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Displaying items by tag: Portaferry

The 200th anniversary of the RNLI was celebrated in Portaferry on Sunday (26 May) with a cross-community service of thanksgiving held in St Patrick’s Community Centre.

The service hosted by Portaferry RNLI was greatly supported by both the local community and those who had travelled from further afield, and included contributions from religious representatives from Portaferry and the surrounding areas of Northern Ireland’s Ards Peninsula.

The audience was entertained by local sea shanty group the Selkies as well as a solo by Father Martin O’Hagan who was accompanied by Zara Quinn.

Speakers and dignitaries on the stage at St Patrick’s Community Centre to celebrate 200 years of the RNLI | Credit: RNLI/Lissa McCullySpeakers and dignitaries on the stage at St Patrick’s Community Centre to celebrate 200 years of the RNLI | Credit: RNLI/Lissa McCully

Among the attendees were the Lord Lieutenant of County Down, Gawn Rowan Hamilton; Mayor Jennifer Gilmour; Jim Shannon MP; Portaferry RNLI operations president John Murray; president of Portaferry RNLI’s fundraising branch Eveleigh Brownlow MBE; and Ards Peninsula Council members.

All at Portaferry RNLI said they wish to express their sincere gratitude to everyone who contributed to or joined them to mark such a important milestone in their charity’s history.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

HM Coastguard requested the launch of Portaferry RNLI’s inshore lifeboat on Friday evening (24 May) to assist a 35ft yacht which was making slow progress after having suffered engine failure eight miles to the north-east of Strangford Bar in Northern Ireland.

As friends and family arrived at Portaferry Lifeboat Station shortly after 6pm to dedicate a bench to the memory of former crew member Billy Ellison, the lifeboat launched with helm Chris Adair and volunteer crew members Scott Blackwood, Oliver Rogers and Gary Meehan onboard.

Conditions at the time had a Force 3-4 southerly light breeze, slightly choppy wave conditions and good visibility.

Once on scene, both members of the stricken yacht’s crew and their dog were observed to be safe and well.

After an assessment of the situation, the yacht crew were happy and able to hoist their mainsail and make their own way to the safety of Ardglass Marina.

Portaferry’s lifeboat returned to station at 7.30pm and after washing and refuelling the boat, the crew enjoyed refreshments with the Ellison family and past Portaferry RNLI lifeboat crew members. Comments were made that perhaps Billy Ellison was watching on.

An hour later, the coastguard contacted Portaferry lifeboat operations manager, Heather Kennedy to report that the yacht was now 1.5 miles out of Ardglass but needed assistance to negotiate the entrance to the marina.

With no other vessel available to assist, the lifeboat crew readied themselves and launched immediately.

Once on scene, a tow was established ensuring the yacht could safely enter the marina where it was met by Newcastle Coastguard.

Kennedy said: “We commend the crew onboard the yacht for raising the alarm when their engine failed. This is always the correct thing to do and a situation can quickly change and greater risks may arise.”

The RNLI reminds all boat owners to check their vessel's engine to ensure they are ready for summer. Always check the weather and tides before venturing out. Always wear a lifejacket or suitable personal flotation device for your activity and always carry a means of calling for help. Should you get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Portaferry RNLI inshore lifeboat was launched on Monday evening to assist a 6-meter fishing vessel which had suffered engine failure close to the Bar Buoy at the entrance into Strangford Lough.

Belfast Coastguard requested the launch of the lifeboat at 6.11 pm, and the lifeboat, with helm Russel McGovern and volunteer crew members Scott Blackwood, Ros Watret, and George Toma onboard, launched at 6.15 pm and immediately made its way to the scene.

According to the volunteer crew, the weather conditions at the time were cloudy but fair, choppy, with a force 4 light breeze from the north. Once on scene, the crew observed the single member of crew to be safe and well.

An assessment of the situation showed that the vessel was unable to continue under its power, so a decision was made to establish a tow. The lifeboat towed the fishing vessel back to the safety of Cook Street Quay.

The lifeboat departed the scene at 7:25 p.m. and was back in the station at 7:30 p.m. Russell McGovern, Portaferry RNLI volunteer lifeboat helm, said, "We would commend the crew onboard the fishing vessel for having a means of calling for help and for raising the alarm when the engine failed."

"We would remind all boat owners to check their vessel's engine to ensure they are ready for summer. Always check the weather and tides before venturing out. Always wear a lifejacket or suitable personal flotation device for your activity and always carry a means of calling for help. Should you get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, call 999 and ask for the Coastguard," he added.

The incident highlights the importance of being prepared while venturing into the sea, and the tireless work of the RNLI volunteers who are always ready to assist those in need.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Portaferry RNLI came to the aid of four people on St Patrick’s Day (Sunday 17 March) after their ocean-going rowing boat sustained a broken rudder and developed steering problems.

Belfast Coastguard requested the launch of Portaferry RNLI’s inshore lifeboat at 6.01pm to assist the crew of a rowing boat who had reported steering problems north of the South Rock Buoy off the Co Down coast in Northern Ireland.

The lifeboat, Blue Peter V, helmed by Chris Adair and with volunteer crew members Paul Mageean, Patrick Lowry and Molly Crowe onboard, launched shortly after and immediately made its way to the scene. Weather conditions at the time were overcast and choppy with a west-south-westerly Force 4 breeze.

Once on scene, the volunteer crew observed that all were safe and well before assessing the situation.

Given the fact that the crew were unable to make safe progress without their rudder, a decision was made to establish a tow.

The rowing boat was towed to the nearest safe port at Portavogie Harbour and the lifeboat departed at 7.30pm, returning to the station by 8.15pm.

Speaking following the call-out, Heather Kennedy, Portaferry RNLI lifeboat operations manager said: “We would like to commend the crew of the rowing boat for raising the alarm when they got into difficulty; that is always the right thing to do. We were glad to be of assistance and wish the crew well.

“We would remind boat owners ahead of the Easter period to check their vessel and engine to ensure they are ready for the season ahead. Always check the weather before venturing out. Always wear a lifejacket or suitable personal flotation device for your activity and always carry a means of calling for help.

“Should you get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A former lifeboat crew member who joined the volunteer team at Portaferry RNLI on Strangford Lough in Northern Ireland in 1980 when she was just 17 has recently returned to her hometown, where she has now taken up the reins as Lifeboat Operations Manager, a position her father held when she first joined.

Heather Kennedy officially took up the Lifeboat Operations Manager position on 12 October but says it was far from her mind when she moved back to Portaferry last November. She succeeds outgoing Lifeboat Operations Manager Philip Johnston, who led the team for almost five years, having also served for many years as a Deputy Launching Authority and a crew member.

Heather is also involved with the Ruffian 23 sailing class that celebrated its 50th anniversary in Portaferry this summer.

‘The lifeboat was only here a year when I became a crew member at 17 in 1980,’ Heather explains. ‘My dad Billy Brown was the Honorary Secretary as it was known then, and he was the main reason I got involved. I was mad keen to join the crew and the D class lifeboat which eventually moved to the Atlantic 21 class. I trained and passed out as a helm in Cowes but also qualified as a nurse during the same period so after 12 years on the crew, I moved to England for work.’

While sailing always featured in Heather’s life, it wasn’t until she moved home to Portaferry a year ago, that she got involved with the RNLI again: ‘I thought I could quietly come back and volunteer as shore crew which I did for the first few months, but then other people had other ideas for me when the vacancy for Lifeboat Operations Manager came up.’

As for following in her father’s footsteps in becoming the Lifeboat Operations Manager, Heather says taking on the role is an honour: ‘It is a real privilege to be the Lifeboat Operations Manager for a station and I know that when I think of all the Lifeboat Operations Managers that have gone before me and the respect that I have for them. I know I have big boots to fill and that there are expectations when our safe and reliable lifeboat is requested to launch when the time arises.’

Heather has seen significant changes since her time as a crew member and has a variety of new responsibilities.

‘So much has changed since I was a crew member here in the eighties. We now have an Atlantic 85 class lifeboat, all the crew have their individual personal protective equipment (PPE) and there have been so many advancements in technology and equipment, all changes in the good and right way.

‘There has been a lot to get my head around, including everything relating to the crew’s training and the technical and digital side of things, but what I have found so far is that everybody is falling over themselves to help me. I have also had great support from people in the sailing club, the community, and my family. Everyone at the station, including our 25-strong team of lifeboat and shore crew, have been very welcoming, friendly, and supportive, and I have got great help and advice from my fellow launching authorities, including John Murray who was a crew member at the same time as me.’

Wishing her well in the role, Phillip Johnston, RNLI Area Lifesaving Manager, said: ‘Heather is helping the RNLI to save lives at sea by carrying out the day-to-day management of the lifeboat station at Portaferry. I want to thank and commend her for the work she has done in her short time in the role to date to authorise the launch of the lifeboat, to provide leadership to the operations team and to ensure that all operational activities are carried out to maintain the lifeboat and all associated equipment. It is a busy volunteer role that I hope she continues to enjoy and finds rewarding as she supports the team around her.’

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Portaferry RNLI came to the aid of two people on Saturday evening (21 October) after they got cut off by the tide at Rough Island at the northern end of Strangford Lough in Northern Ireland.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their inshore lifeboat at 5.25pm at the request of Belfast Coastguard.

Helmed by Dave Fisher and with crew members Molly Crowe, Rosslyn Watret and George Toma onboard, the lifeboat launched immediately and made its way to the scene at Rough Island, which has a causeway that covers a period of 2-3 hours before high tide.

Weather conditions at the time were good with a Force 3-4 wind and a slight sea state.

Once on scene, the crew observed that the man and woman were both safe and well before taking them onboard the lifeboat and bringing them safely back to shore.

Speaking following the call-out, Heather Kennedy, Portaferry RNLI lifeboat operations manager said: “We were delighted to be able to assist both people safely back to shore.

“We would remind anyone planning a walk to always check weather and tide time signage before venturing out as it can be easy to get caught out by the incoming tide at high water.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The volunteer crew from Portaferry RNLI were requested to launch by Belfast Coastguard shortly before 5pm on Friday (18 August) to assist a sailing yacht in difficulty.

The 28ft yacht with two adults and a child on board had run into trouble off Ardglass on the coast of Co Down in Northern Ireland.

The occupants had found it difficult to make way against the rough weather conditions as Storm Betty approached, and with their engine running low on fuel they radioed the coastguard for assistance.

Under the command of coxswain Gerry McConkey, the all-weather lifeboat The Leonard Kent from Newcastle RNLI launched at 5.40pm to assist Portaferry RNLI’s inshore lifeboat, if required.

Conditions were difficult with an easterly to south-easterly wind and rough waves between two-and-a-half and three-and-a-half metres.

Having first ensured that the three people on board were not in need of any immediate assistance themselves, the lifeboat helm assessed the situation and made the decision that taking the vessel under tow was the safety way to assist the casualties.

The yacht was taken under tow to the nearest safe and suitable port, which was Ardglass Marina, by the Portaferry lifeboat.

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Portaferry RNLI came to the aid of kayakers who got into difficulty near Kilard Point late yesterday afternoon (Monday, 7 November).

Portaferry RNLI’s volunteer crew launched their inshore Atlantic 85 class lifeboat promptly at 2.20 pm and made their way to Kilard Point in Strangford Lough. The crew launched in cloudy weather conditions with good visibility, a Force Six south-westerly wind direction and a moderate sea state.

When on scene at 2.30 pm the crew searched the Kilcief shoreline for two kayakers reported to be in one inflatable kayak. After an update from HM Coastguard, the lifeboat crew commenced a search one mile east of St. Patrick’s Rock, Strangford Lough, where they faced weather conditions of a Force 8-10. Whilst completing the search, the crew spotted the two kayakers located 50 yards off the fairway buoy.

The two men who were safe and well were taken onboard the lifeboat and the inflatable kayak was left on scene due to the adverse conditions. The lifeboat crew then took the kayakers to Strangford pontoon where they were transferred into the care of the NI Ambulance service.

Commenting on the call out, Portaferry RNLI Helm Dave Fisher said: ‘Despite the adverse weather conditions on scene, the quick actions by the lifeboat crew resulted in a favourable outcome. Thankfully the two kayakers were returned to shore with no injuries. Their ability to raise the alarm to the Coastguard via a mobile device was the right choice to make’.

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 A group of 18 volunteers from Portaferry RNLI in Northern Ireland have been rewarded and recognised for their dedication to saving lives at sea.

At a special meal held in the Co Down coastal town on Friday 9 September, two crew members received a commendation letter from the RNLI for their role in a callout two years ago.

Two volunteers received long-service awards from the charity, while 13 volunteers were presented with the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee medal.

Meanwhile, Patricia Browne was recognised for receiving a British Empire Medal (BEM) for her 42 years of service.

Volunteer crew members Fergal Glynn and Ian Sands were recognised for their dedication and service during a multi-agency search and exceptional delivery of casualty care rescue response two years ago, when they worked to recover a casualty from the water who was sadly later pronounced deceased.

Long-service awards were presented to Jeremy Rogers for 26 years and Simon Rogers for 23 years. During their service at Portaferry RNLI, they served as inshore lifeboat crew and helmsmen, and Simon also acted as lifeboat operations manager. Simon and Jeremy rescued 108 lives between them during their years of service.

As a token of thanks, 13 volunteers from Portaferry RNLI — Chris Adair, Sinead Breen, Colin Conway, Jordan Conway, Graham Edgar, Simon Exley, Tory Killen, Fiona Magee, John Murray, Terence O’Neill, Paddy Ritchie, Mark Stevenson and George Toma — were among the 4,500 volunteers and frontline staff to be awarded a special commemorative Platinum Jubilee medal in recognition of the 65,886 lives the RNLI has saved during the Queen Elizabeth’s 70-year-reign. The commemorative medal was created to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.

In June, volunteer Patricia Browne was awarded a British Empire Medal (BEM) for her 42 years of service to the RNLI. First joining the institution in 1979 at Portaferry RNLI, shortly before the town’s lifeboat station was officially established in 1980, Patricia has held the position of chair of the Portaferry Fundraising Branch for 27 years. Under her leadership, the Portaferry Fundraising Branch has raised over £221,000 for the RNLI in the last 10 years.

Speaking at the event last month, Portaferry RNLI’s current lifeboat operations manager Philip Johnston said: “As a station team, we are truly delighted and appreciative of the recognition by the charity and others, of our volunteer work in saving lives at sea.

“It has been a challenging few years for everyone with the pandemic so it is really wonderful that we can gather as a team tonight and reward those who have been recognised for their efforts. Their achievements are testament to their selflessness and dependability over the years and I wish to congratulate and thank them and the wider station team here in Portaferry who work tirelessly to deliver our essential lifesaving service.”

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Portaferry RNLI in Northern Ireland rescued a male after he drifted more than a mile out to sea while holding on to the edge of a 15ft cabin cruiser on Tuesday afternoon (23 August).

The lifeboat crew were launched to reports of a person in the water after the alarm was raised by a local woman at Kilcief Gaelic park when she heard calls for help and contacted Belfast Coastguard.

Portaferry’s volunteer crew launched the inshore lifeboat promptly at 3.40pm and made their way to Rock Angus in Strangford Lough.

When on scene at 3.45pm, the lifeboat crew faced Force 4 conditions with a choppy sea state but excellent visibility.

The lifeboat crew located the casualty in the water and clinging to the cabin cruiser at the bar bouy at the start of Strangford Lough.

They immediately set about bringing the casualty onboard the lifeboat while checking him over for any injuries. The crew then proceeded back to Strangford Harbour and transferred the casualty into the care of his family and Portaferry Coastguard rescue team.

Following this, the lifeboat headed back to station to pick up another crew member and the salvage pump in case the casualty boat was taking on water.

When on scene again with the cabin cruiser, the crew checked the area over for any debris and then recovered the boat and established a tow to Strangford Harbour.

Commenting on the callout, Portaferry lifeboat press officer Jordan Conway said: “We were glad to rescue the casualty this afternoon and bring him to safety. The member of the public did the right thing by contacting the coastguard when she heard the calls for help.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Port of Cork Information

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of only two Irish ports which service the requirements of all six shipping modes i.e., Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise. Due to its favourable location on the south coast of Ireland and its modern deep-water facilities, the Port of Cork is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services.

The Port of Cork is investing €80 million in a container terminal development in Ringaskiddy. The Cork Container Terminal will initially offer a 360-metre quay with 13-metre depth alongside and will enable larger ships to berth in the port. The development also includes the construction of a 13.5-hectare terminal and associated buildings as well as two ship to shore gantry cranes and container handling equipment.

The development of new container handling facilities at Ringaskiddy was identified in the Port of Cork’s Strategic Development Plan in 2010. It will accommodate current and future container shipping which can be serviced by modern and efficient cargo handling equipment with innovative terminal operating and vehicle booking systems. The Port of Cork anticipates that Cork Container Terminal will be operational in 2020.

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of just two Irish ports which service the requirements of all shipping modes.

The Port of Cork also controls Bantry Bay Port Company and employs 150 people across all locations.

A European Designated Core Port and a Tier 1 Port of National Significance, Port of Cork’s reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround as well as the company’s investment in future growth, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain.

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades, most recently with the construction of the new €80m Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy which will facilitate the natural progression of the move from a river port to a deepwater port in order to future proof the Port
of Cork. This state-of-the-art terminal which will open in 2020 will be capable of berthing the largest container ships currently calling to Ireland.

The Port of Cork Company is a commercial semi-state company responsible for the commercial running of the harbour as well as responsibility for navigation and berthage in the port.  The Port is the main port serving the South of Ireland, County Cork and Cork City. 

Types of Shipping Using Port of Cork

The Port offers all six shipping modes from Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise liner traffic.

Port of Cork Growth

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades. Since 2000, the Port of Cork has invested €72 million in improving Port infrastructure and facilities. Due to its favourable location and its modern deepwater facilities, the Port is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services. A well-developed road infrastructure eases the flow of traffic from and to the port. The Port of Cork’s growing reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain. The Port of Cork Company turnover in 2018 amounted to €35.4 million, an increase of €3.9 million from €31.5 million in 2017. The combined traffic of both the Ports of Cork and Bantry increased to 10.66 million tonnes in 2018 up from 10.3 million tonnes in 2017.

History of Port of Cork

Famous at the last port of call of the Titanic, these medieval navigation and port facilities of the city and harbour were historically managed by the Cork Harbour Commissioners. Founded in 1814, the Cork Harbour Commissioners moved to the Custom House in 1904.  Following the implementation of the 1996 Harbours Act, by March 1997 all assets of the Commissioners were transferred to the Port of Cork Company.

Commercial Traffic at Port of Cork

Vessels up to 90,000 tonnes deadweight (DWT) are capable of coming through entrance to Cork Harbour. As the shipping channels get shallower the farther inland one travels, access becomes constricted, and only vessels up to 60,000 DWT can sail above Cobh. The Port of Cork provides pilotage and towage facilities for vessels entering Cork Harbour. All vessels accessing the quays in Cork City must be piloted and all vessels exceeding 130 metres in length must be piloted once they pass within 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) of the harbour entrance.

Berthing Facilities in Cork Harbour

The Port of Cork has berthing facilities at Cork City, Tivoli, Cobh and Ringaskiddy. The facilities in Cork City are primarily used for grain and oil transport. Tivoli provides container handling, facilities for oil, livestock and ore and a roll on-roll off (Ro-Ro) ramp. Prior to the opening of Ringaskiddy Ferry Port, car ferries sailed from here; now, the Ro-Ro ramp is used by companies importing cars into Ireland. In addition to the ferry terminal, Ringaskiddy has a deep water port.

Port of Cork Development Plans

2020 will be a significant year for the Port of Cork as it prepares to complete and open the €86 million Cork Container Terminal development in Ringaskiddy.

Once operational the new terminal will enable the port to handle up to 450,000 TEU per annum. Port of Cork already possess significant natural depth in Cork harbour, and the work in Ringaskiddy Port will enable the Port of Cork to accommodate vessels of 5500 to 6000 TEU, which will provide a great deal of additional potential for increasing container traffic.

It follows a previous plan hatched in 2006 as the port operated at full capacity the Port drew up plans for a new container facility at Ringaskiddy. This was the subject of major objections and after an Oral Planning Hearing was held in 2008 the Irish planning board Bord Pleanala rejected the plan due to inadequate rail and road links at the location.  

Further notable sustainability projects also include:

  • The Port of Cork have invested in 2 x STS cranes – Type single lift, Model P (148) L, (WS) Super. These cranes contain the most modern and energy-efficient control and monitoring systems currently available on the market and include an LED floodlight system equipped with software to facilitate remote diagnostics, a Crane Management System (CMS) and an energy chain supply on both cranes replacing the previous preferred festoon cabling installation.
  • The Port of Cork has installed High Mast Lighting Voltage Control Units at its two main cargo handling locations – Tivoli Industrial & Dock Estate and Ringaskiddy Deep-water & Ferry Terminals. This investment has led to more efficient energy use and reduced risk of light pollution. The lights can also be controlled remotely.
  • The Port of Cork’s largest electrical consumer at Tivoli Container Terminal is the handling and storage of refrigerated containers. Local data loggers were used to assess energy consumption. This provided timely intervention regarding Power Factor Correction Bank efficiency on our STS (Ship to Shore) Cranes and Substations, allowing for reduced mains demand and reducing wattless energy losses along with excess charges. The information gathered has helped us to design and build a reefer storage facility with energy management and remote monitoring included.

Bantry Port

In 2017 Bantry Bay Port Company completed a significant investment of €8.5 million in the Bantry Inner Harbour development. The development consisted of a leisure marina, widening of the town pier, dredging of the inner harbour and creation of a foreshore amenity space.

Port of Cork Cruise Liner Traffic

2019 was a record cruise season for the Port of Cork with 100 cruise liners visiting. In total over 243,000 passengers and crew visited the region with many passengers visiting Cork for the first time.

Also in 2019, the Port of Cork's Cruise line berth in Cobh was recognised as one of the best cruise destinations in the world, winning in the Top-Rated British Isles & Western Europe Cruise Destination category. 

There has been an increase in cruise ship visits to Cork Harbour in the early 21st century, with 53 such ships visiting the port in 2011, increasing to approximately 100 cruise ship visits by 2019.

These cruise ships berth at the Port of Cork's deepwater quay in Cobh, which is Ireland's only dedicated berth for cruise ships.

Passenger Ferries

Operating since the late 1970s, Brittany Ferries runs a ferry service to Roscoff in France. This operates between April and November from the Ro-Ro facilities at Ringaskiddy. Previous ferry services ran to Swansea in Wales and Santander in Spain. The former, the Swansea Cork ferry, ran initially between 1987 and 2006 and also briefly between 2010 and 2012.

The latter, a Brittany Ferries Cork–Santander service, started in 2018 but was cancelled in early 2020.

Marine Leisure

The Port of Cork has a strategy that aims to promote the harbour also as a leisure amenity. Cork’s superb natural harbour is a great place to enjoy all types of marine leisure pursuits. With lots of sailing and rowing clubs dotted throughout the harbour, excellent fishing and picturesque harbour-side paths for walking, running or cycling, there is something for everyone to enjoy in and around Cork harbour. The Port is actively involved with the promotion of Cork Harbour's annual Festival. The oldest sailing club in the world, founded in 1720, is the Royal Cork Yacht Club is located at Crosshaven in the harbour, proof positive, says the Port, that the people of Cork, and its visitors, have been enjoying this vast natural leisure resource for centuries. 

Port of Cork Executives

  • Chairman: John Mullins
  • Chief Executive: Brendan Keating
  • Secretary/Chief Finance Officer: Donal Crowley
  • Harbour Master and Chief Operations Officer: Capt. Paul O'Regan
  • Port Engineering Manager: Henry Kingston
  • Chief Commercial Officer: Conor Mowlds
  • Head of Human Resources: Peter O'Shaughnessy