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Milestone for Belfast Cranes Samson and Goliath

15th November 2018
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Half a century ago construction began on Goliath, then the largest crane in the world which formed the first of the giant shipbuilding cranes in Belfast at the Harland & Wolff yard. The second crane Samson soon followed to become iconic symbols of the city's industrial pride and heritage known throughout the world. Half a century ago construction began on Goliath, then the largest crane in the world which formed the first of the giant shipbuilding cranes in Belfast at the Harland & Wolff yard. The second crane Samson soon followed to become iconic symbols of the city's industrial pride and heritage known throughout the world. Photo: Belfast Harbour -facebook

#BelfastLough - This month 50 years ago, November 1968 the landscape of Belfast was forever changed when a giant yellow crane known as Goliath rose from the Harland and Wolff shipyard.

As BBC News NI recalls, it would be joined soon afterwards by Samson, and the pair formed a key part of the city's skyline.

Their role, however, was more than aesthetic; they were the workhorses that helped develop the city's industrial reputation, facilitating the employment many thousands within Belfast and beyond.

To view historic footage of the iconic crane, click here to a link.  

Could the cranes as Afloat previously covered become tourist attractions? click here 

Published in Belfast Lough
Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

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Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

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