other, and it is a small community in Crosshaven and I like giving back. As well as my own family connections, it is really an extended family at Crosshaven RNLI.”

Meanwhile, in Co Kerry, 18-year-old social science student Eimer McMorrow Moriarty will be one of four family members on call for Fenit RNLI throughout the festive period.

From left, Fenit RNLI family members John Moriarty, Eimer McMorrow Moriarty, Kevin Moriarty and Billy Moriarty | Credit: James McCarthy/Digimack Photography FenitFrom left, Fenit RNLI family members John Moriarty, Eimer McMorrow Moriarty, Kevin Moriarty and Billy Moriarty | Credit: James McCarthy/Digimack Photography Fenit

Eimer joined the lifeboat crew last year and received her pager in October 2021. Her father Kevin and uncle John are both coxswains at the station while her uncle Billy is also on the crew. Her great grandfather on her mother’s side of the family, Tony Browne, was also on the crew in the past. Not only is she third generation, but she is also the first woman in her family to become a crew member.

“I joined as soon as I was eligible at 17,” Eimer says. “My father has been on the crew for more than 25 years so ever since I was little, growing up as children, my younger sister and I would play lifeboat games and shout ‘lifeboat callout’ when Dad’s pager would go off.

“Along with my dad, I have my own watersport hobbies so joining was also a personal decision as I know it works both ways. On the lifeboat I can contribute to helping someone in need and when on the water myself, I know if I do get into trouble, the lifeboat will come to me.”

A third motivation for Eimer has been a fellow female crew member: “Denise Lynch has been another inspiration for me on the lifeboat. Denise is an incredibly knowledgeable woman who became the first female volunteer coxswain in Ireland back in 2020 which is such a fantastic achievement. I hope that I can follow in her footsteps and become a coxswain one day too and I am very grateful that I have talented people to learn from.“”

A keen windsurfer and sailor, Eimer has been on three callouts since becoming a crew member. “My first callout was quite a serious one as the casualty had fallen off the marina steps and we were unsure of her injuries initially.

“Thankfully, while in shock and showing signs of hypothermia, she was otherwise okay, but I remember as a callout, the experience was intense. There is an adrenalin rush when the pager goes off and when you are trying to get to the station and into your gear as quickly as you can. You always try to prepare for the worst and for the potential that you could be responding to a life and death situation.”

Last Christmas was Eimer’s first Christmas on call and on Christmas Day, she was part of the lifeboat crew who provided safety cover with various other agencies for the annual swim. “It was really satisfying to see how things on Christmas Day remain the same, all the emergency services are all still on call, the pager isn’t turned off and everyone is ready.”

File image of Fenit RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat | Credit: RNLI/FenitFile image of Fenit RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat | Credit: RNLI/Fenit

Eimer says this Christmas will be no different for the Fenit and Valentia lifeboat crews: “Even at Christmas, our lifesavers are ready to drop everything at a moment’s notice and rush to the aid of someone in trouble on the water. At this time of year, the weather is at its worst and lives are on the line. We know that every time our crews go out they hope for a good outcome, but sadly this sometimes isn’t the case.

“There’s no feeling quite like bringing someone home safe to their families – especially at Christmas. As lifeboat crew we couldn’t rescue people without kind donations from the public which fund the kit, training and equipment we need to save others and get home safely to our families.“”

Like hundreds of volunteers around Ireland, Holly and Emer have signed up to save every one from drowning — it has been the charity’s mission since 1824. Indeed, this Christmas many will leave their loved ones behind to answer the call, each time hoping to reunite another family, and see those in trouble at sea safely returned.

During the festive period from Christmas Eve to New Year’s Day over the last five years from 2017-2021, RNLI lifeboats in the Irish region launched 55 times and brought 43 people to safety.

Last year, across the RNLI, lifeboats launched 1,078 times, with volunteer crews bringing 1,485 people to safety, 21 of whom were lives saved. Lifeboats at Youghal, Ballycotton, Crosshaven and Kinsale launched 97 times bringing 137 people to safety. In Kerry, lifeboats at Fenit and Valentia launched 38 times bringing 35 people to safety.

But these rescues would not be possible without donations from the RNLI’s generous supporters, helping to fund the essential kit, training and equipment needed by lifeboat crews all year round.

To make a donation, visit the RNLI’s Christmas Appeal website.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Shannon Foynes Port Company which is Ireland’s second largest port operator, has said that the Shannon Estuary Vision 2041 Masterplan needs to start now.

That’s the view of the Port's CEO Pat Keating on the masterplan which the Minister for the Environment, Eamon Ryan recently launched to highlight the unique strategic location in Ireland and Europe, to develop floating offshore wind projects in the Atlantic.

The masterplan for the Shannon estuary, a 500km2 waterway stretching from Limerick City to Loop Head in Co. Clare, is on course to become an international floating offshore wind energy hub in addition to helping the country reach its climate goals.

According to Mr Keating the masterplan will lead to significant economic impacts in the region aswell to thousands of jobs created. The project is a multi-site approach he added and with strategic development locations across Kerry, that also included opportunities at the Port of Fenit. 

The story from RadioKerry includes an audio clip of the CEO commenting on the potential of renewable projects for the estuary and also along the western seaboard.

Published in Shannon Estuary
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Crowds turned out in the sunshine to see Fenit RNLI’s new inshore lifeboat officially named Lizzie this past weekend (Sunday 29 May).

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the new lifeboat is being named after Liz Fraser, a Southwark-born actress well-known for roles on stage and screen over a career spanning decades and who died in 2018.

Naming honours were given to Jan Bolt, the station’s administration officer and wife to late station mechanic Bob Bolt.

Guests on the day included the RNLI’s new head of region for lifesaving, Anna Classon, in her first visit to the Co Kerry lifeboat station as well and RNLI trustee and council chair Dr John Killeen, who accepted the lifeboat on behalf of the RNLI and presented it to the station.

The ceremony included a service of dedication which was presided over by Fr Francis Nolan and Rvd Jim Stephens. Musical accompaniment was provided by The Tralee Pipe Band; Oidreacht, managed by Michelle O’Sullivan; Fenit School Choir; and Dave Buckley. who performed the RNLI anthem ‘Home from the Sea’ to close the ceremony.

Tom McCormack, chair of the lifeboat management group and station medical advisor, was MC for the ceremony and opened proceedings by paying tribute to the donor and all fundraisers who support the work of the RNLI.

Dr Killeen acknowledged the incredible legacy gift by Frazer: “Being charitable was part of her nature. The legacy that she has left behind and which is here today, will go to sea to save lives for many years to come.”

Fenit’s new inshore lifeboat with the Irish Coast Guard’s Shannon-based helicopter Rescue 115 overhead | Credit: RNLI/Terry SheehyFenit’s new inshore lifeboat with the Irish Coast Guard’s Shannon-based helicopter Rescue 115 overhead | Credit: RNLI/Terry Sheehy

He also spoke of the work of the men and women who volunteer for Fenit RNLI. “When we talk about lifesaving in the RNLI, there are two parts to it. One is the lifeboat, and the other is the volunteers. There is a fantastic history of lifesaving here in Fenit. We value and appreciate the work being done on behalf of the community.”

In accepting the lifeboat into the care of the station, Fenit RNLI lifeboat operations manager Gerard O’Donnell said: “This is a great and proud day for us. We are very sad to say farewell to our past lifeboat, the Sonya and Bradley, which served us well for the past 12 years and we look forward to writing a new era in the history of Fenit lifeboat station with this new lifeboat which has been gifted to us.

“This boat, along with the all-weather lifeboat which we already have, helps provide a great service here to the Tralee Bay and extended areas.”

O’Donnell concluded by addressing the lifeboat crew of Fenit RNLI, past and present: “Over the years you have given of your time consistently, irrespective of weather conditions which at times can be horrendous. Day or night, you have never failed to respond when the pager has been activated.

“To all our past and present, members of our RNLI station, be proud of the service you provide, be proud of the countless lives you have helped to save and finally on behalf of all users of the sea and inland waters, thank you for being there to help save those who get into difficulty on the water.”

Following the naming of the lifeboat, the Irish Coast Guard’s Shannon-based helicopter Rescue 115 carried out a training exercise with the new D-class lifeboat to the delight of the watching crowds.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A legacy from a popular British actor has helped to fund Fenit RNLI’s new inshore lifeboat. The lifeboat is being named Lizzie in memory of Liz Frazer this Sunday (29 May), in a ceremony at the Fenit Lifeboat Station with the public being invited to attend. The lifeboat is being named by Jan Bolt, the station’s admin officer and wife to the late station mechanic Bob Bolt.

Liz Fraser, who was born in Southwark in 1930 was a well-known and much-loved British actor, starring in roles on stage and screen over a career spanning decades. From her early TV work in Dixon of Dock Green, and Hancock’s Half Hour to four Carry On films to a final performance at the age of 87, in a role on the popular English crime drama, Midsomer Murders, Liz’s work was loved and seen by many. Her wish to fund a lifeboat in her name will now see a Kerry lifeboat station become the permanent home for her kind legacy.

Gerard O’Donnell, Fenit RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘We are honoured to be the recipients of this incredible legacy. The arrival of a new lifeboat at a station is always a source of great joy and celebration but there is also a sadness that the person who made it possible is not here to witness it. We thank Ms. Fraser for her lifesaving donation and for bringing a touch of show business to Kerry. We will do our best to honour this gift and to pay tribute to our donor with every callout the lifeboat crew carry out.’

It will be a poignant day for the station with Jan Bolt, the wife of the late station mechanic Bob Bolt naming the lifeboat.

The D-class lifeboat was first introduced into the RNLI fleet in 1963 and the design of the inflatable lifeboat continues to evolve to meet changes in demand and technology. The inshore lifeboat is highly manoeuvrable and usually operates closer to shore than the all-weather lifeboats. Its strength is in searches and rescues in the surf, shallow water, and confined locations - often working close to cliffs, among rocks and even inside caves. Importantly it can also be righted manually by the crew in the event of capsize.

The D class has a maximum speed of 25 knots and can carry three crew members and five survivors. Its communications and navigation equipment include a fitted and hand-held VHF radio, magnetic compass, and an onboard global positioning system (GPS) plotter.

Music at the ceremony will be provided by Tralee Pipe Band and the Fenit National School Choir.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Marine Minister Charlie McConalogue has continued his series of visits to some of Ireland’s main fishing ports, spending yesterday and today (Thursday 16 and Friday 17 September) in Co Kerry.

The minister met with fishers, fishing organisations and other stakeholders as he visited the ports of Dingle, Fenit and Cromane.

These visits follow on from the minister’s trips during the summer to Howth, Kilmore Quay, Dunmore East, Killybegs, Union Hall and Castletownbere.

In Fenit, the minister met with local fishers to discuss fishing matters. The Marine Institute and local stakeholders updated on conservation initiatives and measures for crayfish along the Co Kerry coastline and outlined protection measures for angel shark, skates and rays, particularly in the Tralee Bay area.

A public consultation on the crayfish fishery was launched last month to gather views on measures targeted at eliminating the by-catch of endangered species while seeking to secure a viable and sustainable future for the fishery. The consultation concluded yesterday.

Later the minister visited Dingle Fishery Harbour Centre and met the harbour master. Since 2010, €17.4 million has been invested in the development and maintenance of Dingle FHC under the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine’s Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Capital Programme.

In Dingle, the minister also met with local fishers and representatives of the seafood and broader marine sector including the Dingle Innovation Hub and the Dingle Aquarium.

In Cromane, the minster met with, and heard the views of the local community regarding a landing facility.

Commenting on the visits, Minister McConalogue said: “I have had constructive meetings with fishers, aquaculture farmers and other stakeholders during my visit to Kerry today, and I thank everyone for meeting me to discuss matters important to their communities.

“It is a great opportunity for me to hear directly from marine stakeholders who are central in ensuring the long-term vibrancy of our coastal communities.”

Published in Fishing
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Volunteer lifeboat crew from Fenit RNLI rescued a swimmer last night (Sunday 22 August) following an extensive search after clothes had been found on a beach at Castlegregory earlier in the day. Fenit RNLI and Rescue 115 had been requested to launch by the Irish Coast Guard yesterday morning at 11 am after the discovery of clothes on a beach in Castlegregory. At 8.30 pm volunteer lifeboat crew with Fenit RNLI spotted a head above the water and took the swimmer onboard the All-Weather Lifeboat. It is not known how long the swimmer had been in the water but the casualty was brought to Fenit Harbour to be met by ambulance and brought to hospital.

Early yesterday, Fenit RNLI All-Weather Lifeboat crew were on exercise when they were tasked to a search for swimmer at 12.40 pm, following the discovery of clothes on a beach. Fenit RNLI Inshore lifeboat and Rescue 115 also joined the search. Conditions were excellent with calm waters and low tide and a search was undertaken of the area. With nothing found and no further information, the search was stood down in the afternoon.

At 6 pm the search was reactivated at the request of An Garda Siochana with the two lifeboats searching the original area and the bay nearer to Tralee and again joined by Rescue 115 overhead. At 8.30 pm, volunteer lifeboat crew with Fenit RNLI spotted a pod of dolphins and a head above the water about two and a half miles off Castlegregory beach. The casualty was conscious and immediately recovered onto the lifeboat and brought Fenit Harbour to be taken to hospital. Fenit RNLI’s medical advisor was also on scene.

Commenting on the rescue Fenit RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Gerard O’Donnell said, ‘ After a long and exhaustive search, members of the lifeboat crew were overjoyed to sight the missing swimmer in the water. They had been scanning the water for any sign of movement and were worried with light fading would not find anyone. Even at this time of year, the water can be very cold and as yet we don’t know how long this person was in the water and when they entered it. When the lifeboat crew found them they were a good distance from the shore and were exhausted.’

‘We would advise that anyone undertaking a swim lets people know where they are going and when they expected back. This was a very lucky individual.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Aran Islands RNLI was tasked for a medevac from Inis Mór as a scheduled patient transfer by air was cancelled due to poor visibility yesterday morning, Monday 15 March.

Due to poor visibility, a scheduled patient transfer by air was unable to go ahead. The crew were requested to transfer the patient to Rossaveal.

Following all strict Covid-19 health and safety guidelines, the patient was transferred safely aboard the lifeboat to Rossaveal by both the RNLI crew, under John O'Donnell, and the Inis Mór Fire Service.

Having just launched on the return leg, the lifeboat was called back to Inis Mór as another patient on the island needed further medical attention.

The second patient was safely transferred aboard the lifeboat by the volunteer crew at the pontoon on Inis Mór, and the lifeboat then headed straight for Rossaveal Harbour and the waiting ambulance.

Speaking after the callout, Aran Islands RNLI coxswain John O'Donnell said: “The volunteer crew responded quickly and two patients are safely on their way to further medical attention — we would like to wish them both a speedy recovery.

“Poor visibility can be very dangerous on the water. Should you get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

File image of Fenit RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat (Photo: RNLI/Fenit)File image of Fenit RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat | Photo: RNLI/Fenit

Elsewhere, Fenit RNLI’s volunteer crew responded to a report of concern for a windsurfer in the Maharees Islands area early on Sunday evening, 14 March.

The all-weather lifeboat launched with a full crew on board and headed to the location near Castlegregory, on the north side of the Dingle Peninsula.

The Irish Coast Guard’s Shannon-based helicopter Rescue 115 also attended the scene in a search co-ordinated by Valentia Coast Guard.

A search of the given location was under way when word was received that the windsurfer had safely made his way ashore.

Speaking following the callout, Fenit RNLI coxswain Finbarr O’Connell said: “Fenit RNLI are delighted with a safe and positive outcome for all concerned. As always this is an opportunity to remind all users of the sea to be as prepared as possible when going to sea.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Courtmacsherry RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat was called out yesterday afternoon (Sunday 21 February) to a surfer in difficulty off Garrettstown Beach near the Old Head of Kinsale.

The Trent class lifeboat with a crew of five was under way within minutes of the 3.40pm call.

However, upon reaching the scene less than 15 minutes later, they learned that the surfer had managed to get ashore with the help of family members.

“It was great to see the fast response of so many of our volunteer crew again today, when their bleepers activated, which ensured that we were at the scene very quickly,” said Brian O'Dwyer, Courtmacsherry RNLI volunteer lifeboat operations manager.

Elsewhere, Fenit RNLI’s volunteer crew were tasked around 1pm to reports of two upturned kayaks in the Banna Strand area.

The station launched both its all-weather and inshore lifeboats, with a full crew on both vessels.

File image of Fenit RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat (Photo: RNLI/Fenit)File image of Fenit RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat | Photo: RNLI/Fenit

On arrival at the scene of the reported sighting, the lifeboat crews were advised that the occupants of the kayaks were safe and accounted for, and their kayaks washed ashore shortly afterwards.

Fenit lifeboat press officer Jackie Murphy said the volunteers “were delighted that there was a safe and positive outcome for all concerned”.

Meanwhile, the RNLI stresses to all those taking part in any water activities or planning a visit to the coast during this extended lockdown to follow its water safety advice below, along with all new Government regulations, and stay safe in these different times for all rescue services:

  • Have a plan — check the weather forecast, tide times and read local hazard signage.
  • Keep a close eye on your family — on the beach, on the shoreline and in the water.
  • Don’t allow your family to swim alone.
  • Don’t use inflatables at all, at all on the sea.
  • Make sure to wear a lifejacket at all times when taking to the sea in a boat.
  • If you fall into the water unexpectedly, FLOAT TO LIVE. Fight your instinct to thrash around, lean back, extend your arms and legs, and float.
  • In an emergency dial 999 or 112 immediately and ask for the coastguard. The rescue services are there to help you all.
Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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RORC Fastnet Race

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge.

For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.

The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish for 2021 is in Cherbourg via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Cherbourg.

Fastnet Race - FAQs

The 49th edition of the biennial Rolex Fastnet Race will start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, UK on Sunday 8th August 2021.

The next two editions of the race in 2021 and 2023 will finish in Cherbourg-en-Cotentin at the head of the Normandy peninsula, France

Over 300. A record fleet is once again anticipated for the world's largest offshore yacht race.

The international fleet attracts both enthusiastic amateur, the seasoned offshore racer, as well as out-and-out professionals from all corners of the world.

Boats of all shapes, sizes and age take part in this historic race, from 9m-34m (30-110ft) – and everything in between.

The Fastnet Race multihull course record is: 1 day 4 hours 2 minutes and 26 seconds (2019, Ultim Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier)

The Fastnet Race monohull course record is: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing).

David and Peter Askew's American VO70 Wizard won the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race, claiming the Fastnet Challenge Cup for 1st in IRC Overall.

Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001.

The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

The winner of the first Fastnet Race was the former pilot cutter Jolie Brise, a boat that is still sailing today.

Cork sailor Henry P F Donegan (1870-1940), who gave his total support for the Fastnet Race from its inception in 1925 and competed in the inaugural race in his 43ft cutter Gull from Cork.

Ireland has won the Fastnet Race twice. In 1987 the Dubois 40 Irish Independent won the Fastnet Race overall for the first time and then in 2007 – all of twenty years after Irish Independent’s win – Ireland secured the overall win again this time thanks to Ger O’Rourke’s Cookson 50 Chieftain from the Royal Western Yacht Club of Ireland in Kilrush.

©Afloat 2020

Fastnet Race 2023 Date

The 2023 50th Rolex Fastnet Race will start on Saturday, 22nd July 2023

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At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 695 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Cherbourg
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

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