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Displaying items by tag: Royal Cork Yacht Club

Four straight wins for the Malahide and Wexford Harbour pairing of Jack McDowell and Henry Thompson means they overtake the overnight leaders Imogen Hauer and Hugo Micka in the 420 Class of the Investwise Youth Sailing National Championships at Royal Cork.

Hauer and Micka are now third overall on 15 points, with Lough Ree's Owen Duffy and Conor Paul squeezing into second place on 12 points after seven races sailed. 

The 420 fleet sailed trapezoid coursesThe 420 fleet sailed trapezoid courses Photo: Bob Bateman

This year, the 420 numbers are reduced at the Nationals, a disappointment for double-handed followers, especially given the impressive 21-boat showing at Howth for the National Championships in August. 

Racing continues tomorrow, with more trapezoid courses expected off the Whitegate refinery in Cork Harbour.

420: Sailed: 7, Discards: 1, To count: 6, Entries: 9420: Sailed: 7, Discards: 1, To count: 6, Entries: 9

 420 Youth Nationals Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman - Day 2

Published in 420

After three races sailed in the 29er Skiff Class at the Investwise Youth Sailing Championships at Royal Cork, two of the Irish gold fleet finishers at the European Championships on Lake Garda in Italy on Wednesday continue neck and neck in Cork Harbour on Friday.

As regular Afloat readers will know, Royal Cork's James Dwyer and Ben O'Shaughnessy of the RCYC  finished 18th at the Euros with Clementine van Steenberge with Chiara Carra of the Royal St. George YC, three places behind in 21st place. 

After four races sailed in Cork Harbour, the battle continues with Dwyer and O'Shaughnessy one point ahead of the Royal St George girls. Another George pairing, sisters Emily and Jessica Riordan, are lying third. 

The fight for the lead of the 29er fleet was very impressive with the level of competition and standard of racingThe fight for the lead of the 29er fleet was very impressive with the level of competition and standard of racing on show Photo: Bob Bateman.

Top Irish performers at the Euros (finishing 11th), Tim Norwood and Nathan van Steenberge of the Royal Irish, are in fourth place, principally due to retiral in the second race this morning. They won the opening race and were fifth in the third.

The Irish team is adjusting from the big fleet tactics required for the massive 200 boats European fleet earlier this week to the much more modest 11 boat domestic fleet gathered on the Cuskinny Bank.

Racing continues tomorrow.

29er: Sailed: 4, Discards: 0, To count: 4, Entries: 1129er: Sailed: 4, Discards: 0, To count: 4, Entries: 11

 29er Youth Nationals Day 2 Photo Gallery By Bob Bateman

Published in 29er

Malahide’s Imogen Hauer and Hugo Micka have a one point overnight lead in the first day of racing in a nine boat 420 class fleet at the Investwise Youth Sailing Championships on Cork Harbour.

Lough Ree’s Eoghan Duffy with Conor Paul are a point behind the Dublin crew but only on tie-break from Jack McDowell with Henry Thompson, a Malahide and Wexford Harbour combination.

Racing continues tomorrow at Royal Cork Yacht Club

420 class Sailed: 3, Discards: 0, To count: 3, Entries: 9420 class Sailed: 3, Discards: 0, To count: 3, Entries: 9

Published in 420

After a dramatic conclusion to the final day of Royal Cork's AIB Autumn League where racing in all classes was abandoned and one yacht went aground in Cork Harbour, prizes were presented at the Crosshaven clubhouse based on overall results after six races sailed.

In the three boat IRC SPIN 0 Division, Conor Phelan's, Ker 37 Jump Juice won overall but shared the same seven points as Annamarie and Denis Murphy's Grand Soliel 40 Nieulargo.

Jump Juice were winners in both IRC and Club Echo Class 0. Barry Rose (left) presents the Rose TrophyJump Juice were winners in both IRC and Club Echo Class 0. The prize is collected by long time Jump crewman John Sisk. Barry Rose (left) presents the Rose Trophy for the best IRC performance Photo: Bob Bateman

Molly Murphy collects the prize for  Nieulargo (Denis Murphy and Annamarie Fegan) IRC spin 0 winner and second in Club EchoMolly Murphy collects the prize for Nieulargo (Denis Murphy and Annamarie Fegan) IRC spin 0 winner and second in Club Echo Photo: Bob Bateman

In the seven boat IRC SPIN 1 division, Kieran Collins Olson 30 Coracle IV emerged with a one-point margin after six races sailed over the Jones Family J.109 Jelly Baby that went aground and was successfully recovered. Third was the Kinsale sistership Artful Dodjer skippered by Finbarr O'Regan.

Kieran Collins sailing Coracle, was first in IRC Spi 1 and third in Echo Spi 1Kieran Collins sailing Coracle, was first in IRC Spi 1 and third in Echo Spi 1 Photo: Bob Bateman

Artful Dodjer was third in IRC spin 1 and second in Club Echo. The prize received by Nieulargo skipper Denis Murphy for Finbarr O'ReganArtful Dodjer was third in IRC spin 1 and second in Club Echo. The prize was received by Nieulargo skipper Denis Murphy for Finbarr O'Regan Photo: Bob Bateman

Dave Lane's J24 YaGottaWanna won overall on ten points in the nine boat SPIN 2 IRC division from Fiona Young's Albin Express North Star on 13 points. The Tony Donworth Quarter Tonner SuperNova is third on 14 points. Lane's performance gave him the overall win of the  AIB Series.

J/24 Ya Gotta Wanna (Dave Lane) was the Overall winner of the AIB Autumn Series and won both IRC Spin 2 and Club Echo  divisionsJ/24 Ya Gotta Wanna (Dave Lane) was the overall winner of the AIB Autumn Series and won both IRC Spin 2 and Club Echo divisions Photo: Bob Bateman

Tony Donworth's Supernova was second in IRC Two and Echo TwoTony Donworth's Supernova was second in IRC Two and Echo Two Photo: Bob Bateman

Ritchie Leonard was third in IRC Spin 2 division Photo: Bob Bateman

The J/24 Under 25 teamChris Bateman (centre) pictured the J/24 Under 25 team Photo: Bob Bateman

Michael McCann's Etchells 22 Don't Dilly Dally of the Sportsboats classMichael McCann's Etchells 22 Don't Dilly Dally of the Sportsboats class Photo: Bob Bateman

Frank Caul and John Molloy sailing Prince of Tides were Echo WS1 division winnersFrank Caul and John Molloy sailing Prince of Tides were Echo WS1 division winners Photo: Bob Bateman

Roy Hanan, Pat Barrett sailing Plumbat were  Echo WS2 division winnersRoy Hanan, Pat Barrett sailing Plumbat were Echo WS2 division winners Photo: Bob Bateman

Kieran O'Brien's Magnet was the IRC WS2 winnerKieran O'Brien's Magnet was the IRC WS2 winner Photo: Bob Bateman

Published in Royal Cork YC

From a sad scene of what appeared to be nearly certain destruction for a racing yacht, a Cork Harbour Coastguard led team has successfully refloated the J/109 that grounded at the mouth of the harbour this afternoon.

As Afloat reported earlier, the Jelly Baby came to grief at Weavers Point during the final race of Royal Cork Yacht Club's Autumn League around noon.

After the yacht broached and hit rocks, all ten crew made it ashore safely, some climbing the harbour rocks to do so.

The grounded yacht stood on its keel at Bull Rock and was being pounded by the waves for several hours until the Coastguard and a salvage team could successfully get her off the rock and refloat her on a rising tide.

Jelly Baby under tow back to CrosshavenJelly Baby under tow back to Crosshaven

Jelly Baby is hauled out at Crosshaven Boatyard with hull damage clearly visible following her afternoon on the rocksJ109 Jelly Baby is hauled out at Crosshaven Boatyard with hull damage clearly visible following her afternoon on the rocks

Published in Cork Harbour

All crew are reported safe, but a top racing yacht of the Royal Cork Yacht Club is on the rocks at Cork Harbour after a Mayday emergency incident on the final day of racing in the Club's Autumn League.

After the race rounded a weather mark, the Class One yacht Jelly Baby broached, and it is understood that a crew member from the boat went overboard.

According to eyewitness accounts, the crewman was recovered safely by the ten strong J/109 crew, but the rescue manoeuvres, brought Jelly Baby close inshore and near the rocks at the harbour mouth. 

Despite efforts to clear the lee shore, the yacht ended up on the rocks at Weaver's Point at a point known locally as Bull Rock.

Two crew went overboard. One was picked up by a competitor and the other by a RIB. 

The incident led to to an emergency Mayday call responded to by the RNLI at Crosshaven and the local Coastguard Unit and the Port Of Cork Pilot launch.

Coastguard attend the scene at Weaver's Point where a yacht went agroundCoastguard attend the scene at Weaver's Point where a yacht went aground

The rest of the crew made their way to safety by climbing the rocky cliff at Weaver's Point, an elevation of approximately 20 metres, at the mouth of Cork Harbour.

Jelly Baby on the rocks

The J109 yacht Jelly Baby at Weavers PointThe J109 yacht Jelly Baby at Weavers Point

Racing has been abandoned. 

Coastguard Hopes to Refloat 'Jelly Baby' at high Water

Coastguard volunteers attend the J109 Jelly Baby aground at Weaver's PointCoastguard volunteers attend the J109 Jelly Baby aground at Weaver's Point

Update at 3.20 pm:  The yacht remains aground and an attempt to re-float it will be made by the Crosshaven Coastguard team closer to high water.

The Coast Guard has set up a cordon near the boat.

Update: 6.30 pm: The yacht is successfully refloated. See vid here.

Jelly Baby on the rocks

Jelly Baby on the rocks

Published in Cork Harbour

Royal Cork's Jonathan O'Shaughnessy and Michael Crosbie, who put in a strong showing at the Laser Europa Cup in Hyeres, France, are the favourites for youth honours this Thursday in Cork Harbour.

O'Shaughnessy finished just outside the important top ten in 11th and Crosbie 21st in a tense edition of the Under-18 test.

More than 260 sailors participated in the French regatta, and full results are here.

Radial racing in Cork HarbourRadial racing in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

It's a result that confirms O'Shaughnessy, who took the Radial National title in August, and Crosbie, who was the winner of the Kinsale Laser end of Season Regatta in October, as favourites for the Investwise Youth Sailing Nationals at Royal Cork later this week. 

Rocco Wright (Howth YC)Rocco Wright (Howth YC) Photo: Bob Bateman

It'll be a new look Radial fleet in Cork with some new names into the fleet, including Rocco Wright (Howth YC), who dominated the 4.7 National Championships back in August.

Michael CrosbieMichael Crosbie Photo: Bob Bateman

New names into 4.7s

As well as some high profile departures from the ILCA4 (Laser 4.7s), there's also some new entries into the class.

Sienna Wright (Howth YC) and Hannah Dadley-Young (Ballyholme YC) are now racing 4.7s along with Daniel Palmer (Ballyholme YC), who's moved in from the Topper class, along with Mauro G Regueral Noguerol (RCYC).

Four-course areas will operate in Cork Habour Aghada, Curlane Bank, Cuskinny and Roches Point with an 11-race schedule for the ILCA 6/Laser class.

Racing begins on Thursday, October 28th, and as well as deciding national honours, the event serves as the second part of a qualifications system to determine Ireland's representative at the Youth World Sailing Championships in Oman this December.

Published in Youth Sailing

Youth World ILCA 6/Laser Radial Champion Eve McMahon from Howth Yacht Club is a clear favourite for success at this Thursday's youth sailing championships hosted by Royal Cork Yacht Club and sponsored by Investwise.

Former Irish youth champion McMahon, who earned more international stripes this month with a senior world championship race win in Bulgaria, is embarked on a campaign to represent Ireland at Paris 2024, so there's no doubt the U18 sailor will be putting her impressive boat speed on show in Cork Harbour

This month, laser sailors have been training on the Royal Cork race track with Tokyo trialist Aisling Keller as a coach in advance of the championships.

Tralee Bay's Ellie CunnaneTralee Bay's Ellie Cunnane (right) Photo: Bob Bateman

The closest guide to form is the 2021 Laser National Championships held in Royal Cork back in August. At that event – in which McMahon did not compete – Tralee Bay's Ellie Cunnane was third overall and top Girl in the 46-boat national championship fleet.

Cunnane will be racing on Cork waters again next week, but there will be no doubting McMahon's speed advantage, especially in breeze. The sixth-year student demonstrated that with a consistent scoreline on Lake Garda in August to take the Girl's worlds crown, as Afloat reported here.

Laser 4.7 sailing in Cork HarbourLaser 4.7 sailing in Cork Harbour

Next week, four-course areas will operate for the youth championships in Cork Habour; Aghada, Curlane Bank, Cuskinny and Roches Point with an 11-race schedule for the ILCA 6/Laser class.

Racing begins on Thursday, October 28th, and as well as deciding national honours, the event serves as the second part of a qualifications system to determine Ireland's representative at the Youth World Sailing Championships in Oman this December.

Published in Youth Sailing

Competitors in today's AIB Autumn Series in the Royal Cork Yacht Club competed over one and a half-mile long windward-leeward courses off Cork Harbour

After six races sailed in the three boat IRC SPIN 0 Division, Conor Phelan's, Ker 37 Jump Juice leads overall but share the same points 7.0 as Annamarie and Denis Murphy's Grand Soliel 40 Nieulargo. 

Conor Phelan's, Ker 37 Jump JuiceConor Phelan's, Ker 37 Jump Juice

In the seven boat IRC SPIN 1 division, Kieran Collins Olson 30 Coracle IV has a one-point margin after six races sailed over the Jones Family J109 Jelly Baby.  Third is the Kinsale sistership Artful Dodjer skippered by Finbarr O'Regan.

Kieran Collins Olson 30 Coracle IV leads the IRC SPIN 1 divisionKieran Collins Olson 30 Coracle IV leads the IRC SPIN 1 division

J109 Close combat - The Jones Family J109 Jelly Baby and Artful Dodjer skippered by Finbarr O'ReganJ109 Close combat - The Jones Family J109 Jelly Baby and Artful Dodjer skippered by Finbarr O'Regan

Dave Lane's J24 YaGottaWanna leads overall on ten points in the nine boat SPIN 2 IRC division from Fiona Young's Albin Express North Star on 13 points. The Tony Donworth Quarter Tonner SuperNova is third on 14 points.

Dave Lane's J24 YaGottaWanna (IRL5098) and Richard Leonard's Bolero BanditDave Lane's J24 YaGottaWanna (IRL5098) and Richard Leonard's Bolero Bandit

Results are here and scroll down for today's photo gallery

Aidan Heffernan's Dufour 36, Indulgence leads IRC White Sails Division Two	Aidan Heffernan's Dufour 36, Indulgence leads IRC White Sails Division One

RCYC Autumn Series Photo Gallery Day 4

Published in Royal Cork YC
Tagged under

Competitors in today's AIB Autumn Series in the Royal Cork Yacht Club enjoyed light northerly breezes and summer-like conditions.

All fleets sailed coastal courses off Cork Harbour under the watchful eye of race officer Ross Deasy. 

Kieran Collins Coracle IV of the host club continues to lead the IRC Spinnaker 1 Division. 

Class 0, 1 and Sports boats headed all the way south to Cork Buoy for their first mark, followed by Harp, Ringabella and beat to finish off White Bay. 

Race officer Ross DeasyRace officer Ross Deasy

The Olson 30 made the most of the light winds to stay ahead of Brian Jones' J/109 Jelly Baby after four races sailed. 

Third in the seven boat fleet overall is Kinsale visitor, Finbarr O'Regan's J109 Artful Dodjer.

Conor Phelan's Ker 37 Jump JuiceConor Phelan's Ker 37 Jump Juice

In a three boat IRC Zero division, the Grand Soleil 40, Nieulargo (Denis and Annamarie Murphy) leads on five points from Conor Phelan's Ker 37 Jump Juice on seven. Eric & Wan Waterman's X37 Saxon Senator is third.

Class 2, 3 and non-spinnaker started their coastal race at Cage and sailed to Harp, Ringabella, No.14 off the refinery, back to Roches Point, and finished at White Bay.

Dave Lane's J/24 YaGottaWannaDave Lane's J/24 YaGottaWanna

There's only a point between the top three in nine boat IRC 2 Spinnaker division. Dave Lane's J/24 YaGottaWanna leads on six points from today's race winner Fiona Young's Albin Express North Star on seven. Tony Donworth's Quarter Tonner SuperNova is third on eight points.

In the dayboat IRC division, the race winning 1720 Heroes & Villans leads from Michael McCann's Etchell Don't Dilly Dally but the pair are drawn on four points each. Third is Billy Campion's 1720 Wight Hare.

Michael McCann's Etchell Don't Dilly DallyMichael McCann's Etchell Don't Dilly Dally

In the biggest division of the league, the White Sails ECHO Division 2, with 12 entries, Conor Hanlon's Sun Odyssey Lapwing leads from John O'Connor's Impala Fast Buck. Third is Mike Rider's Dehler 37 Freya.

The RCYC Autumn League White Sails divisionThe RCYC Autumn League White Sails division

Sailors were met by a live band and food in the club on arrival ashore at Crosshaven.

Racing continues next Sunday with the penultimate races.

Results are here

Day Three AIB Autumn League RCYC Photo Gallery By Bob Bateman

Published in Royal Cork YC
Page 5 of 57

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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