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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
Full access - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens again to berth holders on May 18
In line with government guidelines for Public sports amenities, Dun Laoghaire Marina will provide full access to its berth holders in ten days time. While the country's biggest marina - with over 500 berths - has been open, manned and fully…
Dun Laoghaire RNLI
Dun Laoghaire RNLI came to the aid of two people who got into difficulty on a kayak this morning. The volunteer lifeboat crew were paged at 8.21 am following an initial report from the Irish Coast Guard that two men…
Yachts racing on Dublin Bay - a new solidarity regatta of all Dun Laoghaire yacht clubs has been announced for July 31st
A new Dublin Bay regatta involving the whole Dun Laoghaire sailing waterfront has been announced for July 31st to August 3rd.  The 'Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs Solidarity Regatta 2020' is an initiative of all five of Dun Laoghaire's yacht clubs…
The ultra champion – Paul O’Higgins’ JPK 10.80 Rockabill VI is currently ICRA Boat of the Year, Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Champion, ISORA Champion and Calves Week Champion, while he is Afloat.ie/Irish Sailing “Sailor of the Year”. If the tentative proposal to resume sailing with the ISORA Dublin Bay to Cork Harbour Race at the later date of Friday, July 31st is implemented, Rockabill VI and her crew could be campaigning almost continually from July 31st until the conclusion of the ICRA Nationals in the Wave Regatta at Howth from September 11th to 13th
The postponed date of Friday, July 31st is being considered as a feasible time to think of starting the ISORA-organised 160-mile Dublin Bay to Cork Harbour Race, which was originally planned for July 9th to link this summer’s celebration of…
The new Roger Casement statue destined for a plinth at the end of the swim jetty at Dun Laoghaire Baths. Scroll down for photo
A special plinth has been completed on Dun Laoghaire's newest pier at the old Victorian baths site for the statue of Roger Casement. In 2016, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council commissioned a statue of the Irish nationalist, who was sentenced to death…
Swimming is off at the Forty Foot until further notice
Popular bathing spots at the Forty Foot, Sandycove and Seapoint on Dublin Bay have been closed as of today (Saturday 11 April) following the latest extension of restrictions against Covid-19. Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council said the decision was made “following…
A vew from the west looking at Dun Laoghaire town and its harbour
Donal O'Sullivan muses on the implications of a forgotten financial scandal at Dun Laoghaire Harbour John Rennie, the eminent Scottish engineer who drew up the original plans for Dun Laoghaire Harbour, was destined never to see them come to fruition.…
The former ferry terminal at Dun Laoghaire Harbour
A Dun Laoghaire senator has suggested that the currently vacant ferry terminal at the south Dublin harbour be employed as a Covid-19 testing centre. In a letter to Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council chief executive Philomena Poole, as seen by Afloat.ie,…
Racing in the DBSC Spring Chicken Series
Next week's final race of the Dublin Bay Sailing Club's Citroen South Spring Chicken Series and prizegiving have been postponed until September and it will be 'reviewed' at that time. The decision for the National Yacht Club hosted event comes…
Habour2Harbour - The event, which last year attracted over 1,800 participants, will be rescheduled for a later date in the Autumn
In the interests of public health and to further minimise large gatherings of people, Aware and Dublin Port Company have decided to postpone the annual St. Patrick’s Day Harbour2Harbour fundraising walk, including the ‘Halfway Hooley’ at Dublin Port. The event,…
The new jetty nears completion at the old baths site on Scotsman's Bay
Works continue apace at Dublin Bay's newest pier and small boat facility at Dun Laoghaire.  Work on the new jetty, works to the new sea walls, works to the Pavillion and works to tie into the existing walkway at Newtownsmith…
Dublin Port Company chief Eamonn O’Reilly with Lord Mayor of Dublin Tom Brabazon and Dominic Layden, CEO of Aware, at the Port Plaza for the launch of this year’s Harbour2Harbour Walk
Newly elected Lord Mayor of Dublin Tom Brabazon has launched the 15th annual Aware Harbour2Harbour Walk, which will take place on St Patrick’s Day, Tuesday 17 March, from 10.30am. Over 2,000 enthusiastic walkers are expected to take on the 16.2…
CYBC Ribbon Cutting: Richard Bruton TD, Aidan Cronin, Edel Currie and Richard Nolan at the ceremony
Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club have just celebrated the completion of key renovation work with an official ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by special guests and supporters, Edel Currie of Dublin Port, Minister Richard Bruton and Richard Nolan of Nolan’s Supermarket. Welcoming…
Walrus colony – Hinlopen Strait, Spitsbergen.
The next Glenua lecture, in aid of the RNLI, is to be held on Thursday 5 March (20.00) at the Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club, Ringsend, Dublin. Entry contribution of €5 in aid of the RNLI. I would appreciate your…
Dun Laoghaire Harbour: A barge laden with Cornish granite is moved by a pair of tugs, AMS Retriever and Vanguard in advance of towage to off the port's East Pier where operations took place to discharge rock-armour due to damage caused by Storm Emma in 2018.
Works have recently begun to repair damage in Dun Laoghaire Harbour caused by a storm from almost two years ago, however further bad weather looms as Storm Dennis is to sweep in this weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore. As Afloat reported in…
Construction of the new Fastnet Lighthouse which took place between 1896-1904
The next Glenua lecture is to be held this coming Thursday 6th February (and not the following week as previously advertised).  The venue will be at Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club, Ringsend, Dublin and where an entry contribution of €5…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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