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All Ireland Currach Racing League Makes Return to Moy Estuary Boat Club

13th May 2015
All Ireland Currach Racing League  Makes Return to Moy Estuary Boat Club

#currach – The Ballina Quay Regatta fest is making a fantastic return to the quay from June 12th -14th and is set to reignite the nostalgia of years gone by with a spectacular line up featuring All Ireland Currach Racing, boat treasure hunts, fishing competitions, air displays, water skiing and much much more.
The event aims to be a fantastic addition to the already action packed summer calendar in Mayo North and is being presented by the Moy Estuary Boat club, supporting the Ballyglass Lifeboat RNLI service.

After 20 years, the regatta is finally making its grand return and will delight both visitors and locals with an array of magnificient events. Friday night will see a Pirate Treasure Hunt come to the quay, followed by the Rejoice Gospel Choir Concert and the Monarch of the Quay Disco; a perfect introduction to the weekend long entertainment.

The Wild Atlantic Way Discovery Point will host a super adventurous and enjoyable day on Saturday as the Quay will be awash with activity and craic. Stand Up Paddling Board and Kayak races will be taking place all day and there will also be a Fishing Competition in the lead up to the Ceili Mor which will have the entire crowd dancing and jigging as nightime approaches.

On Sunday 14th June, local resident, 92 years young Una Timoney, will cut the ribbon and Mr Chris Reynolds, Director Irish Coast Guard will also officiate at the opening ceremony. This will be followed by Children's Pirate Themed Fancy Dress Parade to the Quay. The Band 2 Brigade will headline on Sunday with an amazing live performace and the final day will also feature a craft fair and a stunning air stunt display, the perfect day out for all the family.

The excitement is surely building, as many of the residents bear fond memories of days gone by and previous regatta festivals in the Quay. Without a doubt, a strong sense of nostalgia surrounds the festival with much anticipation for the return of the regatta, bigger and better than ever before. 4 Team Mixed Relay Swim to Sheaf Throwing, Tug-o-War, and lots more fun and games, the programme of events for the weekend is certainly an impressive one. 

Published in Currachs, Coastal Rowing
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About Currachs

A currach is a type of boat unique to the west coasts of Ireland and Scotland. Traditionally, currachs have a wooden frame over which animal skins or hides are stretched. These days, the wooden frame is more likely to be covered in canvas, which is then painted with tar to make it waterproof.

"Naomhóg" is the name given to the type of currach which used by coastal communities in Cork and Kerry. Currachs differ from each other from region to region. Naomhógs are slightly longer than the currachs used in the West of Ireland.
 
Some believe that currachs first came to the Dingle Peninsula in the early 19th century. They say this type of boat was introduced from Clare, where currachs are known as "canoes". 

Currachs are a unique type of boat that can be found on the west coasts of Ireland and Scotland. These boats are traditionally constructed using a wooden frame over which animal skins or hides are stretched. While this practice is still observed by some, many modern currachs now feature a canvas covering which is painted with tar to make it waterproof.

In coastal communities located in the Cork and Kerry regions, a specific type of currach is used which is known as a Naomhóg. Naomhógs are slightly longer than other types of currachs used in the West of Ireland. It is believed that currachs were first introduced to the Dingle Peninsula in the early 19th century, having been brought over from Clare where they are known as "canoes".

Despite the fact that currachs have been in use for centuries, the different regions in which they are used have developed their own unique variations. As such, currachs can differ from one another significantly depending on their geographic location. Nonetheless, these boats remain an integral part of coastal communities, serving as a reminder of our shared maritime heritage.

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