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Displaying items by tag: dalkey

The Dalkey Tidy Towns team is now ready for the official unveiling of the restored World War II-era ÉIRE sign at Hawk Cliff below the Vico Road.

This past summer the rediscovered information panel — one of 80 installed around the coastline during what was known as the ‘Emergency’ in neutral Ireland — was returned to its original condition, as reported on RTÉ News.

The work over half a year involved 1,700 hours of excavation, the lifting, cleaning and restoration of 100 tonnes of stones, the application of four tonnes of dry mortar as well as 170 litres of lighthouse paint.

The ÉIRE panel was rediscovered soon after the remnants of a sign on nearby Bray Head were spotted among a host of archaeological finds across the country revealed from the air after the drought of summer 2018.

Dalkey Tidy Towns will officially unveil the Hawk Cliff sign next Tuesday 24 September at 3pm in what it promises to be a “special occasion” with an Air Corps flyover, weather permitting.

Published in Dublin Bay
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The Irish Times writes of a controversial development proposal for a scenic south Dublin fishing harbour has been given the go ahead by An Bord Pleanála.

Bartra Property, after a protracted planning struggle, has received permission to build a number of housing units at Bulloch Harbour in Dalkey.

It will consist of three three-storey houses, two apartments and a cafe as well as a number of other buildings.

Residents living at and near the picturesque coastal inlet, popular with tourists and for fishing, have long battled the proposals they believe are out of kilter with the surrounding area. Concerns have also been repeatedly aired as to the potential for flooding due to often high sea levels.

Local People Before Profit TD Richard Boyd Barrett said the decision was “incomprehensible”.

“Bulloch Harbour is a unique public amenity used by people of all ages. It is an important part of the heritage of south County Dublin, ” he said.

For more on this coastal development click here. 

Published in Dublin Bay

#lectures - As part of the Bullock Harbour Bicentenary celebrations, the next lecture is to be held on Tuesday (12 March) in the Dalkey Castle and Heritage Centre.

The free lecture programme which began last year has been organised by the Bullock Harbour Preservation Association (BHPA) in conjunction with the Dublin Port Company. So far the lecture themes have concentrated on the history and heritage of Bullock, an attractive small stone cut harbour located near Dalkey town.  

As for the next lecture this will take focus onto the horizon!...  as the talk's title is "The Port across the Bay - evolution from the early 19th century to 2040". The lecture is to be presented by Eamonn O'Reilly, Chief Executive Officer of the Dublin Port Company.

All are welcome to the lecture which will take place at 8pm in the Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre.

Please be advised that there is now no need to book places as admission is free and the venue is large enough to accommodate all-comers.

 

 

 

Published in Dublin Bay

Last season Dublin Bay sailors hit rocks off Dalkey Island prompting Dublin Bay Sailing Club, the largest leisure users of the bay, to issue a warning over the hazard. Known locally as 'Leac Buidhe', the rocks in Muglins Sound gave some sailors a bump at low water. As a result, sailors were warned to stay away from rocks at the North end of Dalkey Island. This week Afloat.ie has been sent a number of photos depicting a new 'rock' in a nearby location.

The mysterious appearance is nearly as amazing as last month's story on Afloat about the cruising boat that witnessed a volcano emerging in the Pacific. Except this time, Afloat has been reliably informed, the new 'rock' won't cause much of a bump because it is made of fibreglass and linked to a film crew based at nearby Coliemore Harbour! Realistic isn't it?

Published in Dublin Bay
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#dalkeyisland – Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore says Dalkey Island harbour slipway works on Dublin Bay (as previously reported by Afloat.ie) are expected to be completed by the end of May. In his latest newsletter to Dun Laoghaire constituents, the local TD says the €63,500 worth of minor safety improvements to the harbour 'will once again make this valuable local amenity accessible to local residents and tourists'.  

The ferry service from Coliemore harbour to Dalkey Island was suspended three years ago as concerns were raised in relation to the embarking and disembarking of passengers at Coliemore and the slipway on the island.

The country's biggest boating centre with an estimated 1,000 pleasure craft is located nearby at Dun Laoghaire harbour making Dalkey island and Dalkey Sound, at the southern edge of Dublin Bay, a favourite summer time spot for boat owners to anchor and explore.

Gilmore's colleague Jan O'Sullivan, Minister for State at the Department of the Environment, signed the foreshore license to allow for the restoration of the island slip.

The works include raising the existing slipway to create a stepped top surface, widening of the existing channel, a new raised pier section with transitional steps, a handrail, mooring rings and an access ladder. More here.

Published in Island News
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#DalkeyIslandWorks - Work to upgrade the landing stage pier on Dalkey Island on south Dublin Bay have begun this Spring with completion due in May, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council are confident that following the upgraded harbour, a licensed passenger-only ferryboat service from Coliemore Harbour which is also to undergo some remedial work, will start this season after an absence of three years.

A foreshore license to permit the work on Dalkey Island, part of a recommendation of the island's management Conservation Plan, was signed in February by the Minister of State for Housing and Planning.

Work on the island harbour under the PART 8 scheme started as a priority before breeding season of rare bird species begins around May, as the small scenic island located only nine miles from Dublin City, is afforded EU designated status as a Special Protection Area (SPA).

This particular PART 8 programme only covers island issues among them plans to restore the Martello Tower and Gun Battery, though it is understood not St. Begnet's Church which is the responsibility of the OPW.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, plans to the upgrade the island harbour which according to consultant report in 2012 estimated to be in the region of €228,000, has already seen the old pier-slipway demolished and the foundation in place for a new landing point pier and slipway structure laid down, facilitating easier access for all boat users.

In addition the work has to date involved widening and deepening the once narrower entrance to the island and a yet to be installed new feature of a navigational light marking the approaches of the new public amenity. The island harbour will be capable of berthing several small boats at the same time and not restricted as much to the previous extent of tidal variations.

It is understood that the construction process did not require helicopter-equipment lifts as previously reported, unlike the last major upgrade in 1994 when a helicopter performed frequent flights.

On this occasion the harbour works involve the Cork registered Kismet, a self-propelled pontoon loaded heavy plant machinery to the island and where work has taken a steady pace, notably due to favourable weather conditions.

Over the last two years, the Coliemore Harbour Users Action Group representing a diverse range of local groups throughout Dalkey led a campaign with support of local councillors to ensure that the core issue of a commercial licensed ferryboat service be reinstated from Coliemore Harbour.

There were concerns that an alternative new service instead operating from Dun Laoghaire Harbour taking around 20-25 minutes would replace Coliemore Harbour, as DLRCoCo had cited concerns over boat safety access, public liabilty insurance and harbour repair costs, following a consultants structural report into the fabric of the harbour completed in 1868.

However, despite such concerns, funding of around €63,000 for short-term works have been made available so to address safety access issues at Coliemore Harbour, the traditional mainland embarkation to Dalkey Island. Such works will permit the restoration of the licensed boat service in readiness for this summer.

A boat has been inspected by the Marine Survey Office at the Department of Transport, which will enable up to six passengers to be ferried on the convenient short five-minute hop across Dalkey Sound.

Further works at Coliemore Harbour, over the medium and long term will also be carried out to consolidate the future of one of Dublin Bay's most attractive small stone-cut harbours.

The harbour is not only a popular place for locals and visitors alike but is as a location widely featured for film shoots, documentaries and TV commercials.

Published in Island News
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#Dalkey's Coliemore Harbour on the Dublin coast succumbed for a time to today's North easterly gales with large waves breaking over the ancient harbour walls at high water (and big waves in Dalkey Sound too) as the above video from Ronan Beirne at Lenister Boats shows.

Published in Dublin Bay
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#Ex007inDalkey- Pierce Brosnan, the Irish born actor and former 007 James Bond, caused quite a stir on the first day of March in Dalkey. The actor was on a location shoot and was understood to be making a TV advert campaign with scenes from the south-side suburb and at Coliemore Harbour, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Dalkey which is well known for its famous string of celebrities, had greeted the Navan born actor's presence with a distinct buzz in the Spring air, as the cameras rolled at the scenic coastal location facing out to Dalkey Island.

For the shoot Brosnan stood at the public viewing area above the harbour, where there is a binocular-scope which is dedicated in the memory of the life and work of the late Dr. John de Courcy Ireland.The former Dalkey resident, was a maritime historian, teacher and linguist and who is widely regarded as the 'father' of Maritime Ireland.

Brosnan played Bond between 1995-2004 during which four films were produced. It was in his second outing as Bond in 'Tomorrow Never Dies' that a Royal Navy frigate, fictitiously named HMS Devonshire made a brief appearance. The frigate was sunk in the South China Sea by a stealth ship, instigated by the evil media mogul magnate Elliot Carver, head of the Carver Media Group Network (CMGN).

By an uncanny coincidence, only a couple of hours before the shoot at Coliemore Harbour took place, HMS Richmond (F239) a sister of the frigate that played the role in the film (in real life HMS Somerset), had sailed past The Muglins lighthouse off Dalkey Island. As previously reported, HMS Richmond, a Duke class frigate was bound for Dublin Port for a courtesy call over the weekend.

brosnan

007 signs autographs for Dalkey fans. Photo: Gail Bonass

HMSRichmond

HMS Richmond passes the Muglins on Dublin Bay. Photo: Jehan Ashmore

Brosnan's visit to Dalkey was certainly a surprise for locals and tourists alike and will no doubt assist in boosting visitor numbers. By another coincidence on the same day, the town's Heritage Centre on Castle Street, the main street of the former port town for Dublin during medieval times, reopened after completion of a major upgrade of the visitor centre.

Unlike the former Bond's notable presence, HMS Richmond slipped quietly out of Dublin Bay today. Having said that, could there be a connection!....According to yesterday's Irish Times –The Social Network column, among his next film projects is 'November Man', an espionage movie. He quoted "...the stage is big enough for Daniel and myself".

Published in News Update

#DALKEY ISLAND PROSPECT – Environment Minister Phil Hogan has rejected a call by Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore and others for a public inquiry into Providence Resources foreshore licence application to survey and drill for oil and gas in Dublin Bay, the Irish Times reports.

Mr Hogan has said that as the application by Providence Resources for survey and drilling work 6kms off Dalkey Island was the subject of public consultation, he did not consider a public inquiry "necessary".

Tánaiste and Labour Dún Laoghaire TD Eamon Gilmore said earlier yesterday that Mr Hogan should exercise his right to hold an oral hearing under the foreshore legislation. Last month, the Green Party and a number of residents in the Dalkey area also called for an inquiry.

Speaking in Galway yesterday, Mr Gilmore acknowledged that a "couple of wells" had been drilled in Dublin Bay previously, but there were a "lot of issues" relating to the current application.

To read more about this story click HERE

Published in News Update

#'DALKEY ISLAND' PROSPECT – In response to a proposed exploratory search for oil and gas operation by Providence Resources off Dalkey Island, Co. Dublin, as previously reported on Afloat.ie, a public meeting is to be held by Dalkey Community Council next week, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The meeting to be held next Tuesday in Dalkey Town Hall (at 7.30 p.m.) is to discuss the Providence venture, named 'Dalkey Island' prospect, in reference to the island off the south-side suburb. The island and the coast along Dalkey is geographically the nearest landfall to where the proposed 'jack-up' drill rig would operate in block (33/21) in the Kish Bank Basin.

An online petition (see www.protectourcoast.net)  by campaigners, entitled 'Protect Dublin Bay, Dalkey Island and Killiney Bay from Large Oil Drill 2012', has already gained large support, including signatures from overseas. They are in protest over Providence Resources application for a foreshore license which has been lodged with the Department of Environment.

Providence Resources propose to drill a single borehole for the exploratory well which is likely to be in an area only 6kms offshore of the Dalkey coastline. The island is designated a Special Protection Area (SPA) and notably where there have been sightings of bottlenose dolphins in neighbouring Killiney Bay.

Should the oil be commercially viable, the benefits of becoming self-sufficient and security of supply would be of significant economic benefit to Ireland. To date 100% of the country's oil and 95% of its gas is currently imported, and yet most of Ireland's natural resources are unexplored, according to Providence Resources.

Exploration is an expensive exercise and has no guarantee of discovery while the timeframe from discovery to production can typically take five to seven years.

"Yet," say Providence Resources, "the implications of discovering and utilising such a natural resource, and potentially becoming self-sufficient in energy terms, would be of significant economic benefit for Ireland Inc. in terms of taxation, employment, security of supply and skills development."

To read more information about Dalkey Island Prospect from Providence Resources, with maps, montages (including views from White Rock Beach) newsletters and video presentation visit www.providenceresources.com/dalkeyisland.aspx

Published in Coastal Notes
Page 1 of 2

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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