Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Clean Coasts 'Big Beach Clean' Begins Tomorrow And Weekend of 15th-16th September

13th September 2018
1191 Views
Get Involved!... in this year's Clean Coast's Big Beach Clean and make positive action through volunteering tomorrow or over this weekend of 15-16th September. Get Involved!... in this year's Clean Coast's Big Beach Clean and make positive action through volunteering tomorrow or over this weekend of 15-16th September. Photo: Clean Coast's - twitter

#MarineWildlife - Clean Coasts 'Big Beach Clean' returns to Ireland in 2018 beginning tomorrow, with the volunteer effort continuing throughout this weekend of 15th-16th September.

So join in and take positive action by raising awareness of the massive damage caused by marine litter pollution on the natural world. This can be done by registering online as a Clean Coast group or why not organise your own event with family and friends.  

Once again Clean Coasts, An Taisce's Environmental Education Unit, is teaming up with the Ocean Conservancy for the International Coastal Cleanup event.

Clean Coasts in 2018 is to continue the growth and success of last year's Big Beach Clean, by increasing the number of beach cleans along the Irish coastline. In addition it is their aim to increase the amount of marine litter data collection.

As with previous years, Clean Coasts beach clean packs will contain marine litter data collection cards. This year they will also be encouraging their groups to use the Clean Swell App by Ocean Conservancy and will add a marine data portal to the Clean Coasts website. This will make it easier for volunteers to submit data collected on the beach cleans.

According to Clean Coasts, last year the international event involved 789,138 volunteers taking part from more than 100 countries. Collectively they accumulated nearly 20.5 million pounds (or 9.3 million kilograms) of marine litter.

As in previous years, among the principle litter culprits, cigarette butts—which contain plastic filters—topped the list at approximately 2.4 million collected. This category was followed by food wrappers (1.7 million), plastic beverage bottles (1.6 million), plastic bottle caps (1.1 million), and plastic grocery bags (757,523) rounding out the top five.

Clean Coast encourages everyone to enjoy being part of the movement for litter free seas in addition to being part of the world’s largest coastal cleanup event. Also for those participating in the marine litter survey.

For further information on Clean Coast, the Big Beach Clean and much more visit their website here.

Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

Email The Author

Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

Marine Wildlife Around Ireland One of the greatest memories of any day spent boating around the Irish coast is an encounter with marine wildlife.  It's a thrill for young and old to witness seabirds, seals, dolphins and whales right there in their own habitat. As boaters fortunate enough to have experienced it will testify even spotting a distant dorsal fin can be the highlight of any day afloat.  Was that a porpoise? Was it a whale? No matter how brief the glimpse it's a privilege to share the seas with Irish marine wildlife.

Thanks to the location of our beautiful little island, perched in the North Atlantic Ocean there appears to be no shortage of marine life to observe.

From whales to dolphins, seals, sharks and other ocean animals this page documents the most interesting accounts of marine wildlife around our shores. We're keen to receive your observations, your photos, links and youtube clips.

Boaters have a unique perspective and all those who go afloat, from inshore kayaking to offshore yacht racing that what they encounter can be of real value to specialist organisations such as the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) who compile a list of sightings and strandings. The IWDG knowledge base has increased over the past 21 years thanks in part at least to the observations of sailors, anglers, kayakers and boaters.

Thanks to the IWDG work we now know we share the seas with dozens of species who also call Ireland home. Here's the current list: Atlantic white-sided dolphin, beluga whale, blue whale, bottlenose dolphin, common dolphin, Cuvier's beaked whale, false killer whale, fin whale, Gervais' beaked whale, harbour porpoise, humpback whale, killer whale, minke whale, northern bottlenose whale, northern right whale, pilot whale, pygmy sperm whale, Risso's dolphin, sei whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, sperm whale, striped dolphin, True's beaked whale and white-beaked dolphin.

But as impressive as the species list is the IWDG believe there are still gaps in our knowledge. Next time you are out on the ocean waves keep a sharp look out!

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

DBSC
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club

Featured Brokers

mgm sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events

corkweek sidebutton
tokyo sidebutton
roundireland sidebutton
wave regatta
sovscup sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
viking sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating