Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: rowing

Irish rowers Fiona Murtagh and Airfic Keogh are taking home the silver medals for the Women's Pair and the Men's Double of Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch are also coming home with silverware after winning bronze.

Up against reigning World Champions Veronique Meester and Ymkje Clevering of the Netherlands, the crew from Galway had a tough race ahead. Ireland was the quickest boat through the second half of the race and brought it right down to one second between themselves and the Netherlands when they got to the line.

(Above and below) Irish rowers Fiona Murtagh and Airfic Keogh, with silver medals for the Women's Pair won at the World Cup Rowing at Lago di Varese, Italy

"It's our second event since Worlds, our second event in the pair together so we're constantly learning and this is a good start to the Olympic year" said Fiona Murtagh. On the last few months since the World Championships, Aifric Keogh said, "We've had a really good winter together, I think this is the longest we've ever been in one boat, usually it's a lot of chopping and changing so that's been nice, it gives us the space to try things out".

Irish rowers Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch, with bronze medals for the Men's Pair won at the World Cup Rowing at Lago di Varese, Italy(Above and below) Irish rowers Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch, with bronze medals for the Men's Pair won at the World Cup Rowing at Lago di Varese, Italy

In the Men's Double, Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch just squeezed past the German crew into third position coming to the line, the medals were theirs for the taking. "We had one of our fastest starts ever" says Doyle "And then we looked around and we weren't in the medal contentions. The plan was we had a sprint up our sleeves to go early at the 700 meters but then Daire called it early at 750 metres."

Irish rowers Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch, with bronze medals for the Men's Pair won at the World Cup Rowing at Lago di Varese, Italy

"A part of me was looking at the stroke coach thinking, how is this going to last? But, it did and int increased and the speed was good, and I knew from the speed on the stroke coach that we were coming into the medals no matter what happened because no one could match what we were doing".

Emily Hegarty (Skibbereen RC), Natalie Long (Lee Valley RC), Eimear Lambe (Old Collegians BC) and Imogen Magner (Carlow RC) crossed the line in fourth position in the Women's Four, just missing out on the podium. Coming through the pack in the middle of the race, it was the second half that Ireland really kicked into it, with their final quarter being the fastest that they did. Both Great Britain and the Netherlands have already booked their spots for this years Olympic Games so it's all to play for when it comes to the Final Olympic Qualification Regatta in May.

Sanita Puspure racing for Old Collegians BC finished 5th in the A Final of the Women's Single Scull. Sitting in sixth place right up until the last 500 meters, Sanita made started to wind it up for the last quarter moving as the third fastest boat, enough to bring her up a place to fifth. The podium positions went to Karolien Florijn of the Netherlands, Alexandra Foester of Germany and Inger Seim Kavlie of Norway.

Konan Pazzaia pulled out another incredible race this morning winning the B Final of the Men's Single. In one of the tightest races of the day, Pazzaia had the grandstand on their toes coming into the final few meters of the race. Andre Pinto of Portugal was ahead from the first marker, but from that point it was just bowballs separating him from Ireland. Konan stepped it up again for the famous Irish sprint but even as the crews crossed the line it was a close call to see who got it. In the end, Ireland came up on top just .6 of a second ahead.

Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan of Enniskillen, Fermanagh finished out their World Cup with a win in the B Final of the Men's Pair. It was the second German pair that had the quickest start off the blocks, but only just about, through the first 500 meters there was less than half a second separating the top three crews. Over the second quarter, Timoney and Corrigan began to create their lead, taking a boat length on the rest of the field. Finishing out strong they continued to pull away from Germany and Italy right to the line.

The Men's Four of John Kearney, Andrew Sheehan, Jack Dorney and Ronan Byrne finished third in their B Final. Denmark and Australia were the leading two crews from the start of the race however, Ireland put the pressure on coming into the final 500 meters where they clocked the fastest final split out of the four crews. Unfortunately, even with their impressive surge towards the line, it wasn't enough to get them ahead of the crew from Australia. They finish up the World Cup in 9th position overall.

Next up from the Irish Rowing High Performance team is the European Championships taking place in Szeged, Hungary from April 25th to 28th

Sunday Results

Women's Pair -> SILVER
Men's Double -> BRONZE
Women's Four -> 4th
Women's Single -> 5th
Men's Pair -> 1st B Final
Men's Single -> 1st B Final
Men's Four -> 3rd B Final

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

After a few miserable days in the lead-up to Rowing World Cup racing in Lago di Varese, Italy -, the sun finally shone on Lago di Varese as day two of the World Rowing Cup II got underway. The regatta saw four crews from Ireland compete for medals in the A Finals.

In the Men's Double, Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch dominated their repechage, leading the race from the start line to the finish. The Belfast and Clonmel rowers will go into tomorrow's A final with the quickest time out of the two repechages that raced today. They will be going head to head with the reigning World Champions, Stefan Broenink and Melvin Twellaar of the Netherlands, in a race not to be missed.

Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch dominated their repechage in the Men's DoublePhilip Doyle and Daire Lynch dominated their repechage in the Men's Double

Sanita Puspure of Old Collegians BC is back racing for medals in the Women's Single after qualifying today for the A Final. The top three crews from the A/B Semi would move through to the race for medals, and Puspure did what she had to do, finishing in second place behind the Norwegian sculler. With a conservative start, Sanita began closer to the back of the pack and made her way up through the field as the race progressed. Crews to watch in tomorrow's final are the undefeated two-time World Champion Karolien Florijn of the Netherlands and 2022 U23 World Champion Alexandra Foester of Germany.

The Men's Four of John Kearney, Andrew Sheehan, Jack Dorney, and Ronan Byrne finished fourth in their repechage, sending them through to tomorrow's B Final. Going out with a stronger start than yesterday's heat, Ireland passed the first marker in second position and the halfway mark in third. This move definitely played to their advantage, putting them in a better position coming into the final stretch.

The Men's Four of John Kearney, Andrew Sheehan, Jack Dorney, and Ronan ByrneThe Men's Four of John Kearney, Andrew Sheehan, Jack Dorney, and Ronan Byrne

Nathan Timoney of Enniskillen Royal BC and Ross Corrigan of Portora BC missed out on the Men's Pair A Final by just over three seconds. Finishing third behind Denmark and Italy in their repechage wasn't enough to see them through to the race for medals, as just two crews were to progress. Ireland stuck with the top group in the race, not drifting more than the three-second gap from the leading pairs. They will be up in the first race of the day tomorrow against Sweden, Italy, and two German crews.

Brian Colsh wrapped up his World Cup this morning in the C Final of the Men's Single. The Men's single scull is one of the most competitive events and attracted the largest number of entries at this regatta with 30 scullers on the start list. Through the second quarter of his race, Colsh squeezed ahead of the scullers from Monaco and Egypt and moved into second position. Winding it up into the finish, Brian was able to hold off Abdelkhalek Elbanna of Egypt in his late sprint for the line. Colsh leaves Italy 14th out of the 30 athletes.

Queen's University Belfast BC rower, Konan Pazzaia, finished fourth in the A/B Semi of the Men's Single, which sends him through to the B Final. Pazzaia went out hard to put himself in the three qualifying positions and managed to hold this right through to the third 500. George Bourne of Great Britain made his move at this point and just got ahead of the sculler from Ireland. Pazzaia didn't let him go easy, staying on his stern and finishing just two and a half seconds behind. He will be up against Portugal, Ukraine, Brazil, Spain, and Switzerland tomorrow morning in the B Final.

Saturday Results

Men's Double Repechage 1st -> A Final
Women's Single A/B Semi 2nd -> A Final
Men's Pair Repechage 3rd -> B Final
Men's Four Repechage 4th -> B Final
Men's Single (Pazzaia) A/B Semi 4th -> B Final
Men's Single (Colsh) C Final -> 2nd

Sunday Schedule (IST)

8:30am - Men's Pair B Final
8:48am - Men's Four B Final
9:00am - Men's Single (Pazzaia) B Final
10:05am - Women's Pair A Final
10:45am - Men's Double A Final
11:30am - Women's Four A Final
13:00pm - Women's Single A Final

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

The 2024 international rowing season has officially begun with the first World Cup in Italy, and the Irish crews have made their presence felt right from the start.

The Women's Four of Emily Hegarty, Natalie Long, Eimear Lambe, and Imogen Magner clinched first place in their heat, leaving the reigning World Champions, the Netherlands, behind. The Irish crew left it to their final sprint to move into the leading position, securing their place in the top two direct qualifying spots. Sunday's final promises to be an exciting event as the Irish crew looks forward to the challenge.

Sanita Puspure goes into the A/B semifinals on Saturday in the Rowing World Cup with the second-fastest time and hopes to make it to the top three spotsSanita Puspure goes into the A/B semifinals on Saturday in the Rowing World Cup with the second-fastest time and hopes to make it to the top three spots

Sanita Puspure, who had a challenging race in Tokyo, made a strong comeback in her single, crossing the line first in her heat. Puspure goes into the A/B semifinals on Saturday with the second-fastest time and hopes to make it to the top three spots, which will go on to the A Final. In the Women's Pair, Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh were the first to hit the water, finishing just one second behind the Netherlands, the 2023 World Championship gold medalists.

As a preliminary race for lanes, Sunday's final promises to be an interesting event with different strategies from the individual teams. Both of Ireland's Men's Scullers, Konan Pazzaia, and Brian Colsh, successfully progressed from their heats and qualified for this afternoon's Quarterfinals. Pazzaia held his position through the race, finishing in second place, while Colsh secured his spot in the Quarterfinals by finishing third in his heat.

Irish Men's Sculler Konan PazzaiaIrish Men's Sculler Konan Pazzaia

Irish Men's Sculler Konan PazzaiaIrish Men's Sculler Konan Pazzaia

Pazzaia bumped it up again in the Men's Single Quarterfinals, beating Quentin Antognelli from Monaco on the line to finish in third, securing the last qualifying spot to the A/B Semi. Tomorrow he'll face last year's World Champion, Ollie Zeidler from Germany. Colsh is into the C Final after a fifth place finish in his Quarterfinal. Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch are into tomorrow morning's repechage in the Men's Double, having just missed out on qualifying directly into the A Final.

The fastest two doubles will make it to the race for medals on Sunday. The Fermanagh pair of Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan finished fourth in the heat of the Men's Pair and are into tomorrow's repechage. The top two crews from the repechage will make it through to the A Final.

Ireland's M4 - Ronan Byrne, Jack Dorney, Andrew Sheehan and John KearneyIreland's M4 - Ronan Byrne, Jack Dorney, Andrew Sheehan and John Kearney

The Men's Four of John Kearney, Andrew Sheehan, Jack Dorney, and Ronan Byrne finished fifth in their heat and will race again tomorrow in the repechage. It's just two boats from a competitive field that will make it through to Sunday's A Final.

Saturday's schedule (IST) includes the Men's Single C Final (Colsh), Men's Pair Repechage, Men's Double Repechage, Men's Four Repechage, Women's Single A/B Semi, and Men's Single A/B Semi (Pazzaia).

Fans can look forward to a thrilling day of racing as Ireland continues to make its mark on the international stage.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

Due to the weather forecast, both the Neptune and Commercial rowing regattas in Dublin have been cancelled. The organisers have cited strong winds of 45k/hr and gusts of 90k/ph expected to hit Islandbridge as the cause.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

Ireland has announced the names of the athletes who will represent the country at the upcoming Rowing World Cup. The racing event is scheduled to take place from April 12 to April 14 in Varese, Italy.  Antonio Maurogiovanni, the High-Performance Director of Rowing Ireland, revealed the selected crews.

The women's four crew includes Emily Hegarty from Skibbereen RC, Natalie Long from Lee Valley RC, Eimear Lambe from Old Collegians BC, and Imogen Magner from Carlow RCThe women's four crew includes Emily Hegarty from Skibbereen RC, Natalie Long from Lee Valley RC, Eimear Lambe from Old Collegians BC, and Imogen Magner from Carlow RC

The women's four crew includes Emily Hegarty from Skibbereen RC, Natalie Long from Lee Valley RC, Eimear Lambe from Old Collegians BC, and Imogen Magner from Carlow RC. On the other hand, the men's four crew consists of John Kearney from UCC RC, Andrew Sheehan from UCC RC, Jack Dorney from Shandon BC/Harvard, and Ronan Byrne from Shandon RC.

Aifric Keogh & Fiona Murtagh will race for Ireland in W2 at the Rowing World Cup in Italy in AprilAifric Keogh & Fiona Murtagh will race for Ireland in W2 at the Rowing World Cup in Italy in April

Fiona Murtagh from the University of Galway RC and Aifric Keogh from Gráinne Mhaol RC will represent Ireland in the Women's Pair (Qualified boat for Paris). Meanwhile, Nathan Timoney from Enniskillen Royal BC and Ross Corrigan from Portora BC will form the Men's Pair (Qualified boat for Paris). In the Men's Double (Qualified boat for Paris), Philip Doyle from Belfast BC and Daire Lynch from Clonmel RC will represent Ireland.

Philip Doyle from Belfast BC and Daire Lynch from Clonmel RC will race in the Men’s Double (Qualified Boat for Paris)Philip Doyle from Belfast BC and Daire Lynch from Clonmel RC will race in the Men’s Double (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Sanita Puspure from Old Collegians BC will be the sole representative for Ireland in the Women's Single category. Konan Pazzaia from Queen's University Belfast BC and Brian Colsh from University of Galway BC will represent Ireland in the Men's Single category.

Selected Irish Crews for 2024 World Cup:

Women’s Four

Emily Hegarty (Skibbereen RC)
Natalie Long (Lee Valley RC)
Eimear Lambe (Old Collegians BC)
Imogen Magner (Carlow RC)

Men’s Four

John Kearney (UCC RC)
Andrew Sheehan (UCC RC)
Jack Dorney (Shandon BC/Harvard)
Ronan Byrne (Shandon RC)

Women’s Pair (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Fiona Murtagh (University of Galway RC)
Aifric Keogh (Gráinne Mhaol RC)

Men’s Pair (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Nathan Timoney (Enniskillen Royal BC)
Ross Corrigan (Portora BC)

Men’s Double (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Philip Doyle (Belfast BC)
Daire Lynch (Clonmel RC)

Women’s Single

Sanita Puspure (Old Collegians BC)

Men’s Single

Konan Pazzaia (Queen’s University Belfast BC)
Brian Colsh (University of Galway BC)

More information regarding the 2024 World Cup can be found here

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

Lurgan’s Linda Blakely aims to cross the treacherous 3,000-mile Atlantic Ocean in a 12-foot boat aptly named Ulster Warrior, reports the Sunday Life.

She will start 2024 attempting to break a world record for a female solo rower, which is 40 days and 19 hours, set by 35-year-old Englishwoman Victoria Evans in 2022. Linda, who will be 50 about halfway through the challenge aims to raise £100,000 for the charity Action Medical Research.

She plans to set off from Gran Canaria to St Lucia in the Caribbean on January 7, weather-permitting, and hopes to arrive in St Lucia 40 days later, where her brother Peter and his family will be there to welcome her ashore.

Linda lives in London, where she runs three homes for young people with special needs. In 2018, she became the first woman in the UK to summit both Everest and Lhotse within a day.

Other accolades are competition in Iron Man challenges and winning a silver medal in European championships in long-distance triathlons with Team GB.

She tells the Belfast Telegraph that her mission is to become the fastest woman in the world to cross the Atlantic alone. She explains: “When I first thought about doing it, the record was 49 days, which seemed to be there for the taking, but then Victoria (Evans) did it in 40 days. She set a tough benchmark. Until this year, I had never rowed before, but I have a great club in London, the Sons of the Thames, who have taken me under their wing and taught me how to row, and I’ve been doing some racing with them.”

More from Sunday Life here

Published in Coastal Rowing
Tagged under

Ireland's rowing team has made history at the 2023 World Rowing Championships, finishing the competition with four medals and securing seven crews for the Paris 2024 event. This marks the most crews that Ireland has ever qualified for at the World Championships, with only four crews qualifying during the Tokyo cycle. 

Although some crews did not qualify, they still have a chance at the Final Qualification Regatta in May. One of the highlights of the event was Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch's bronze medal win in the men's double. The duo started slow and were at the back of the pack in the first 1000 metres. However, they made a strong comeback and secured the bronze medal, racing right to the line with the Croatian double and coming in just one second behind the Sinkovic's. 

Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde, the young women's double, also put in a commendable performance, managing to stay at the top of the pack throughout the race and finishing in fourth place. They missed out on a podium finish by just one and a half seconds, but their impressive performance has marked them as a crew to watch in the future. 

This historic week for Irish rowing has seen incredible racing, with the team's eye now firmly set on the Paris event next year. The team's performance has demonstrated that they are on the up, and the future looks bright for Irish rowing.

Day 7 Results

Men's Double A Final -> BRONZE
Women's Double A Final - > 4th

Overall Results
Lightweight Men's Double -> GOLD and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Lightweight Women's Scull -> GOLD
Men's Pair -> BRONZE and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Men's Double -> BRONZE and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Pair -> 4th and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Double -> 4th and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
PR2 Mixed Double -> 5th and PARALYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Lightweight women's Double -> 1st B Final and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
W4- -> 3rd B Final
M4x -> 1st C Final
M4- -> 3rd C Final
LM1x -> 5th D Final

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

Irish crews have secured two more medals and one more Paris 2024 qualification on Day 7 of the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia. This brings Ireland's total to seven Paris 2024 qualifications, marking the largest number of qualifications in Rowing Ireland's history.

Lightweight Men's Double Scull World Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan have defended their title for another year, clinching gold with another dominant performance. Despite the Swiss taking an early lead, McCarthy and O'Donovan showed their strength in the second half of the race, crossing the finish line ahead of Switzerland and Italy. This marks their third consecutive World Championship win.

A third consecutive World Championship win for Lightweight Men's Double Scullers Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'DonovanA third consecutive World Championship win for Lightweight Men's Double Scullers Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan

Lightweight Men's Double Scull World defending Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan top the podium at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaLightweight Men's Double Scull World defending Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan top the podium at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan from Enniskillen secured another medal for Ireland with a bronze in the Men's pair. They led the race for the first half, taking the Swiss and Great Britain by surprise. Although favourites for the gold medal, Tom George and Ollie Wynne-Griffith from GB came back in the third quarter of the race and battled down to the line with Timoney and Corrigan for second place. In the end, Switzerland took the lead, and Ireland just missed out on the surge and had to settle for the bronze medal.

Bronze medalists - Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney with coach Nicolo Maurogiovanni and Rowing Ireland High Performance Director Antonio Maurogiovanni Bronze medalists - Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney with coach Nicolo Maurogiovanni and Rowing Ireland High Performance Director Antonio Maurogiovanni 

Aoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B final. Though nerves were high before they took to the water, Casey and Cremen remained cool and collected, finishing with clear water over the field. They finished the World Championships in seventh place and secured a spot for next year.

Aoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B finalAoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B final and below pictured with family in Serbia

In the PR2 Mix2x, Katie O'Brien and Steven McGowan took fifth place in the world. After qualifying for the Paralympics earlier in the week, they had a bit of a rough start when they caught a crab in the second half of the race. However, they quickly regained their composure and finished strong.

"This brings Ireland's total to seven Paris 2024 qualifications, marking the largest number of qualifications in Rowing Ireland's history"

Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh just missed out on a podium finish, coming in fourth place. Though they fought hard to get into medal position in the last 500 meters, they were narrowly beaten by crews from the Netherlands, Australia, and Romania.

Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Lambe, and Natalie Long finished in third place in the B final of the women's four. Though they were hot on the heels of the crew from Denmark, New Zealand claimed the qualification position in the end.

Finally, John Kearney, Jack Dorney, Adam Browne, and Fionnán McQuillan-Tolan finished in third place in the C final of the men's four. Despite starting from the back of the pack, they showed incredible perseverance in the last 500 meters and finished nearly neck and neck with the Chinese four. Nevertheless, China claimed second position across the line.

Overall, it was an impressive showing for the Irish crews, who proved their strength and skill on the international stage.

Day 7 Results

Lightweight Men's Double A Final -> GOLD
Men['s Pair A Final -> BRONZE
Lightweight Women's Double B Final ->1st and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Pair A Final -> 4th
PR2 Mixed Double A Final -> 5th
Women's Four B Final -> 3rd
Men's Quad C Final -> 1st
Men's Four C Final -> 3rd

Sunday Schedule (IST)

12:39pm - Men's Double A Final
12:54pm - Women's Double A Final

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

Siobhán McCrohan, a member of the Tribesmen Rowing Club in Ireland, secured a gold medal in the lightweight women's sculls final at the World Rowing Championships held in Belgrade, Serbia. McCrohan, aged 36, faced stiff competition from Mexican Kenia Lechuga and American Sophia Luwis, but her outstanding performance earned her the top spot on the podium. 

Despite the gruelling conditions in Belgrade, McCrohan executed her race plan to perfection. She paced herself in the early stages of the race while Martine Veldhuis of the Netherlands took an early lead. By the 500m mark, McCrohan had settled into third place behind Veldhuis and Lechuga, with the Dutch women already being reeled in. 

McCrohan improved to second place at the halfway point, sitting on the shoulder of Lechuga, just 0.27 behind the Mexican as Veldhuis was unable to keep pace and dropped out of the reckoning. Luwis then forced her way into the conversation, putting pressure on McCrohan, who kept her cool and stuck to her race plan, waiting for her moment to attack as she, Veldhuis, and Luwis pulled away from the chasing pack. 

McCrohan made her move as the scullers passed the 1500m mark. She upped her work rate and, with 300m to go, overtook Veldhuis, never looking back. With clear, calm water in front of her, she extended her lead in the closing stages, pulling away from Lechuga and Luwis, leaving the Mexican to win the battle for silver. 

McCrohan finished the race in 8:47.96, securing her first world championship gold medal after returning to representing Ireland this summer following a seven-year absence. Although she finished just off the podium in June's European Championships, she claimed world glory in her first season back in the boat, albeit in a non-Olympic class. 

"I only really came back to proper training in the winter of this season, so it's been a good comeback!" McCrohan told RTÉ Sport. "It wasn't so much that I made a decision that I should come back; it was that I couldn't stay away any longer." 

McCrohan's gold medal is a significant achievement for the Tribesmen Rowing Club member, who is traditionally used to the fast-flowing waters of the River Corrib. Although she had to face offshore winds in Belgrade, she took them in her stride, saying, "We all have to row in the same conditions, so it's worth noting that the race just takes longer." 

McCrohan's victory adds to the success of the Irish team at the World Rowing Championships. Both the men's and women's double sculls crews secured their boats' places at Paris 2024 for Ireland.

Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch finished just over a second behind the Croatian boat in their semi-final, while Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde were also second, closely behind Americans Kristina Wagner and Sophia Vitas. 

While Jake McCarthy finished fifth in the lightweight men's single sculls D Final, McCrohan's gold medal will undoubtedly be a highlight of Ireland's performance at this year's championships.

Watch the World Rowing Championships on Saturday and Sunday from 12 pm on the RTE News Channel and RTE Player.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

Three Irish rowing crews have qualified for the A and B finals at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia, and secured their spots at the Paris Olympics next summer.

Irish Women's Pair Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh. With a second-place finish, the two Galway rowers are into the A Final. Murtagh and Keogh have shown good speed throughout this Championships and will be leaving it all on the line this Saturday in the hopes of making it on to that podium. at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaIrish Women's Pair Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh. With a second-place finish, the two Galway rowers are into the A Final. Murtagh and Keogh have shown good speed throughout this Championships and will be leaving it all on the line this Saturday in the hopes of making it on to that podium. at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh put in an impressive performance to secure a women's pair spot for Ireland. The duo finished second in their semi-final, just behind the Romanian pair of Roxana Anghel and Ioana Vrinceanu.

22 year old Nathan Timoney and 24 year old Ross Corrigan have been on top form this week and have today qualified a men's pair for Ireland at Paris 2024. Timoney and Corrigan grew up rowing together with Enniskillen Royal BC in Fermanagh and are putting themselves up there with the top crews here at the World Championships. Ireland went out hard and held second position right from the start. With South Africa hot on their heels coming into the final sprint, they took it up another gear finishing with the fastest final 500. Their second place result sends them through to Saturday's A Final where they'll race the best of the best.22 year old Nathan Timoney and 24 year old Ross Corrigan have been on top form this week and have today qualified a men's pair for Ireland at Paris 2024. Timoney and Corrigan grew up rowing together with Enniskillen Royal BC in Fermanagh and are putting themselves up there with the top crews here at the World Championships. Ireland went out hard and held second position right from the start. With South Africa hot on their heels coming into the final sprint, they took it up another gear finishing with the fastest final 500. Their second place result sends them through to Saturday's A Final where they'll race the best of the best.

Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan also secured a men's pair spot for Ireland at Paris 2024. The pair came in second in their semi-final, with South Africa hot on their heels in the final sprint.

Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy have secured a spot at Paris for the lightweight men's double. Making it look easy, O'Donovan and McCarthy held their composure through the first half of the race, passing the first marker in fifth place and the halfway mark in second place. Relying on their incredible strength and fitness, they were able to focus on their own race and one by one came through the other crews. In the end they finished with clear water ahead of the field with Czechia and Norway coming in behind them to take the remaining two spots to the A Final.Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy have secured a spot at Paris for the lightweight men's double. Making it look easy, O'Donovan and McCarthy held their composure through the first half of the race, passing the first marker in fifth place and the halfway mark in second place. Relying on their incredible strength and fitness, they were able to focus on their own race and one by one came through the other crews. In the end they finished with clear water ahead of the field with Czechia and Norway coming in behind them to take the remaining two spots to the A Final

Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy secured a spot in the lightweight men's double, dominating their semi-final and finishing with clear water ahead of the field.

However, the lightweight women's double of Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey narrowly missed out on an A final spot and will race in the B final on Saturday.

Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Magner, and Natalie Long finished in fifth place in the women's four, sending them through to the B final.

Siobhán McCrohan put in a stellar performance in the lightweight women's scull, winning her A/B semi-final and securing a place in the A final.

Tribesmen's Siobhán McCrohan is into the lightweight women's scull A Final after a win in her A/B Semi. Handling the tough conditions like a pro, McCrohan sailed over the waves and held a consistent speed throughout the race. Moving into the leading position in the third quarter, there was no looking back as she continued to pull away from the other crews. She will race the A Final tomorrow afternoon where she will be looking for a place on the podium.Tribesmen's Siobhán McCrohan is into the lightweight women's scull A Final after a win in her A/B Semi. Handling the tough conditions like a pro, McCrohan sailed over the waves and held a consistent speed throughout the race. Moving into the leading position in the third quarter, there was no looking back as she continued to pull away from the other crews. She will race the A Final tomorrow afternoon where she will be looking for a place on the podium.

Siobhán McCrohan in the lightweight women's scull at the World Rowing Championships in Bled, Slovenia

Jake McCarthy will compete in the D final of the lightweight men's scull against New Zealand, Norway, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Finland.

All six crews have done Ireland proud, and rowing fans will be eagerly anticipating their performances in the A and B finals.

Day 5 Results (Irish interest)
Women's Pair A/B Semi 2nd -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Men's Pair A/B Semi 2nd -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Lightweight Men's Double A/B Semi 1st -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Lightweight Women's Double A/B Semi 4th -> B Final
Women's Four A/B Semi 5th -> B Final
Lightweight Women's Scull A/B Semi 1st -> A Final
Lightweight Men's Scull A/B Semi 6th -> D Final

Friday Schedule (IST)
9:45am - Men's Double A/B Semi
9:55am - Women's Double A/B Semi
12:05pm - Lightweight Men's D Final
13:15pm - Lightweight Women's A Final

Published in Rowing
Tagged under
Page 1 of 86

Port of Cork Information

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of only two Irish ports which service the requirements of all six shipping modes i.e., Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise. Due to its favourable location on the south coast of Ireland and its modern deep-water facilities, the Port of Cork is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services.

The Port of Cork is investing €80 million in a container terminal development in Ringaskiddy. The Cork Container Terminal will initially offer a 360-metre quay with 13-metre depth alongside and will enable larger ships to berth in the port. The development also includes the construction of a 13.5-hectare terminal and associated buildings as well as two ship to shore gantry cranes and container handling equipment.

The development of new container handling facilities at Ringaskiddy was identified in the Port of Cork’s Strategic Development Plan in 2010. It will accommodate current and future container shipping which can be serviced by modern and efficient cargo handling equipment with innovative terminal operating and vehicle booking systems. The Port of Cork anticipates that Cork Container Terminal will be operational in 2020.

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of just two Irish ports which service the requirements of all shipping modes.

The Port of Cork also controls Bantry Bay Port Company and employs 150 people across all locations.

A European Designated Core Port and a Tier 1 Port of National Significance, Port of Cork’s reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround as well as the company’s investment in future growth, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain.

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades, most recently with the construction of the new €80m Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy which will facilitate the natural progression of the move from a river port to a deepwater port in order to future proof the Port
of Cork. This state-of-the-art terminal which will open in 2020 will be capable of berthing the largest container ships currently calling to Ireland.

The Port of Cork Company is a commercial semi-state company responsible for the commercial running of the harbour as well as responsibility for navigation and berthage in the port.  The Port is the main port serving the South of Ireland, County Cork and Cork City. 

Types of Shipping Using Port of Cork

The Port offers all six shipping modes from Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise liner traffic.

Port of Cork Growth

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades. Since 2000, the Port of Cork has invested €72 million in improving Port infrastructure and facilities. Due to its favourable location and its modern deepwater facilities, the Port is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services. A well-developed road infrastructure eases the flow of traffic from and to the port. The Port of Cork’s growing reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain. The Port of Cork Company turnover in 2018 amounted to €35.4 million, an increase of €3.9 million from €31.5 million in 2017. The combined traffic of both the Ports of Cork and Bantry increased to 10.66 million tonnes in 2018 up from 10.3 million tonnes in 2017.

History of Port of Cork

Famous at the last port of call of the Titanic, these medieval navigation and port facilities of the city and harbour were historically managed by the Cork Harbour Commissioners. Founded in 1814, the Cork Harbour Commissioners moved to the Custom House in 1904.  Following the implementation of the 1996 Harbours Act, by March 1997 all assets of the Commissioners were transferred to the Port of Cork Company.

Commercial Traffic at Port of Cork

Vessels up to 90,000 tonnes deadweight (DWT) are capable of coming through entrance to Cork Harbour. As the shipping channels get shallower the farther inland one travels, access becomes constricted, and only vessels up to 60,000 DWT can sail above Cobh. The Port of Cork provides pilotage and towage facilities for vessels entering Cork Harbour. All vessels accessing the quays in Cork City must be piloted and all vessels exceeding 130 metres in length must be piloted once they pass within 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) of the harbour entrance.

Berthing Facilities in Cork Harbour

The Port of Cork has berthing facilities at Cork City, Tivoli, Cobh and Ringaskiddy. The facilities in Cork City are primarily used for grain and oil transport. Tivoli provides container handling, facilities for oil, livestock and ore and a roll on-roll off (Ro-Ro) ramp. Prior to the opening of Ringaskiddy Ferry Port, car ferries sailed from here; now, the Ro-Ro ramp is used by companies importing cars into Ireland. In addition to the ferry terminal, Ringaskiddy has a deep water port.

Port of Cork Development Plans

2020 will be a significant year for the Port of Cork as it prepares to complete and open the €86 million Cork Container Terminal development in Ringaskiddy.

Once operational the new terminal will enable the port to handle up to 450,000 TEU per annum. Port of Cork already possess significant natural depth in Cork harbour, and the work in Ringaskiddy Port will enable the Port of Cork to accommodate vessels of 5500 to 6000 TEU, which will provide a great deal of additional potential for increasing container traffic.

It follows a previous plan hatched in 2006 as the port operated at full capacity the Port drew up plans for a new container facility at Ringaskiddy. This was the subject of major objections and after an Oral Planning Hearing was held in 2008 the Irish planning board Bord Pleanala rejected the plan due to inadequate rail and road links at the location.  

Further notable sustainability projects also include:

  • The Port of Cork have invested in 2 x STS cranes – Type single lift, Model P (148) L, (WS) Super. These cranes contain the most modern and energy-efficient control and monitoring systems currently available on the market and include an LED floodlight system equipped with software to facilitate remote diagnostics, a Crane Management System (CMS) and an energy chain supply on both cranes replacing the previous preferred festoon cabling installation.
  • The Port of Cork has installed High Mast Lighting Voltage Control Units at its two main cargo handling locations – Tivoli Industrial & Dock Estate and Ringaskiddy Deep-water & Ferry Terminals. This investment has led to more efficient energy use and reduced risk of light pollution. The lights can also be controlled remotely.
  • The Port of Cork’s largest electrical consumer at Tivoli Container Terminal is the handling and storage of refrigerated containers. Local data loggers were used to assess energy consumption. This provided timely intervention regarding Power Factor Correction Bank efficiency on our STS (Ship to Shore) Cranes and Substations, allowing for reduced mains demand and reducing wattless energy losses along with excess charges. The information gathered has helped us to design and build a reefer storage facility with energy management and remote monitoring included.

Bantry Port

In 2017 Bantry Bay Port Company completed a significant investment of €8.5 million in the Bantry Inner Harbour development. The development consisted of a leisure marina, widening of the town pier, dredging of the inner harbour and creation of a foreshore amenity space.

Port of Cork Cruise Liner Traffic

2019 was a record cruise season for the Port of Cork with 100 cruise liners visiting. In total over 243,000 passengers and crew visited the region with many passengers visiting Cork for the first time.

Also in 2019, the Port of Cork's Cruise line berth in Cobh was recognised as one of the best cruise destinations in the world, winning in the Top-Rated British Isles & Western Europe Cruise Destination category. 

There has been an increase in cruise ship visits to Cork Harbour in the early 21st century, with 53 such ships visiting the port in 2011, increasing to approximately 100 cruise ship visits by 2019.

These cruise ships berth at the Port of Cork's deepwater quay in Cobh, which is Ireland's only dedicated berth for cruise ships.

Passenger Ferries

Operating since the late 1970s, Brittany Ferries runs a ferry service to Roscoff in France. This operates between April and November from the Ro-Ro facilities at Ringaskiddy. Previous ferry services ran to Swansea in Wales and Santander in Spain. The former, the Swansea Cork ferry, ran initially between 1987 and 2006 and also briefly between 2010 and 2012.

The latter, a Brittany Ferries Cork–Santander service, started in 2018 but was cancelled in early 2020.

Marine Leisure

The Port of Cork has a strategy that aims to promote the harbour also as a leisure amenity. Cork’s superb natural harbour is a great place to enjoy all types of marine leisure pursuits. With lots of sailing and rowing clubs dotted throughout the harbour, excellent fishing and picturesque harbour-side paths for walking, running or cycling, there is something for everyone to enjoy in and around Cork harbour. The Port is actively involved with the promotion of Cork Harbour's annual Festival. The oldest sailing club in the world, founded in 1720, is the Royal Cork Yacht Club is located at Crosshaven in the harbour, proof positive, says the Port, that the people of Cork, and its visitors, have been enjoying this vast natural leisure resource for centuries. 

Port of Cork Executives

  • Chairman: John Mullins
  • Chief Executive: Brendan Keating
  • Secretary/Chief Finance Officer: Donal Crowley
  • Harbour Master and Chief Operations Officer: Capt. Paul O'Regan
  • Port Engineering Manager: Henry Kingston
  • Chief Commercial Officer: Conor Mowlds
  • Head of Human Resources: Peter O'Shaughnessy