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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
s it departs Dublin Port for Holyhead
A Dublin Bay sea mist that lay in the middle of the bay most of the morning had enveloped most of the south shore by lunchtime, reducing visibility down to 50 metres or less at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The morning…
File image of Poolbeg Lighthouse at the end of the Great South Wall
Dublin Port Company has announced a temporary closure of pedestrian access to the Great South Wall Due to forecasted high winds and tides in Dublin Bay from tonight, Monday 22 February. Access will be closed from tonight at 10pm until…
The newly-built emigrant ship Tayleur, bound from Liverpool to Australia in 1854, got no further than a tragic wrecking on Lambay
Dublin Bay Old Gaffers’ Association invites all to join their next Zoom session on Shipwrecks Around Dublin Bay, which will be given by Cormac Lowth on Thursday 25th February at 20.00hrs. Following on from his extremely popular talk on the…
Dublin Bay ship-scene included Endracht a Dutch flagged heavy-lift general cargoship berthed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour today, loaded a small part project-cargo which is bound for the US. The smart and unusual design at the bridge of the 105m vessel can be seen in this amidships angle alongside Carlisle Pier.
Dublin Bay saw some ships of interest today, firstly the heavy-lift general cargoship Eendracht that arrived in Dun Laoghaire Harbour today to load a part project-cargo bound for the US, writes Jehan Ashmore. The Eendracht berthed this morning after taking…
Storm Darcy's Siberian blast led to disruption of ships forcing some to depart Dublin Bay and one to head over to north Wales. The Dublin Bay Buoy is approximately in the centre of the bay and asides as an aid to navigation for mariners and shipping, also provides frequent weather updates (by twitter). In addition, Dublin Port operates a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) for the safe and efficient transit of shipping within the port limits while the Buoy acts as a 'roundabout' for vessels operating in and out of country's busiest port.
After Storm Darcy's Siberian easterly gale-force winds and seas battered Dublin Bay, the weather particularly yesterday saw several ships leave anchorage, arrive elsewhere or ride out at sea, writes Jehan Ashmore The bad weather yesterday according to the Dublin Bay Buoy…
Stormy conditions are expected to last mot of this week at the Forty Foot bathing place on Dublin Bay
The Irish Coast Guard rescued two swimmers after they ran into difficulty while swimming at the Forty Foot bathing place on Dublin Bay yesterday. The incident occurred earlier today as the swimmers required help in the choppy sea. The Dun…
Dublin Bay sailor Jimmy Fitzpatrick
One of Dublin Bay's great sailing characters Jimmy Fitzpatrick of the Royal Irish Yacht Club has sadly passed away. A true corinthian of sailing Jimmy Fitz was very well known both here and abroad. While he sailed out of the…
The Fugro Mercator is one of four survey vessels that will work on the Dublin Array project for the next three months
Mariners have been given notice of a series of geophysical surveys for the Dublin Array Wind Farm taking place between next week and early May. The Dublin Array is a project on the Kish and Bray banks some 10 km…
A SUP at the Shelley Banks on Dublin Bay
Saturday's strong northeasterly winds that kicked up such a storm in the south of Dublin Bay (as our photos of the Dun Laoghaire baths site showed) also presented some ideal surf conditions for Stand Up Paddleboarders (SUPs) in the north-west of…
Big seas at Dun Laoghaire on Saturday, January 30th. Scroll down for more
Getting into situations over his head rarely fazed Sir Roger Casement, so a new Dublin Bay seafront home should present no difficulties for the statue of the Sandycove man at the refurbished Dun Laoghaire Baths site. Saturday's north-easterly gale flooded the…
Diver Rory Golden will be returning to visit the  wreck of the Titanic this summer
Dublin Bay diver Rory Golden will join the 2021 Titanic Survey Expedition starting in May going back to the wreck after a gap of 16 years, and taking part in a “sea bed” breaking scientific expedition. Golden has over 44…
The Dublin Bay 21 Naneen on her first sail after restoration, slipping effortlessly along on the Shannon Estuary off Kilrush
The continuing restoration of the Dublin Bay 21 class of 1902, in the longterm project guided by Hal Sisk and Fionan de Barra of Dun Laoghaire, has seen the work of Master Shipwright Stephen Morris of Kilrush and his team…
Christmas Eve, 1895, and the Dublin Bay lifeboat has capsized with tragic loss of life whole trying to reach the wrecked sailing ship Palme.
If you think that life is tough under the current pandemic, then the Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association has just the thing to put current national and personal problems into perspective, with a comprehensively illustrated Zoom talk by noted maritime…
Dublin Port has issued its 2021 Notice to Mariners
Dublin Port Company has issued its 2021 Notices to Mariners.  The well-presented page on the Dublin Port website here provides links to over 40 different notices covering all aspects of Dublin Port activity in 2021 at Ireland's busiest port in a bay…
A new ISORA Coastal Series planned for January from Dun Laoghaire Harbour is to to be rescheduled
Two of 2021's early-season cruiser-racer sailing fixtures on Dublin Bay are up in the air due to January's lockdown restrictions.  A new ISORA 'Early Season Series' originally planned for this month was to continue the offshore's body's successful 2020 coastal…
New year sail - A solitary sailing cruiser enjoys a New Year's Day sail on Dublin Bay with Howth's Baily lighthouse in the background
Boaters in the capital's waters celebrated a bright but cold New Year's Day with several sailing cruisers taking a tack on Dublin Bay yesterday, empty except for three or four Dublin Port bound cargo ships moored in the southern bay…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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