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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
Dublin Array Developer Applies for Foreshore Lease
A foreshore lease application has been lodged for a series of offshore windfarms in Dublin Bay. The Dublin Array, to be situated on the Bray and Kish Banks some 10km from the coast, would consist of 145 turbines, each 160m…
Dun Laoghaire Sailing Clubs Say Future is in Leisure
Dun Laoghaire's future lies in tourism and leisure, according to a submission on the new 'master plan' for the busy harbour. http://www.afloat.ie/port-news/dun-laoghaire-news/ The Irish Times reports that the town's top sailing and yacht clubs, who have come together under the…
Lord Mayor to Preside over Old Gaffers' Parade of Sail
Dublin's Lord Mayor Gerry Breen will assume the traditional title of Admiral of the Port of Dublin when he presides over the Parade of Sail on the Liffey later this month. The parade on Sunday 29 May is a highlight…
Just One Week To Go Till Red Bull Flugtag
The Red Bull Flugtag celebrates its 100th event in Dun Laoghaire next Sunday, and organisers have posted details for spectators planning to spend the day cheering on those magnificent flying machines! http://www.afloat.ie/port-news/dun-laoghaire-news/item/15214-dublin-to-host-100th-red-bull-flugtag/ http://www.afloat.ie/port-news/dun-laoghaire-news/ The site for the free event will…
500 Boats will Kick Start the Dublin Sailing Season this Weekend
Typically the start of the Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) is a traditional season highlight on the capital's waters but there's so much sailing slated for Dublin Bay the weekend it's hard to know where to start. There could be…
Ambitious Project Floated for Dun Laoghaire Harbour
Top British architects have won the commission to develop an ambitious master plan for Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The Dun Laoghaire Gazette reports that Metropolitan Workshop have been tasked examining the feasibility of redeveloping the port to attract cruise liners carrying…
Dublin To Host 100th Red Bull Flugtag
The Red Bull Flugtag will celebrate its 100th event when it comes back to Dublin this summer. Twenty years on from the first flugtag in Austria, this year's contest promises an "Irish twist" on the formula, whereby homemade flying machines…
Howth Ban on Seal Feeding 'Threat to Tourism'
Feeding harbour seals could land Howth visitors with a fine for thousands of euro, according to a recent letter in The Irish Times. Milo Kane writes of a new notice placed near the west pier by harbour officials which "threatens…
Aware's Harbour 2 Harbour Walk Around Dublin Bay
With Spring in the air...get into your stride and help raise funds for Aware's annual St. Patrick's Day Harbour 2 Harbour Walk around Dublin Bay. Aware, a charitable organisation that assists in 'helping to defeat depression, ' is to run…
Green Party Speaks Out for Small Boat Owners in Dun Laoghaire
Ciaran Cuffe TD of the Green Party has spoken out in support of small boat owners in a submission to the Dún Laoghaire Harbour Masterplan. Cuffe, a candidate in the General Election, says the prioritisation of space within the harbour…
Dun Laoghaire Plans to Welcome 'Next Generation' Liners
A new masterplan to make Dun Laoghaire a port of call for the cruise liners of the future is on the cards, according to The Irish Times. http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/0205/1224289077155.html Gerry Dunne, chief executive of the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, said Ireland's…
Dublin Cycle Route Extension Put On Hold
The planned connection of Dublin's main coastal and canal cycling routes has been put on hold following "intensive lobbying", the Dublin Observer reports. Planning permission had already been granted by Dublin Ciy Council for the completion of the €10m project…
Dublin Bay Oil, Gas, Coal...and Waste-Water!
A second drill-rig platform, the Pauline was positioned in Dublin Bay on Friday, to investigate suitable conditions for an outfall discharge pipe from the Ringsend wastewater treatment plant, writes Jehan Ashmore. The work is part of a Dublin City Council project…
Dun Laoghaire Harbour Invites Public's Views on Masterplan
The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company has invited the public to submit their ideas about the future of the harbour. A masterplan is to be developed so to address the changing emphasis of the harbour from a commercial harbour to a…
Stealth Frigates to Visit Dublin Port
Two Dutch naval frigates, HNLMS Tromp and HNLMS Van Amstel are due to arrive into Dublin Port tomorrow for a courtesy visit over the weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore. The Royal Netherlands Navy HNLMS Van Tromp is a De Zeven Provinciën-class…
The Royal Navy's Type 22 frigate HMS Chatham (F87) which recently returned to UK waters after a seven month deployment on anti-piracy duties off Somalia, visited Dublin Port last weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore. HMS Chatham was the lead vessel for…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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