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Displaying items by tag: Wexford

#RNLI - Wexford RNLI rescued two people late on Monday night (26 August) after their yacht went aground on a sandbank on the way into Wexford Harbour.

The volunteer lifeboat crew responded to the report of the yacht which had grounded near Ravens Point around midnight on Monday.
 
Weather conditions at the time were good with a calm sea state and a north westerly force three wind.

But a fast-flowing tide of four knots meant that the inshore lifeboat and crew of the yacht had to work hard to refloat that boat.

Wexford RNLI lifeboat helm Peter Scallan commended the action of the yacht's crew, who he said were experienced sailors.

"The yacht's crew had taken all the correct precautions with the appropriate equipment on board to ensure their safety. They co-operated greatly with the lifeboat crew and as a result both they and their yacht were rescued." 
 


Lifeboat crew member Alan Keville went onboard the vessel to assist in the manoeuvre to get the yacht off the sandbank, which involved using the mast to get the vessel on its side as the keel was stuck hard in the sandbank. The yacht was under tow at 1.14am and back in Wexford at 2.30am.


Elsewhere, the Courtown lifeboat launched on Sunday afternoon (25 August) to a report of a swimmer missing off Ardamine beach.

The lifeboat crew, who were in the harbour at the time, launched within minutes and commenced a search of the area. Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 117 was also tasked to the scene, along with the Courtown coastguard unit.

After a thorough search of the area between Glasscarrig and Courtown pier, all rescue services were stood down as nothing was found. Courtown RNLI thanked all the members of public who helped and provided information during the call out.

The day before, the Wicklow RNLI inshore and all-weather lifeboats were launched after a member of the public reported seeing a small craft with two people drifting off Brittas Bay beach.

While the lifeboats were on route to Brittas Bay, they were requested to stand down and return to station by the coastguard as the boaters managed to make their own way ashore.

Speaking after the call-out, Wicklow RNLI lifeboat operations manager Des Davitt said: "While this turned out to be a false alarm with good intent, we are delighted that the public are being vigilant and contact the coastguard immediately when they suspect someone is in trouble on the water."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - It was a busy afternoon for RNLI lifeboats on the east coast on Thursday 8 August with separate call-outs in Wicklow and Wexford.

Wicklow RNLI's all weather lifeboat Annie Blaker was launched at 3.15pm to answer a call for assistance from a lone yachtsman experiencing mechanical difficulties off Wicklow Head.

As the crew assembled at the station, another call for assistance was received from a boat with four people in the same area.



The lifeboat launched immediately and located the small boat with four on board near Brides Head a short time later, but the occupants were in no immediate danger, so no further assistance was required as the boat was able to return safely to more sheltered waters under its own power. 



The lifeboat then proceeded to the stricken yacht, located about two miles east of Wicklow Head shortly after 3.30pm. Weather conditions in the area at the time were described Force 4 with a south west wind.

The boat with the lone sailor was escorted back to Wicklow by the lifeboat. One of the lifeboat crew was transferred onto the yacht outside the harbour to assist with mooring the boat alongside the east pier.


Meanwhile in Co Wexford, the volunteer lifeboat crew at Rosslare Harbour RNLI launched their all weather lifeboat at 11am to assist an 11-metre fishing boat in difficulty.



The Arklow boat became entangled in fishing gear while north of Raven Point on the Wexford coast and lost all power. The fishing boat contacted the coastguard and the Rosslare Harbour RNLI lifeboat was launched and quickly on scene.

The weather conditions were described as good with a southerly Force 3 wind.



The lifeboat crew took the fishing vessel under tow as far as Cahore Point where the Arklow RNLI all-weather lifeboat took over the tow and brought them on to Arklow.



Speaking after the call-out, Rosslare RNLI volunteer deputy press officer Jamie Ryan said: “The emergency services reacted swiftly and help was on scene quickly. The three fishermen took the correct action in contacting the coastguard."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - Kilmore Quay RNLI has assisted a fisherman after his boat got into difficulty off the Wexford coast, while Wicklow RNLI attended to a fishing boat in trouble south of Wicklow Harbour.

The Kilmore Quay all-weather lifeboat was requested to launch at 9.04am on Monday morning (29 July) to go to the assistance of a local lobster boat with one person on board,

The fishing boat had fouled its propeller while hauling pots a mile to the south-east of the Little Saltee Island.



Weather conditions at the time were blowing a light southerly breeze and there was good visibility.

When the lifeboat arrived on scene, a tow was set up and the vessel was brought safely to the harbour at Kilmore Quay.

Shortly afterwards, Wicklow RNLI launched at 9.30am in response to a call for assistance from a fishing vessel in difficulties six miles south of Wicklow Harbour.

The vessel with three crew was fishing north of Brittas Bay beach when a rope got fouled in the propeller and she lost steering. The skipper contacted the coastguard for assistance.



Wicklow town's lifeboat, under the command of coxswain Nick Keogh, located the vessel drifting close to the Wolf Rock 20 minutes after launching.

A towline was quickly established and the stricken vessel was towed back to Wicklow Harbour, where she was secured safely alongside the East Pier at 10.40am.



The crew on the call out were coxswain Nick Keogh, mechanic Brendan Copeland, Tommy McAulay, Kevin Rahill, Carol Flahive, Paul Sillery and Graham Fitzgerald.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - The volunteer lifeboat crew of the Courtown lifeboat launched last Wednesday evening (24 July) to a report of a small fishing boat that was overdue on its time to return to Cahore Pier.

The Courtown RNLI lifeboat, Cahore Inshore Rescue, the Rosslare RNLI lifeboat and the Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 117 were all tasked at 7pm to search the area of Cahore on the north Wexford coast, where the boat was last reported fishing.

After searching for some time, the small fishing boat made contact to say they had beached their boat some eight miles north of Cahore Pier at Kilgorman Beach. Both men were safe and well and all rescue services were stood down.


The Courtown lifeboat has since urged all boat users carry a proper means of communication - ideally a VHF radio - and to keep friends and family up to date on their location, especially if they decide to change their location.

That same evening, Rosslare Harbour RNLI was involved in a search for two fishermen after they reported getting into difficulty off the Wexford coast.

The volunteer crew launched their all-weather lifeboat at 7.30pm to assist in the search following a request from the coastguard to attend a fishing boat that was reported to be taking on water.



Weather conditions at the time were described as good, with a southerly force three wind.



The fishing boat had set out from Cahore Harbour before getting into trouble. The two crew raised the alarm using a mobile telephone.



Rosslare Harbour RNLI and lifeboats from Courtown RNLI and Cahore, along with the Rescue 117 helicopter, joined in the search.  



At 7.50pm, Rescue 117 located the two fishermen safe and well and their vessel on the beach at Glasgorman, near Cahore.



Speaking after the call-out, Rosslare Harbour RNLI deputy volunteer lifeboat press officer Jamie Ryan said: "The emergency services responded swiftly and were on scene quickly.

"The two fishermen did the right thing by raising the alarm when they got into difficulty and thankfully they were both found safely ashore."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#WaterSafety - Rosslare RNLI has given credit to the quick-thinking member of the public who raised the alarm over what they believed to be a swimmer in difficulty - even though the call-out turned out to be a false alarm.

Lifeboats from Rosslare Harbour and Wexford RNLI were involved in the sea search on Friday evening (19 July) after a swimmer was reported to be in difficulty off Curracloe beach in Co Wexford.

The Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 117 and two local fishing vessels were also involved in the search, which was stood down after an hour and 45 minutes upon coastguard request as no one was reported missing.

Speaking after the call-out, Rosslare RNLI deputy launching authority Dave Maloney said: "The member of the public who raised the alarm this evening deserves credit for doing so."

He added: "We would always encourage the public to alert the emergency services if they see anyone they believe to be in trouble or any signs of danger."

The message is particularly important in a fortnight that has seen a shocking 10 drownings around the island of Ireland - resulting in a big rise in emergency call-outs over the 2012 mid-summer period.

Elsewhere on the same day, the Ballycotton RNLI lifeboat was requested to help search the water off Ballinamona Strand in Ballycotton Bay, Co Cork, for a missing five-year-old girl.

The little girl was playing on the strand when her family lost sight of her.  Emergency services were alerted and a search of the area commenced, but thankfully a short while later the little girl was located safe and well.

In other water safety news, the Irish Coast Guard has issued a public appeal for help locating a training mannequin that was lost in Galway Bay during an exercise off Blackhead in North Clare last week.

The Connacht Tribune reports that five coastguard mannequins were placed in the water to acts as people who jumped overboard from a ship fire - but only four were recovered afterwards.

Published in Water Safety

#Surfing - Wexford now has its first ever dedicated surf school - thanks to two enterprising brothers.

The Wexford People reports on The Surf Shack in Curracloe, established by Chad and Jack-Tim Murray in an effort to put the Sunny South East on the Irish surfing map.

"Everybody knows that there are good waves on the West Coast," says Jack-Tim, referring to popular surf spots like Lahinch, Mullaghmore and Bundoran, "but most people don't even know that surfing exists on Ireland's east coast, let alone in Wexford."

The brothers aim to entice beginners to the sport, highlighting the smaller surf and safe swimming at Curracloe beach as the perfect environment for novices to ride the waves.

The Wexford People has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#RNLI - Courtmacsherry RNLI assisted two people after their yacht got into difficulty at the weekend.

The volunteer lifeboat crew was called out at 5.15pm on Saturday (13 July) to go to the aid of a yacht off Courtmacsherry Harbour in West Cork. 

The all-weather lifeboat with a crew of six was underway within minutes and proceeded to the area where the casualty had developed mechanical failure. The lifeboat arrived on the scene in 10 minutes and proceeded to take the yacht with two people on board in tow. 

Both the lifeboat and the stricken vessel were subsequently berthed at the pier in Courtmacsherry village.

This has been a busy week so far for Courtmacsherry RNLI with today's call-out being the fourth in five days.

The others were on Tuesday 9 July to an overdue jet ski in Clonakilty Bay, Thursday 11 July to the aid a windsurfer off Garrettstown, and Friday 12 July to a reported dingy off the Old Head of Kinsale which turned out to be a dead and upturned whale in the sea.

Elsewhere, Saturday was a busy evening for the Courtown lifeboat in Co Wexford.

  1. lifeboat was launched to a report of two vessels aground in a cove south of Courtown Harbour, quickly locating the vessels – a 15ft speedboat and a personal water craft (PWC) – just south of the harbour in the area known as Salt Rock.

There were two people with the vessels and the speedboat was grounded but swamped.

The lifeboat took both casualties, who were very cold, back to the harbour and then returned first to recover, bail out and tow the speedboat back, and then out to tow the PWC back into the harbour.


The lifeboat then returned to station and refuelled, ready for the Sea Sunday celebrations the following day.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#laser – Ryan Glynn in the Radials with straight firsts was the stand-out performance at last weekend's Laser Leinster Championships in Wexford Harbour Boat Club.

Conditions were 5-15 knots and shifty on Saturday then blowing stink Sunday, all in a fantastic warm, but unstable westerly breeze that reduced racing on Sunday to just one race.

Chris Penney and Mattie O'Dowd had a titanic struggle at the top of the Standard fleet and in the 4.7s, Conor O'Beirne of the Royal St. George YC came through in the last race with a nice confidence boost before he heads off this week to Hungary for the 4.7 European championships.

Results below from Wexford Harbour Boat Club

Laser Leinster Championship Std 2013

Entries: 17      Races Sailed: 4      Discard: 1

Series Place Sail No Type of Boat Class Helm Club Series Points Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4
1 201566 S   Chris Penney East Antrim BC 5 3 1 1 3
2 181999 S   Mathew o'Dowd Royal St. George YC 5 1 2 2 2
3 185104 S   Conor Simms Royal Ulster YC 10 2 3 8 5
4 198554 S   Conor Byrne Royal St. George YC 11 6 4 3 4
5 193562 S   Oisin McClelland Ballyholme YC 19 10 8 11 1
6 197364 S   Sean Murphy Kinsale YC 19 8 7 4 10
7 178335 S M Sean Craig Royal St. George YC 20 4 5 12 11
8 201365 S M Stephen Penney East Antrim BC 20 9 12 5 6
9 155068 S M Ross o'Leary Royal St. George YC 21 5 6 10 14
10 191670 S M Colin Galavan Royal Irish YC 24 12 11 6 7
11 185043 S   Peter Cameron East Antrim BC 25 11 10 7 8
12 198560 S   Henry McLaughlin Carlingford Lough YC 25 7 9 9 9
13 181674 S M Troy Hopkins Howth YC 39 13 13 15 13
14 173164 S M Timmy Washington Wexford Harb. B&TC 40 15 14 14 12
15 178689 S M Tommy Fallon Wexford Harb. B&TC 43 14 16 13 18
16 180237 S M Paul Ebrill Wexford Harb. B&TC 47 16 15 16 18
17 137120 S   Don Ryan Wexford Harb. B&TC 54 18 18 18 18

Laser Leinster Championship Radial 2013

Entries: 32      Races Sailed: 4      Discard: 1

Series Place Sail No Type of Boat Class Helm Club Tally Series Points Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4
1 198552 R Y Ryan Glynn Ballyholme YC 64 3 1 1 1 1
2 190758 R Y Dougie Power Waterford Harb. SC 19 13 2 2 13 9
3 183948 R Y Ross O'Sullivan Kinsale YC 76 13 14 7 4 2
4 203715 R Y Tim Brow Ballyholme YC 72 13 6 4 7 3
5 181428 R Y Ronan Jones Wexford Harb. B&TC 74 17 9 6 2 33
6 200637 R Y Ruairi Finnegan Waterford Harb. SC 85 17 8 3 33 6
7 191247 R Y Andrew Penney East Antrim BC 45 19 5 5 9 14
8 198780 R Y Tadhg o'Loingsigh Tralee Bay SC 87 21 10 8 3 33
9 201603 R Y Conor o'Farrell Carlingford Lough YC 63 21 12 9 8 4
10 190755 R   John Flynn Dungarvan Harb. SC 12 27 3 12 12 12
11 199054 R Y Gary Fekkes East Antrim BC 93 27 7 14 10 10
12 187591 R Y Kevin Harrington Courtown SC 99 28 18 17 6 5
13 197362 R YL Erica Ruigrok Rush SC 75 29 4 10 15 18
14 198556 R Y Mark Bolger Royal St. George YC 53 31 11 15 5 15
15 190759 R Y Conor Murphy Kinsale YC 6 31 15 13 11 7
16 196533 R Y Sam Wilkinson Ballyholme YC 91 32 13 11 17 8
17 175356 R Y Patrick Cahill Royal St. George YC 55 43 16 22 16 11
18 190774 R YL Aoife Hopkins Howth YC 54 46 21 19 14 13
19 192602 R YL Suzanne Flannigan Ballyholme YC 78 52 33 18 18 16
20 192333 R Y Daire Cournane Kinsale YC 8 55 25 16 20 19
21 201828 R Y Luke Murphy Royal St. George YC 2 59 17 23 19 33
22 178328 R Y Thomas McGrath Royal Cork YC 100 62 19 21 22 33
23 200745 R Y Scott O'Sulivan Kinsale YC 52 65 24 20 33 21
24 191319 R YL Sorcha Donnelly Ballyholme YC 47 65 22 24 23 20
25 201678 R L Jessica Rutherford Hollywood YC 90 67 20 26 21 33
26 197894 R Y Nathaniel Gillett Royal St. George YC 98 69 33 28 24 17
27 198526 R Y Charlie Edgar Donaghadee SC 79 73 23 25 25 33
28 143122 R Y Dermot Wildes Courtown SC 69 86 26 27 33 33
29 186795 R Y Gregory Fay Dungarvan Harb. SC 43 86 28 31 27 33
30 167852 R Y Conor Clery Greystones SC 71 86 27 30 29 33
31 196018 R Y Colm Moloney Courtown SC 66 87 29 32 26 33
32 96255 R Y Aaron Jones Greystones SC 73 87 30 29 28 33

 

Laser Leinster Championship 4.7 2013

Entries: 16      Races Sailed: 4      Discard: 1

Series Place Sail No Type of Boat Class Helm Club Tally Series Points Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4
1 183231 4 Y Conor O'Beirne Royal St George YC 4 5 3 1 4 1
2 198435 4 YL Cliodhna o'Regan Kinsale YC 86 6 2 2 2 4
3 180938 4 Y Richard Thompson Royal Cork YC 70 7 10 4 1 2
4 179328 4 Y J.D. Elmes Royal Cork YC 14 12 4 5 3 7
5 203716 4 Y Ciaran Finnegan Waterford Harb. SC 88 14 1 10 12 3
6 201557 4 YL Jocelyn Hill County Antrim YC 84 17 6 3 9 8
7 190754 4 Y Conor Sherriff Courtown SC 94 17 5 7 5 17
8 19736 4 Y Richard Hogan Howth YC 38 19 7 9 6 6
9 189372 4 Y Billy Duane Royal Cork YC 59 22 9 6 7 10
10 172360 4 YL Eva Donworth Royal Cork YC 77 27 11 11 11 5
11 172172 4 L Rebekah Rutherford Hollywood YC 92 31 13 8 10 17
12 198783 4 YL Caoimhe Cotter Wexford Harb. B&TC 57 31 14 12 8 11
13 163142 4 Y Luke McGrath Royal Cork YC 61 34 8 13 13 17
14 188461 4 YL Blathnaid o'Connell Royal St George YC 62 38 12 14 14 12
15 177879 4 Y Robert Wynne Dungarvan Harb. SC 83 43 17 17 17 9
16 190672 4 YL Kate MacAdorey Carlingford Lough YC 89 45 15 15 15 17
Published in Laser
Tagged under

#RNLI - The volunteer lifeboat crew at Kilmore Quay RNLI in Co Wexford had a busy time last week with five call-outs in seven days.

In the first incident on Monday 13 May, a French 6.5m yacht with two people on board got into difficulty as it was taking part in a 'mini Fastnet' yacht race.

The vessel’s crew decided to make for Kilmore Quay due to adverse weather. The yacht had no engine due to race rules and so the lifeboat was reqested to help the crew safely get into the harbour.

The second call-out came last Wednesday evening (15 May) when a member of the public reported to Dublin Coast Guard that a yacht was close in shore and flashing a light.

As the lifeboat crew were letting go the ropes, the coastguard made contact with the vessel, which was at anchor and did not require any assistance.

On Friday afternoon 17 May, the volunteer crew was alerted when an 8m pleasure craft with two people on board had fouled its propeller a quarter mile off the South Head of the Great Saltee Island.

The vessel was freed by the lifeboat crew using a grapnel hook and cutting the rope before towing the boat back to Kilmore Quay Marina.

And last Sunday 19 May saw two shouts which were similar in nature.

The first in the morning involved a small leisure craft with four people on board which suffered engine failure. The crew was relying on a mobile phone for their communications and combined with poor English, it made the task of finding them more challenging.

The crew members were eventually located to the west of the Saltees and were brought back ashore safe and well.

Later the same day, another small leisure craft - this time with three people aboard and again relying on a mobile phone for their communications - had lost power while fishing at the south side of the Little Saltee Island.

The lifeboat was on scene a short time later and towed the vessel back to Kilmore Quay.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#MaritimeFestivals - Stormy Stan sailed into Arklow aboard tall ship Ruth recently as part of the build up to Arklow RNLI’s Gathering of the Fleet Maritime Festival.

This August Bank Holiday weekend, Arklow RNLI and Arklow Harbour will play host to vessels of all shapes and sizes from tall ships such as Ruth to Naval Service vessels, vintage and prototype RNLI lifeboats, emergency service vessels and visiting boats from all around the UK, Ireland and further afield for the fundraising festival, which is now over 50 years old and continues to go from strength to strength.

Boat trips, kayaking and windsurfing opportunities will be up for grabs, as well as the special attraction of the Thundercat Experience, where visitors can head out on the water aboard a Thundercat racing boat.

There will be aerial attractions too, with a flying visit by the Garda Air Support Unit and the regular Air Sea Rescue Display with the Irish Coast Guard's Rescue 117 helicopter.

And that's not to mention the activities or landlubbers such as the carnival, food and craft stalls, live music, model boats, emergency service demonstrations and vintage vehicles.

Arklow RNLI volunteer lifeboat press officer Mark Corcoran said: "This weekend really is a must for maritime enthusiasts and all the family. Almost all of the events are free. This is our opportunity to put something back in our town.

"Without our communities continued support we couldn’t continue, so make sure to come down to Arklow this August Bank Holiday weekend for the Gathering of the Fleet-Arklow Maritime Festival."

He added: "There really is something for everybody, so put it in the calendar."

Full details of the festival will be available on the festival's Facebook page, where anyone with a vessel who wants to take part in the festival can make contact. There is also an opportunity for any novice or experienced sailors to arrive at the festival aboard a tall ship – e-mail [email protected] for further details.

Published in Maritime Festivals
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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