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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
Ruffles was third in the Ruffian 23 race
132 boats across 20 classes turned out for Saturday's Dublin Bay Sailing Club Race.  In the big cruiser division, the First 40 Prima Forte was the IRC Zero winner from  XP 44 WOW and the Beneteau 44.7 Lively Lady.  IRC…
The Goodbody family of Dun Laoghaire have been remarkably successful in making the best of 2020's shortened season. On Thursday evening their J/109 White Mischief emerged as overall winner of Cruisers 1 in the DBSC Thursday Series under both IRC and ECHO, and they also were champion J/109. Meanwhile in August, Richard Goodbody and his 16-year-old son Max crewed aboard Chris & Patanne Power-Smith's J/122 Aurelia to take line honours and third overall in the Fastnet 450
Even Dublin Bay Sailing Club, with all its remarkable expertise and sheer firepower, has been unable to slow Planet Earth in its daily rotation, let alone alter the steady changing of our little solar satellite's endlessly shifting tilt as it…
Fishing for crab and lobster on Dublin Bay - Cultural heritage is associated with the sea, fishing and small-scale fleets
Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency, is to host a webinar on Wednesday 9th September 2020 at 2 pm on how the role of cultural values can be integrated more in small-scale fisheries management. The webinar, which will…
The start of ISORA's night race off Dun Laoghaire Harbour. See video below
ISORA Champion Rockabill VI was the overall winner of Friday's 40-mile night race. Although short on entries, the seven boat fleet was made up of the leading contenders for this year's Irish ISORA overall prize. It was the defending champion,…
The passenger ferryboat service to Dalkey Island in south Dublin Bay is not operating following the partial collapse of the cliff within Coliemore Harbour resulting in the closure of the harbour' s access walkway path to the ferry-pier and the Dalkey Rowing Club boathouse (also above) due to health and safety grounds. On the right can be seen the gap where a large rock became dislodged, dropped directly into the water below.
The popular Dalkey Island seasonal ferryboat has stopped service due to a partial collapse of a cliff-face underneath a footpath leading to the pier at Coliemore Harbour, Co. Dublin, writes Jehan Ashmore. The ferry operator, Ken Cunningham said "unfortunately due…
A moment of inspiration recalled at Sutton Dinghy Club's Junior Training – Annalise Murphy wins her Silver Medal in Rio, August 2016
Olympic Silver Medallist Annalise Murphy took a break from her training routine towards the 2021 Olympics this (Wednesday) morning when she hopped into her sponsored Mercedes SUV to see the successful COVID-compliant Junior set up put together by Hugh Gill…
Anglers perched on the rocks on the Dalkey coastline
For the second weekend running in August, anglers on the south shore of Dublin Bay have been taking a bountiful supply of mackerel on feathers, especially on the southern tip of the Bay at Dalkey Island where shoals of sprat…
What a Lump - On the dock at Dun Laoghaire Marina
Normally found in the cold waters of the Arctic, North Atlantic, and North Pacific ocean, this unusual-looking lumpsucker fish was discovered on the dock at Dun Laoghaire Marina on Dublin Bay this morning. "The Icelandic fish them for their eggs,…
Competitors in a previous Dun Laoghaire Harbour Swim
The 90th edition of the annual Dun Laoghaire Harbour Swim is scheduled for the morning of Sunday 16 August. The National Yacht Club’s notice requests that all harbour users keep clear of the swimmers on the day — this includes…
Stella a former Dutch canal-cargo barge in this file photo when initially the vessel was berthed at the pierhead of the Old Pier (dating to 1767) which as the name suggests is Dun Laoghaire Harbour's oldest. The barge subsequently was relocated to the adjacent Coal Harbour. Take a closer look above the West Pier were the funnel and upper superstructure of a Seatruck Ferries 'P' class ro-ro freighter is seen underway having departed neighbouring Dublin Port and when bound to Britain, either Heysham or Liverpool.
During a self-imposed 'semi' day-off which took place on this day last week, several small 'motor'-powered vessels were observed during a brief visit to the marina in Dun Laoghaire Harbour and environs, writes Jehan Ashmore. It was in Dun Laoghaire…
Developers Bartra Property Group proposed to build three 3-story luxury villas and two apartments as well as a cafe on the site at Bulloch Harbour (above) in AFLOAT's file photo is a closer-up view compared to Dublin Live's coverage. On right colourful timber-built fishing related huts and the former boat-hoist crane since dismantled. In the background TUI Cruises Mein Schiff 1 while at anchor off Dun Laoghaire Harbour which was scheduled this year to receive a record 22 calls but due to Covid-19 fallout, only two cruiseship calls are expected this season.
In south Dublin Bay campaigners against a luxury development at Bulloch Harbour, Dalkey have been celebrating after planning permission for the controversial coastal mansions was quashed last week. An Bord Pleanala has conceded the judicial review brought by the association,…
Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI Assist Three People on a 35ft Yacht off Dublin Bay
At 10:21 am today (Saturday 18 July), Dublin Coast Guard requested Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI to assist three people on board a 35ft yacht which had its propeller fouled approximately two miles of the Dublin coast. The all-weather lifeboat was…
More Time To Fly Your Flag At Dun Laoghaire Harbour
Dun Laoghaire’s local authority has extended the deadline to take part in its summer flag-making initiative. As previously reported on Afloat.ie, locals of all ages are invited tell their own Covid-19 story with a flag of their own making. Submitted…
Coastguard and lifeboat crews attending the scene at the Forty Foot yesterday
Dun Laoghaire’s coastguard unit was tasked yesterday (Sunday 12 July) to assist paramedics with a casualty who had fallen down steps at the Forty Foot bathing spot. Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s inshore lifeboat was also in attendance at the scene, where…
Busy times in the great days of sail at the entrance to Dun Laoghaire (Kingstown) Harbour in a fresh to strong east sou’east wind, as painted by Admiral Richard Brydges Beechey, with a working cutter towing a hobblers’ boat entering as two yachts leave, while a stately naval man o’ war comes down the harbour, setting sail as she goes.
Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association invites you to join their next Zoom session on Historic Dublin Bay Gaff Rigged Vessels from Maritime Paintings and Photographs, which will be given by Cormac Lowth on Thursday 16th July. Dublin’s leading maritime historian…
Dun Laoghaire Baths project in Scotsman's Bay
Shoreward photography taken at the weekend of the new Dun Laoghaire Baths shows that significant progress has been made in all areas of but overall progress is slower than anticipated meaning the project that began two years ago will not…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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