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Displaying items by tag: Weather

What is the number one topic of conversation in Ireland? We all know the answer: It’s the weather. We also know that the forecasts we hear on the radio or see on the telly are, shall we say, not always quite accurate. Some might even say they are only valid for Dublin. And when have you ever heard ‘them’ say “there will be sunshine spreading from the west”? Wait no longer. Now you can go to the Mayo Sailing Club website to get a full picture of what the weather is doing now and about to do in the near future.

MSC MenuMayoSailingClub.com website showing the menu to the Anemometer

In County Mayo, those in the know have long relied on resources other than the weather service to get their fix. For years, the Mayo Sailing Club (MSC) anemometer has been used by the RNLI and Coastguard as well as many fishermen and farmers for an accurate picture of what is happening with the wind on Clew Bay at a given time. Windguru has also been a favourite for local weather forecasts with people checking out the Bertra and Mulranny “spots”.

WinguruLocation of the Mayo Sailing Club weather station on Inishlyre Island in Clew Bay

Windguru was originally conceived for surfers who wanted accurate weather and wave forecasts. Whereas there are many “spots” where Windguru forecasts can be looked up on the web or in the app, there have to date only been seven actual weather “stations” where wind, rain and temperature data is collected and used in their forecasting models; these were in the east and south of the country. The forecasts for the weather “spots” here in Clew Bay and elsewhere were extrapolated from these remote “stations”.

MSC AnemometerThe current weather at the Mayo Sailing Club weather station on Inishlyre Island in Clew Bay under the ‘Quick View Summary’ tab

Westport is now the centre of weather forecasting for the Wild Atlantic Way

Mayo Sailing Club has completed a significant upgrade to its weather station. By upgrading the physical weather station technology, the detailed live data from the station can now be shared with global weather forecasting networks such as Windguru. This is a significant development as it means that visitors to MayoSailingClub.com and users of Windguru can now get detailed and accurate information on the weather we are currently experiencing as well as on the trends that led to this, resulting in much more accurate predictions as to the weather we are likely to get in the coming hours and days. To view the data, which includes current wind strength, wind direction, variability of wind direction, precipitation (rain), cloud cover, temperature, air pressure, and light levels, as well as the current webcam view from Inishlyre Island, just navigate to the MSC Anemometer page and click on “Detailed View & Graphs”.

MSC WindGuruA sample of the ‘Windguru forecast’ tab showing the longer range GFS 27 prediction and the ICON 7 three day prediction.

MSC Detailed ViewThe current weather at the Mayo Sailing Club weather station on Inishlyre Island in Clew Bay under the ‘Quick View Summary’ tab

Current Weather and Forecasts

A visitor may also click on the “Windguru Forecast” tab to get a detailed forecast. This is based on the actual current situation and trends. It is therefore as accurate as it can be based on the most current meteorological prediction models. Usefully for Ireland, it also includes rainfall predictions. While this data can appear a little daunting at first, what you are seeing are several different weather prediction models which are summarised below:

GFS Model

GFS stands for the Global Forecast System. It is run by National Centers for Environmental Prediction, USA. The GFS is run four times per day and is a global model so it covers the entire Earth! Since January 2015 GFS produce forecasts with resolution of 27 km out to 240 hours.

WRF Model

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is also US based. It is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system designed to serve both operational forecasting and atmospheric research needs.

ICON Model

The European Global ICON Model is the newest and some would argue, the most accurate. ICON 13 covers the planet and offers forecasts in 3 hour steps for the next 180 hours, updated 4 times per day. The regional ICON 7 model with 7 km resolution covers Europe with forecasts in 1 hour steps for the next 78 hours.

Remember, these are different computer programs using the currently available information to predict the future, so inevitably their predictions will differ slightly. Despite that, you may be surprised by just how reliable they are – particularly the ICON 7 and WRF 9 models, which give you the next three days. They will often accutately predict rainfall to the hour. The fact that these predictions are now using live information gathered by Mayo Sailing Club means that the forecasts will be much more reliable than in the past when they were extrapolated from weather stations that were hundreds of miles away. The next time you chat with friends and family about the weather you will have the opportunity to dazzle and amaze with your own astonishingly accurate predictions!
Location

Courtesy of the Gibbons Family of Inishlyre Island, the Ultrasonic Anemometer has been located 27 meters above sea level on the island’s summit 53° 49.5'N 9° 39'W. This provides a clear view of all quarters enabling a representative sampling of the local wind in Clew Bay.

Principle of Operation

The can-sized wind sensor measures the time taken for an ultrasonic pulse of sound to travel from the North transducer to the South transducer and compares this with the time for a pulse to travel from S to N transducer. Likewise, times are compared between the W and E and the E and W transducers. If for example, a Northerly wind is blowing, then time taken for the pulse of sound to travel from N to S will be faster than from S to N, whereas the E to W and W to E times will be the same. The wind speed and direction are then calculated from the differences in the times of flight on each axis. This calculation is independent of error sources such as temperature and mechanical friction etc. Being solid state (no moving parts) the anemometer is virtually maintenance free. It is powered by battery which is kept charged by a large solar panel.

Using a data logger and a modem the data is sent via GPRS and the internet to a remote computer where the Wind Speed and Direction for the last 8 hours are displayed on two graphs which scroll forward with time.

Data is collected every 30 seconds and the graphs are updated every 5 minutes when the remote computer polls the data logger. These real-time graphs are available on www.mayosailingclub.com for members and guests to check the current local weather at Clew Bay anytime. This is an important safety feature for members and the general public who use Clew Bay.

For more information on what the weather is going to be like visit: www.mayosailingclub.com

Published in Weather
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As expected 'The Beast from the East' arrived through the night and forecasters now say this severe winter weather is considered very likely to last a week or longer. It's time to check the boat and avoid the five most common wintersing mistakes for boatowners.

A snow-ice warning has been issue for Dublin, Kildare, Louth, Wicklow and Meath. 

Heavy overnight snowfall has led to accumulations of snow between 5 and 10cm. Snow showers will continue to occur during today and again tonight with further accumulations. Total snowfall up to midday Thursday may reach 25cm.

Like everyone else, sailing clubs and marine trade are coping with the effects of the snowfall. Among some early postponements  of events is Friday's Cork Week launch and tomorrow night's Glenua Presentation “From the Aegean to the Fastnet Race 2017". 

The RStGYC in Dun Laoghaire has notified members that the clubhouse is closed today and until the removal of the weather warning. The National Yacht Club will close at 3pm.

Current forecasts are for conditions to worsen before improvement with tomorrow and Friday looking like potential blizzard conditions. Add this to the below freezing temperatures and a wind chill of up to -11c tomorrow morning it is time to batten down the hatches.

Details of what's next on the weather front are of course sketchy but the depth of cold air over Ireland means temperatures are well below freezing, and that further snowfall is a strong possibility in the east, south and perhaps coastal areas of north and west as well, and we are seeing some charts on the most reliable models that are real jaw-droppers for snowfall potential.

Here's some updates via social media from around the coast: 

A Red Weather Warning has been put into effect by Met Éireann. Insurers Allianz say stay safe and observe all advice from state agencies.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour based MGM Boats has been busy making desktop snowmen...

Viking Marine in Dun Laoghaire are selling sledges...

And in Cork Harbour, Eddie English predicts temperatures as low as minus 5....

The CH Marine chandlery has been forced to close in Cork today but the Skibbereen branch IS open....

Published in Marine Warning
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#Rowing: Competition in the Cork Sculling Ladder has been postponed this weekend because of the forecast of bad weather. The organisers have chosen Sunday, October 29th, as the date for the next action in the event. Jack Dorney of Shandon and Margaret Cremen of Lee top the rankings after the time trials.

Published in Rowing

As Ireland braces itself for stormy conditions next week, photographer John Coveney captured waves breaking over the Great South Wall at Poolbeg on Dublin Bay during yesterday's Southeasterly Gale. 

Met Eireann say South to southwest winds will continue to occasionally reach gale force 8 for a time this morning on Irish Coastal waters from Erris Head to Bloody Foreland to Fair Head.
The outlook for a further 24 hours until 0600, Sunday is for moderate to fresh west or southwest winds becoming southwesterly everywhere on Saturday afternoon. Winds veering west to northwest on south and west coasts late Saturday and early Sunday. 

Published in Dublin Bay
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#Weather - Batten down the hatches: the West of Ireland is in for a windy one this coming Monday night (5 February).

The latest maps from Dark Sky show a large weather mass of high winds barrelling across the Atlantic from the west on Monday evening, reaching the Wild Atlantic Way after midnight.

Before that, Met Éireann warns to expect of heavy rain and windy weather nationwide with strong southeast winds.

Published in Weather
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#CoastalNotes - Coastal defences and protections against flooding are outlined in a new Department of Transport plan to prepare Ireland for future climate change, as The Irish Times reports.

The draft consultation report, Developing Resilience to Climate Change in the Irish Transport Sector, details measures such as coastal flood defences at Shannon Airport and the railway line at Rosslare Harbour, the latter of which is inching ever closer to the cliff on the eroding shoreline.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the East Coast line suffered significant damage north of Wicklow town during last month’s Storm Angus.

Predicted rises in temperatures and sea level over the next century are expected to bring more of such storms, with heavier rainfalls and an increased risk of flooding and landslides in prone areas.

All of this has prompted the new plan to identify key remedial works for future-proofing the country’s transport infrastructure.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes

#IrishSea - “Averse conditions in the Irish Sea” have prompted the cancellation of six Irish Ferries sailings between Dublin and Holyhead tomorrow (Friday 23 December), as The Irish Times reports.

Passengers scheduled to travel from Dublin on the 8.45am and 10.45am ferries are advised to catch the 8.05am departure instead, while afternoon travellers are asked to make their trip later on the 8.05pm or 8.55pm sailing.

Those coming from Holyhead at 11.50am, meanwhile, will be accommodated on the next sailing some two hours later, though late afternoon travellers will have to wait till the early hours of Saturday morning (24 December).

The cancellations come as Storm Barbara sweeps in from the North Atlantic across the north of Scotland, bringing with it a high risk of stormy weather conditions in the coastal counties of Connacht and Ulster.

Published in Ferry

#Weather - Met Éireann has announced a Status Yellow small craft warning for strong gales in effect today (Wednesday 21 December) ahead of Storm Barbara’s expected arrival at the weekend.

Southwest winds will reach Force 8 at times this evening and tonight on coasts from Slyne Head to Rossan Point to Fair Head.

That’s before the deep Atlantic depression, the second winter storm of the current season, tracks eastwards well to the north of Scotland, bringing wet and windy weather across Ireland — and the risk of stormy conditions in the coastal counties of Connacht and Ulster.

Achill Island Coast Guard advises mariners and residents in these areas to expect at least an Status Orange weather warning this Friday, as the projected Force 10 winds are forecast to last up to 24 hours, according to the Connacht Telegraph.

Published in Weather

#RisingSeaLevels - Rising sea levels around Ireland due to climate change are almost 7cm since the early 1990s.

The Irish Examiner writes that this is due to the rising temperature of the planet, greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) and the melting of glaciers.

And the next five to 15 years is a crucial time period within which to act if we want to halt any permanent changes to the planet.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), climate change is most obvious in our changing sea levels.

The newspaper also writes that the number of high quality rivers has halved.

“Observed climate change impacts are most evident in the global temperature record, sea-level rise, loss of glaciers and ice sheets and changes in the nature and intensification of precipitation events,” the EPA report states.

“Since 1993, average sea level has risen around Ireland by just over 3cm per decade,” the report reads.

For further coverage the newspaper has more here 

Published in Weather

#Weather - The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company advises of a new location for the harbour's weather station, which had been inactive since 6 June this year.

Live weather data can now again be found on www.dlhweather.com (times given in GMT).

Published in Weather
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