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Cork Harbour Sailing Clubs Join Forces to Develop Cruiser Racing

15th April 2017
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Two Cork Harbour Clubs have combined efforts to promote cruiser racing in the harbour this Summer Two Cork Harbour Clubs have combined efforts to promote cruiser racing in the harbour this Summer Photo: Bob Bateman

Monkstown Bay and Cove Sailing Clubs have agreed a joint cruiser racing programme for this season which will set a new course in Cork harbour sailing, writes Afloat's Tom MacSweeney in the Evening Echo.

The neighbouring clubs have been in discussion for some time with the aim of engaging in joint racing. Like clubs around the country, it has been proving difficult to maintain cruiser racing, so getting together for inter-club racing is a way forward in strengthening interest in the sport.

Monkstown Bay SC cruisers concentrate on white sail racing while Cove has both white sail and spinnaker classes.

Both have agreed a series of inter-club white sail events, when cruisers from both will race together. They will also run their own club sailing programmes, so this could be the ‘best of both worlds’ for the sailors. It is a positive development, one to be welcomed in bringing clubs in Cork Harbour together.

While there may be some adjustments to the schedule as the season progresses, which can invariably happen with the best-laid plans, the agreed approach involves both clubs joining forces on Sunday May 21 and Saturday, May 27, starting together on the Cove SC line. Monkstown will, in the same month run its own weekly Thursday night league. Cove will launch its sailing programme with a formal announcement of the season’s plans on May 5.

On Saturday, June 3, the June Bank Holiday Weekend both clubs will race in Monkstown which will also be the Sea Hennessy Trophy for Monkstown boats, to honour that village’s much-revered sailor, the late Charlie Hennessy. The clubs will gather together again in Cobh on four Fridays in June – 9, 16, 23 and 30. A race to Kinsale, which will also be a ‘feeder’ for the Sovereign’s Cup there, is planned on Saturday, June 17. For boats not racing in the Cup series, this will be an overnight occasion, with a race back to Cork Harbour the following day.

In July Monkstown will hold its ‘At Home Regatta’ on Saturday, July 8, which SCORA, the South Coast Offshore Racing Association, is expected to support and on Saturdays, July 15, 22, 29, Cove will join MBSC in racing at Monkstown. On Sunday, July 23 racing will be in Cove.

August is generally the month when boats head West for holiday cruising, so no joint racing is planned, but they will gather again in September. On Saturday, September 2, the Ballinacurra Race will start from Cove and finish in East Ferry. Saturday, September 9, is the date scheduled for the annual Cobh-to-Blackrock Race and there are joint MBSC and Cove SC events planned on Saturdays September 16, 23 and 30.

Hopefully, this inter-club initiative will boost cruiser racing in Cork Harbour.

Published in Cork Harbour

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It’s one of the largest natural harbours in the world – and those living near Cork Harbour insist that it’s also one of the most interesting.

This was the last port of call for the most famous liner in history, the Titanic, but it has been transformed into a centre for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

The harbour has been a working port and a strategic defensive hub for centuries, and it has been one of Ireland's major employment hubs since the early 1900s. Traditional heavy industries have waned since the late 20th century, with the likes of the closure of Irish Steel in Haulbowline and shipbuilding at Verolme. It still has major and strategic significance in energy generation, shipping and refining.

Giraffe wander along its shores, from which tens of thousands of men and women left Ireland, most of them never to return. The harbour is home to the oldest yacht club in the world, and to the Irish Navy. 

This deep waterway has also become a vital cog in the Irish economy. 

 

‘Afloat.ie's Cork Harbour page’ is not a history page, nor is it a news focus. It’s simply an exploration of this famous waterway, its colour and its characters.

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