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With just two years to go before the start of the 2018 Golden Globe Race (GGR) from Falmouth UK on 16th June, Kevin Farebrother from Australia, Lionel Regnier from France bring the entry list to 30 + 7 on wait list.

2016 Golden Globe Race Skipper/Press Conference

As Afloat.ie previously reported, Race founder Don McIntyre says: "With French skippers dominating the entry list, we thought it appropriate to hold the 2016 Golden Globe Conference during the Paris Boat Show between 3-11th December. The date and programme will be announced in July, along with the Final Notice of Race.

The Race in numbers
- The course: 30,000 miles with 4 rendezvous gates - 30 entrants plus 7 on wait list.
- Competitors represent 15 countries (some entrants remain confidential until sponsorship is announced)
- America (4) Australia (3) Brazil (1) Britain (5) Estonia (1) France (7) Germany (1) Ireland (1) Italy (2) New Zealand (1) Palestine (1) Switzerland (1)
- Oldest competitor: Jean-Luc van den Heede (FRA) 71.
- Youngest competitors: aged 26: Roy Hubbard (USA) Susie Goodall (GBR) Neree Cornuz and Eduardo Raimondo (ITA)

Like the original Sunday Times event, the 2018 Golden Globe Race is very simple. Depart Falmouth, England on June 16th 2018 and sail solo, non-stop around the world via the five Great Capes, and return to Falmouth. Entrants are limited to use the same type of yachts and equipment that were available to Robin Knox-Johnston in the first Sunday Times Golden Globe Race.

Published in Solo Sailing
Tagged under

Ireland will have an entry in the 2018 Golden Globe Race, the solo, non-stop around the world race. 

Irish sailor Gregor McGuckin has declared his interest in the race that will have 25 entrants. 

The 24 men and 1 woman – Britain’s Susie Bundegaard Goodall –  have each paid an initial A$3,000 entry fee, though some names remain confidential until sponsorship announcements are made later this month. Other entrants hail from America, Austria, Brazil, Italy, Norway, Palestine, Russia and Switzerland

McGuckin (30) swapped his hiking and climbing boots for sailing gear at the age of 18 and never looked back. For many years he combined both skills teaching at outdoor adventure centres at home and abroad before gaining his Ocean Yachtmaster ticket. Since then he has made several Atlantic and Indian Ocean crossings. Now with more than 35,000 sea miles under his belt, McGuckin is currently skippering a 62ft yacht in the Caribbean.

Background to the Golden Globe Race - Stepping back to the golden age of solo sailing

As Afloat reported previously, just like the original Sunday Times event, the 2018 Golden Globe Race is very simple. Depart Falmouth, England on June 14th 2018 and sail solo, non-stop around the world, via the five Great Capes and return to Falmouth. Entrants are limited to use the same type of yachts and equipment that were available to Robin Knox-Johnston in that first race. That means sailing without modern technology or benefit of satellite based navigation aids. Competitors must sail in production boats between 32ft and 36ft overall (9.75 - 10.97m) designed prior to 1988 and having a full-length keel with rudder attached to their trailing edge. These yachts will be heavily built, strong and steady, similar in concept to Robin's 32ft vessel Suhaili

In contrast to the current professional world of elite ocean racing, this edition travels back to a time known as the 'Golden Age' of solo sailing. Suhaili was a slow and steady 32ft double-ended ketch based on a William Atkins ERIC design. She is heavily built of teak and carried no computers, GPS, satellite phone nor water-maker, and Robin completed the challenge without the aid of modern day shore-based weather routing advice. He had only a wind-up chronometer and a barograph to face the world alone, and caught rainwater to survive, but was at one with the ocean, able to contemplate and absorb all that this epic voyage had to offer. 

This anniversary edition of the Golden Globe Race is a celebration of the original event, the winner, his boat and that significant world-first achievement. Competitors in this race will be sailing simple boats using basic equipment to guarantee a satisfying and personal experience. The challenge is pure and very raw, placing the adventure ahead of winning at all costs. It is for 'those who dare', just as it was for Knox-Johnston. They will be navigating with sextant on paper charts, without electronic instruments or autopilots. They will hand-write their logs and determine the weather for themselves. Only occasionally will they talk to loved ones and the outside world when long-range high frequency and ham radios allow.

It is now possible to race a monohull solo around the world in under 80 days, but sailors entered in this race will spend around 300 days at sea, challenging themselves and each other. The 2018 Golden Globe Race will be a fitting tribute to the first edition and it's winner, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

Safety

The yachts will be tracked 24/7 by satellite, but competitors will not be able to interrogate this information unless an emergency arises and they break open their sealed safety box containing a GPS and satellite phone. Doing this however, has consequences. By breaking the seal, competitors will be deemed to have retired from the Golden Globe Race, and instead will be relegated to the Chichester Class as if they had made a stop.

Provisional entry

For these 25 sailors, this marks the initial stage towards completing all the entry requirements, which include gaining further sailing experience and preparing their boat to meet all the qualifications. Only when these hoops have been jumped will the provisional entrant become an official entry in the Race. Just prior to the start when final scrutineering and certification has been completed, will the sailor and boat together become an official competitor. Then and only then are they absolutely assured of starting in the Golden Globe Race.

Published in Solo Sailing

#solosailor – Today marks the 46th anniversary of Sir Robin Knox-Johnston's departure from Falmouth UK back in 1968 to become the first person to sail singlehanded non-stop around the world. Of the 9 starters in that Sunday Times Golden Globe Race, Robin and his 32ft ketch rigged yacht Suhaili were the sole finishers.

Six weeks after announcing a second Golden Globe race to mark the 50th anniversary of that remarkable feat, the race organisers have received 50 serious expressions of interest from sailors in17 countries – Australia, Austria, Bermuda, Brazil, Britain, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, USA and Russia.

"The response has been remarkable" says Don McIntyre, adding. "The concept for a retro race in long-keeled monohulls like Suhaili and sailing round the world with nothing more than the equipment that was available to Robin 5 decades ago, has obviously hit a chord with many people."

McIntyre has received a further 150 letters from people asking for more information. The Race is limited to 30 competitors and the first names will be published on August 1st. Entries close on 31st December 2015.

The 2018 Golden Globe Race is very simple. Depart Falmouth, England on 14th June 2018, sail solo, non-stop around the world via the five Great Capes and return to Falmouth. Entrants are restricted to using the same type of yachts and equipment that were available to Sir Robin in that first race. That means sailing without modern technology or benefit of satellite based navigation aids. Competitors must sail in production boats between 32ft and 36ft overall (9.75 – 10.97m) designed prior to 1988 with a traditional full-length keel with rudder attached to their trailing edge, similar in concept to Knox-Johnston's Suhaili.

Pre-Notice of Race
The Pre-Notice of Race has now been published and lists the 32-36ft long-keeled production boats approved for the race with the addition of Suhaili replicas known as 'ERIC' designs built in wood, steel or fibreglass. The course has also been amended to include additional 'gates' in the Canary Islands, Cape Verde Islands and Falkland Islands for competitors to drop off film, and a southern boundary of 47°S in the Southern Ocean has been set after Kerguelen Island to keep the fleet clear of icebergs.

In addition, prior to the Race, entrants are now required to sail for one day under jury rig made up of two spinnaker poles and an emergency rudder system, and carry all this equipment during the race.

While no digital or satellite technology is allowed, for safety reasons, competitors will be issued with a satellite phone, and tracking system through which they can send two 100 character text messages a day directly to the race organisers. All other communications have to be made via HF radio, just as Sir Robin Knox-Johnston used during the 1968/9 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race.

For further information go to www.goldengloberace.com

Published in Solo Sailing

#goldengloberace – To mark the 50th anniversary of the first solo non-stop circumnavigation under sail achieved by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston during the 1968/9 Sunday Times Golden Globe Yacht Race, a new Golden Globe Race is set to start from Falmouth UK on June 14, 2018 – the same day that Knox-Johnston set out on his epic voyage 50 years before.

The announcement today is significant, marking the 46th anniversary of Robin's victorious return to Falmouth in 1969, as the sole finisher in the original Sunday Times event.

The 2018 Golden Globe Race is very simple. Depart Falmouth, England, sail solo, non-stop around the world via the five Great Capes and return to Falmouth. Entrants are restricted to using the same type of yachts and equipment that were available to Sir Robin in that first race. That means sailing without modern technology or benefit of satellite based navigation aids. Competitors must sail in production boats between 32ft and 36ft overall (9.75 – 10.97m) designed prior to 1988 with a full-length keel with rudder attached to their trailing edge, similar in concept to Knox-Johnston's Suhaili.

Australian adventurer Don McIntyre, founder of this 2018 Race says: "The overriding aim is for a race where adventure takes precedence over winning at all costs; one where sailing skill and traditional seamanship, rather than modern technology and outside support, gets you round, and where the achievement truly belongs to the skipper."

McIntyre who completed his first solo circumnavigation in 1991 and more recently retraced Capt. Bligh's Bounty Boat voyage from Tonga to Kupang, West Timor in a similar open boat with minimal rations. He intends to compete in the Race with his Tradewind 35 Betty, one of 13 traditional production yacht types approved for this race.

Another entrant is British yachtsman and adventurer Chris Jacks from Liverpool. Last Autumn, he climbed the summits of 92 Wainwright mountains within 40 days – equivalent to climbing Mount Everest twice.

Two more sailors, one from Australia, the other from Germany, have so far expressed keen interest to compete and are currently finalising their plans. The 2018 Race is limited to a maximum of 20 entrants.

The challenge is pure and very raw for those who 'dare', just as it was for Sir Robin, navigating with sextant on paper charts, without electronic instruments or autopilots.

Sir Robin Knox-Johnston says: "I'm a great believer in the freedom of the individual. I think this race is a great idea, giving an opportunity for those who want to do something special with their lives. You can enter this race in an ordinary seaworthy boat and know that success will be down to personal drive and determination, and not to the biggest budget. I intend to be at the start with Suhaili to celebrate this anniversary and expect to be joined by two other yachts that competed in the original Sunday Times Race."

A prize purse of £75,000 has been budgeted for the 2018 Golden Globe Race, and all who finish before 15:25hrs on 22nd April 2019 (the anniversary of Sir Robin Knox-Johnston's finish) will receive a Suhaili trophy and a refund of their entry fee.

Published in Solo Sailing
Page 2 of 2

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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