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Inland Waterway News. Boating on Ireland's Rivers, Lakes and Canals
River Liffey All in a Row organiser Dave Kelly with the IUSRU at the prizegiving at the Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club
The All In A Row Liffey Challenge was held in early December on the capital’s River Liffey with the challenge for the rowers to smash a 1,000km target in eight hours. Fifty skiffs, kayaks, canoes, dragon boats and currachs were…
Artist’s impression of the Athy Distributor Road bridge being constructed over the Barrow Navigation
Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and waterways users on the Barrow Navigation that the construction of the Athy Distributor Road Bridge has progressed to stage three with the bridge deck installation. Resulting from this, new navigation and pedestrian…
Launching The Grand Canal Recreation Report on Friday 27 January were Louise Dredge of Waterways Ireland with kayakers Paul Galvin and Barry Crombie
Waterways Ireland and Dublin City Council have launched a new study that considers the outdoor recreation opportunities of the Grand Canal and its towpaths and land resources in Dublin’s south central area. The jointly commissioned report by Irish Leisure Consultants,…
Gary Rogers (left), executive chef at Carton House, with Neven Maguire
On the next episode of Neven’s Greenway Food Trails on RTÉ One, chef Neven Maguire cycles the Royal Canal Greenway west of Maynooth to take in the attractions — culinary and otherwise — along the way. His journey begins at…
The Four Pots is a unique structure located alongside the Grand Canal towpath between the Leinster Aqueduct and Digby Bridge in Co Kildare
Waterways Ireland advises users of the Grand Canal Greenway that the greenway section from Digby Bridge to Sallins in Co Kildare will remain closed until the end of February for continued works on restoring the Four Pots overflow structure. As…
Cruising Club of America Blue Water Medallist Paddy Barry
Cruising Club of America Blue Water Medallist Paddy Barry and Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association President Adrian Spence have taken on the Arctic cruising challenge in a variety of craft over the years. But in 2022, they combined forces to…
A white-tailed sea eagle which was brought to Ireland as a chick from Norway was poisoned, the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) has confirmed. The bird had been a healthy juvenile male but was found dead on lands between…
The former Aran Islands ferry Naomh Eanna listing heavily on Saturday inher berth off Dublin's Grand Canal Basin
The long saga of the future of the former Galway to Aran Islands ferry ship Naomh Eanna entered a new chapter during the recent cold snap, when she began to take on a list through the ingress of water into…
Artist’s impression of the Athy Distributor Road bridge being constructed over the Barrow Navigation
Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and waterways users on the Barrow Navigation that the construction of the Athy Distributor Road bridge is under way and has progressed to the stage where interaction with navigation and trackway users is…
These cleats are specially made to match the existing, traditional cast iron canal mooring posts installed in the nineteenth century
New ‘traditional’ mooring cleats will be on the quay wall jetty in Leitrim village for the upcoming new River Shannon boating season. These cleats are specially made to match the existing, traditional cast iron canal mooring posts installed in the…
Map showing Inchmore Island
Following the pre-Christmas warning over an off-station marker on the Shannon Navigation, Waterways Ireland advises that a temporary red marker has now been installed in the relevant area north of Athlone. The temporary marker is in place of the port-hand…
equipment and training is a significant annual expense
The year just ended was a significant one for Lough Ree RNLI, both on and off the water. 2022 witnessed the opening of the charity’s ‘state of the art’ lifeboat station while on the water the volunteer crew responded to…
Conservation and sustainability in Salmon angling are vital to addressing environmental, climate and biodiversity challenges
The Minister for the Environment, Climate and Communications, Eamon Ryan TD, has approved legislation that will govern the wild salmon and sea trout fisheries in 2023. These will come into effect from Sunday, 1st January 2023. Minister Ryan said: “81…
Map showing Inchmore Island
Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users the Shannon Navigation at Lough Ree that a port hand lateral marker on the south side of Inchmore Island is currently off station. Masters of vessels should proceed with additional caution…
Portora Lock outside Enniskillen
Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users on the Erne System of the following in relation to the operation of Portora sluice gates near Enniskillen in Northern Ireland over the Christmas period: If the sluice gates are in…
File image of the Grand Canal at Clondalkin Bridge
Waterways Ireland advises users of the Grand Canal in West Dublin that the greenway section from the 8th Lock at Fox and Geese to the 9th Lock in Clondalkin will now be closed from Tuesday 3 January to Friday 10…

Whether you're a boat enthusiast, historian, archaeologist, fisherman, or just taken by the natural beauty of Ireland's waterways, you will find something of interest in our Inland pages on Afloat.ie.

Inland Waterways

Ireland is lucky to have a wealth of river systems and canals crossing the country that, while once vital for transporting goods, are today equally as important for angling, recreational boating and of course tourism.

From the Barrow Navigation to the Erne System, the Grand Canal, the Lower Bann, the Royal Canal, the Shannon-Erne Waterway and the Shannon Navigation, these inland waterways are popular year in, year out for anyone with an interest in rambling; flora and fauna; fishing; sailing; motorboating; canoeing, kayaking and waterskiing; and cruising on narrowboats.

Although most will surely identify Ireland's inland waterways with boating holidays and a peaceful afternoon's angling, many varieties of watersport are increasingly favoured activities. Powerboat and Jetski courses abound, as do opportunities for waterskiing or wakeboarding. For those who don't require engine power, there's canoeing and kayaking, as Ireland's waterways have much to offer both recreational paddlers and those looking for more of a challenge. And when it comes to more sedate activities, there's nothing like going for a walk along a canal or river bank following some of the long-distance Waymarked Ways or Slí na Sláinte paths that criss-cross the country.

Ireland's network of rivers, lakes and canals is maintained by Waterways Ireland, which is one of the six North/South Implementation Bodies established under the British-Irish Agreement in 1999. The body has responsibility for the management, maintenance, development and restoration of inland navigable waterways on the island of Ireland, principally for recreational purposes. It also maintains Ireland's loughs, lakes and channels which are sought after for sailing; the network of canal locks and tow paths; as well as any buoys, bridges and harbours along the routes.

Along the Grand and Royal Canals and sections of the Barrow Navigation and the Shannon-Erne Waterway, Waterways Ireland is also responsible for angling activities, and charges Inland Fisheries Ireland with carrying out fisheries development, weed management and ensuring water quality.

Brian Goggin's Inland Blog

Giving his personal perspective on Ireland's Inland Waterways from present-day activities to their rich heritage, Brian Goggin tells it like it is with his Inland Blog.

From recognising achievements in management of the waterways to his worries on the costs of getting afloat on Ireland's canals, Goggin always has something important to say.

He also maintains the website Irish Waterways History that serves as a repository for a wealth of historical accounts of the past commercial and social uses alike of Ireland's rivers and canals, which were once the lifeblood of many a rural community.