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Fuel Costs Increased and Sterling Uncertainty Impact ICG Results

8th March 2018
Intended for service on the Dublin – Holyhead route in 2020, this second new vessel (after W.B. Yeats) will be the largest cruise ferry in the world in terms of vehicle capacity with accommodation for 1,800 passengers and crew. Vehicle decks (5,610 freight lane metres), capable of carrying 330 freight units per sailing – a 50% increase in peak freight capacity compared to current flagship Ulysses (see link below to Irish Times photo). Intended for service on the Dublin – Holyhead route in 2020, this second new vessel (after W.B. Yeats) will be the largest cruise ferry in the world in terms of vehicle capacity with accommodation for 1,800 passengers and crew. Vehicle decks (5,610 freight lane metres), capable of carrying 330 freight units per sailing – a 50% increase in peak freight capacity compared to current flagship Ulysses (see link below to Irish Times photo). Photo: ICG

#FerryNews - Fuel costs increased and a weaker sterling led earnings at Irish Ferries owner Irish Continental Group (ICG) to fall 3 per cent, results for the year ended December 31st 2017 show.

As The Irish Times reports, despite revenue growth of 3 per cent to €335.1 million on the back of volume growth across the group’s operations, earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation fell to €81 million.

Company chairman John B McGuckian flagged the year as a successful one before noting group fuel costs increased by 25.2 per cent to €40.3 million.

Early in the financial year Irish Continental sold its MV Kaitaki which yielded a profit after tax of €24.9 million. Early this year the company sold its Jonathan Swift vessel.

Additionally, the company entered into an agreement this year for a new ferry, which will cost €165.2 million, that will be delivered to the group in 2020 and will be used on the company’s Dublin to Holyhead services.

Although the company’s EBITDA performance won’t thrill shareholders, it was ahead of analyst expectations while profit before tax increased by 45 per cent to €87.8 million. Additionally, the company has moved from a €37.9 million net debt position in 2016 to a net cash position of €39.6 million last year.

Irish continental operates in two divisions; the ferries division which offers passenger and roll-on roll-off freight services, and the container and terminal division.

Despite Brexit associated headwinds, the overall car market to and from the Republic of Ireland grew by around 1.7 per cent in 2017 to 807,400 cars.

Irish Ferries’ car carryings “performed strongly”, up 2.4 per cent to 424,000 cars. The company carried 1.65 million passengers in the period, up 1.7 per cent, thus outperforming growth in the wider market where numbers edged up 1 per cent to 3.13 million passengers.

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