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Cork Harbour: License Sought for Incinerator Despite Ongoing Court Case Over Planning

21st June 2019
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Proposed site location (highlighted with a circle) of the waste-to-energy incinerator plant in Ringaskiddy, Cork Harbour. Afloat adds nearby is the National Maritime College of Ireland (NMCI) and the Naval Service base located on Haulbowline Island. Proposed site location (highlighted with a circle) of the waste-to-energy incinerator plant in Ringaskiddy, Cork Harbour. Afloat adds nearby is the National Maritime College of Ireland (NMCI) and the Naval Service base located on Haulbowline Island. Photo: CHASE Cork Harbour - facebook

A citizen group based in Cork which is against a planned incinerator in Ringaskiddy has criticised Indaver Ireland’s application for an emission licence despite a pending court judgment on the validity of planning permission.

As GreenNews.ie reports, Cork Harbour Alliance for a Safe Environment (CHASE) said that it has been recently informed by Indaver of its plans to proceed with an application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“Indaver are obviously presuming that their permission will stand in advance of any High Court decision, which we believe is a premature assumption,” Mary O’Leary, Chairperson of CHASE said.

Ms O’Leary reiterated the group’s concerns about the health implications of living near an incinerator, reasoning that scientific studies have shown that “particles coming out of incinerators are more toxic than for other combustion processes”.

A new study carried out by Chinese researchers has revealed that fine particles emitting from urban waste-to-energy plants can“contain high amount of toxic compounds and pose a serious threat to environment and human health”.

The High Court commenced hearing the controversial incinerator case earlier in March with no final judgment issued yet.

For further reading on this story click here.

Published in Cork Harbour
Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

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Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

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It’s one of the largest natural harbours in the world – and those living near Cork Harbour insist that it’s also one of the most interesting.

This was the last port of call for the most famous liner in history, the Titanic, but it has been transformed into a centre for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

The harbour has been a working port and a strategic defensive hub for centuries, and it has been one of Ireland's major employment hubs since the early 1900s. Traditional heavy industries have waned since the late 20th century, with the likes of the closure of Irish Steel in Haulbowline and shipbuilding at Verolme. It still has major and strategic significance in energy generation, shipping and refining.

Giraffe wander along its shores, from which tens of thousands of men and women left Ireland, most of them never to return. The harbour is home to the oldest yacht club in the world, and to the Irish Navy. 

This deep waterway has also become a vital cog in the Irish economy. 

 

‘Afloat.ie's Cork Harbour page’ is not a history page, nor is it a news focus. It’s simply an exploration of this famous waterway, its colour and its characters.

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